Never too Late to Read Classics discussion

Quo Vadis
This topic is about Quo Vadis
70 views
Archive In Translation > 2018 December: Quo Vadis (Polish)

Comments Showing 1-18 of 18 (18 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Res.


message 2: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Res.


message 3: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Anyone reading this book? I have it on my tbr shelf. I feel it is great for the holiday season:-)


message 4: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 8738 comments Mod
I finished this book a couple of days ago and really enjoyed it. I wanted to make sure I had time to read it before Christmas so I started a couple of weeks early. I read it a lot faster than I thought I would because the plot just moved along. It is a worthwhile read.


message 5: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 539 comments Mod
I am reading it. I am enjoying it so far.


message 6: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Good to hear that you both like it.


message 7: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1360 comments I will be reading this but there is only 1 copy at my library and 2 people ahead of me so might be February before I get it. I will post when I have it. :)


message 8: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 8738 comments Mod
I hope you enjoy it, Tracey.


Inese Okonova | 69 comments I read this novel right after the The Teutonic Knights and trilogy With Fire and Sword. I remember all of them vaguely and I know that I enjoyed the trilogy better. But I was in my teens and tried to read everything connected to Eastern European and Baltic history. Romans were not so interesting for me then. So, I do not know... Maybe I should give these great books another chance sometime in future. Anyway I can confirm that Quo Vadis along Sienkiewicz's other works was another brick in my growing interest for history, which has not disappeared since then.


message 10: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 8738 comments Mod
I enjoy reading history and learning about the past too, Inese. For an interesting look at Roman history, I recommend The Twelve Caesars, by Suetonius. Not only is it a fascinating book, with a lot of action, it also is a good background read for Quo Vadis.
For any of our members who are interested in early Christian history, The Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament of the Bible is a good resource.


message 11: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 539 comments Mod
I am enjoying it, but it is a bit preachy and christian apologetic. When you see those christians you ask what transformed these ones in those ones who killed Hipatia. I suppose was power. When they were persecuted they were more pacific, when they were in power they become violent and defensive.

But as a Roman story it is quite interesting. This book was written to be filmed by Cecil B De Mille, I was surprised that he was not who filmed it.


message 12: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rosemarie | 8738 comments Mod
I think that power changes people and organizations as well, Rafael, in both the secular and religious worlds.
Nero is a prime example of the depravity of a Roman emperor-with too much power and a very selfish personality. There were many better emperors, but a few were just as bad.


message 13: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 539 comments Mod
Indeed. And your recommendation of The Twelve Caesars was a good one. People should read it as well. They were quite depraved.


Peter (slawophilist) | 96 comments I read "Quo vadis" a long time ago, when I was still learning Latin at school and shortly after watching the 1951 movie with Peter Ustinov as Nero. My impression then, I remember, was ambiguous. I liked the character of Petronius - still need to read his book The Satyricon - and Marcus' struggle between allegiance to the emperor, his own feeling of duty and justice and his love to Lygia. On the other hand I felt indoctrinated by Sienkiewicz missionary christianity.

At an exhibilition on Nero a couple of years ago in Trier I learnt, however, that Nero's picture had been distorted by the emperors following him, in particular the Flavians, and Suetonius on behalf of them.

Talking about Sienkiewicz, I prefer his short stories and so-called Trilogy consisting of three books presenting Polish history in the 17th century and the fights against the cossacks (Khmelnitsky Uprising), Swedes and Turks. In Poland they are still extremely popular due to movies adaptations.


message 15: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Inese wrote: "I read this novel right after the The Teutonic Knights and trilogy With Fire and Sword. I remember all of them vaguely and I know that I enjoyed the trilogy better. But ..."

Thanks Inese. I’m going to look at these. Seems they are very interesting reads.


message 16: by Claire (new) - added it

Claire  | 241 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I think that power changes people and organizations as well, Rafael, in both the secular and religious worlds.
Nero is a prime example of the depravity of a Roman emperor-with too much power and a..."


Some were a lot worse. There is some doubt as to the figure Nero:-) He might have been a bit less bad than we know.
But I agree that one allways sees that power corrupts. Sadly:-(


message 17: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 539 comments Mod
Peter wrote: "I read "Quo vadis" a long time ago, when I was still learning Latin at school and shortly after watching the 1951 movie with Peter Ustinov as Nero. My impression then, I remember, was ambiguous. I ..."

I agree that this book is too preachy. I like Petronius too. He is very clever, know how to handle Nero very well. I am enjoying the historic bits. I am almost at the middle of third part. I am anxious to see how Sienkiewicz wil describe the christians fighting with the beasts.


message 18: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 539 comments Mod
I finish it. It is a good book that could be less preachy. The most likable character was Petronius. The Arbiter of elegancies could not die in a more elegant way, could he? Calmly, beautifully and peacefully.


back to top