2019 ONTD Reading Challenge discussion

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2018 ♦️ARCHIVES♦️ DECEMBER > DECEMBER - A book that won an award in 2018

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message 1: by Lea (new)

Lea | 226 comments Mod
Any award you want - you can go high-brow with the Nobel Prize for Literature, the Man Booker Prize or the National Book Award, explore what’s best in speculative fiction with the Hugo and Nebula awards, get scared by the Shirley Jackson or Bram Stoker Awards, read women with the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, fall in love with the Romance Writers of America (RITA Awards), etc!

BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION
Awarded to a female author of any nationality for the best original full-length novel written in English, and published in the UK in the preceding year
Home Fire - Kamila Shamsie

GOLDEN MAN BOOKER PRIZE
The best Man Booker winner of the past 50 years
The English Patient - Michael Ondaatje

MAN BOOKER PRIZE
Best original novel, written in the English language and published in the UK
Milkman - Anna Burns

MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE
Given to a book in English translation
Flights - Olga Tokarczuk

PULITZER PRIZE
An award for achievements in literature in the United States
Less - Andrew Sean Greer (Best Fiction)
Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder - Caroline Fraser (Best Biography)
The Gulf: The Making of An American Sea - Jack E. Davis (Best History)
Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America - James Forman Jr (Best General Nonfiction)

PEN/FAULKNER AWARD FOR FICTION
Awarded to the year's best works of fiction by living American citizens
Improvement - Joan Silber

PRIX GONCOURT
France's most prestigious literary prize
Leurs enfants après eux - Nicolas Mathieu

COSTA BOOK AWARDS
Recognises English-language books by writers based in Britain and Ireland
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman (First Novel)
Inside the Wave - Helen Dunmore (Poetry + Book of the Year)
Reservoir 13 - Jon McGregor (Novel)
In the Days of Rain: A Daughter, a Father, a Cult - Rebecca Stott (Biography)

BRITISH BOOK AWARDS
Honours the commercial successes of publishers, authors and bookshops
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman (Début Book of the Year and Overall Winner)
Reservoir 13 - Jon McGregor (Fiction)
The Dry - Jane Harper (Crime & Thriller)
Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race - Reni Eddo Lodge (Nonfiction Narrative)
The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas & The Lost Words (Robert Macfarlane) (joint winners Children's Book)

WELLCOME BOOK PRIZE
Celebrates exceptional books that engage with the topics of health and medicine
To Be a Machine : Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death - Mark O'Connell

CARNEGIE MEDAL
A British award that recognises one outstanding book for children or young adults
Where the World Ends - Geraldine McCaughrean

YA BOOK PRIZE
Champions Young Adult books written by authors living in the UK or Ireland
After the Fire - Will Hill

WATERSTONE'S CHILDREN'S BOOK PRIZE
An award given to a work of children's literature published during the previous year, open only to authors who have published no more than three books
The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas (Overall Winner and Older Fiction)


message 2: by Lea (new)

Lea | 226 comments Mod
HUGO AWARDS
Awards the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year
The Stone Sky - NK Jemisin (Novel)
All Systems Red - Martha Wells (Novella)
No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters - Ursula K LeGuin (Related Work)

NEBULA AWARDS
Recognizes the best works of science fiction or fantasy published in the United States. Awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America
The Stone Sky - NK Jemisin (Novel)
All Systems Red - Martha Wells (Novella)

ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD
A UK prize for science fiction literature
Dreams Before the Start of Time - Anne Charnock

CRIME WRITING ASSOCIATION DAGGERS
The Liar - Steve Cavanagh (Gold Dagger: Crime Novel)
Bluebird, Bluebird - Attica Locke (Ian Fleming Steel Dagger: Best Thriller)
Lola - Melissa Scrivner Love (New Blood Dagger: Crime Novel, 1st Time Author)
After the Fire - Henning Mankell (International)
Blood on the Page - Thomas Harding (Non Fiction)
Nucleus - Rory Clements (Historical)

EDGAR AWARDS
Awarded by Mystery Writers of America
Bluebird, Bluebird - Attica Locke (Novel)
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI - David Grann (Fact Crime)

BRAM STOKER AWARDS
Awarded by the Horror Writers Association
Winners here: http://www.sfadb.com/Bram_Stoker_Awar...

SHIRLEY JACKSON AWARDS
Celebrates outstanding achievement in horror, psychological suspense, and dark fantasy fiction
The Hole - Hye-Young Pyun
Fever Dream - Samantha Schweblin & The Lost Daughter Collective - Lindsay Drager (joint winners, Novella)

RITA AWARDS
Romance Writers of America
Winners here: https://www.rwa.org/page/2018-winners

BRITISH FANTASY AWARDS
Awarded by the British Fantasy Society
The Ninth Rain - Jen Williams (Fantasy)
Strange Weather - Joe Hill (Collection)
The Changeling - Victor Lavalle (Horror)


message 3: by Cathryn (new)

Cathryn (commonlogic) | 17 comments Thank you so much for posting all this! I've been stressed about this category for a few months now trying to figure out what I'd choose since I'd already read the book I was most interested in earlier in the year (The Stone Sky).

Will definitely be reading All Systems Red and maybe Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine since I own both!


message 4: by Sophie (new)

Sophie | 24 comments I think I will be reading All Systems Red but we'll see!


message 5: by Lea (last edited Nov 11, 2018 08:29AM) (new)

Lea | 226 comments Mod
No problem guys. And just a reminder that you don't have to pick any of the awards listed, there are many, many more out there (just make sure it is a legit award).

I found this website which talks a bit about some of the winners listed here: https://www.bookbub.com/blog/2018/06/...

Also: I've read Eleanor Oliphant last year and it is GREAT. Highly recommend it. I think I'll be going for All Systems Red this month.


message 6: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Z. | 62 comments I will be reading Ararat, which won the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Novel.


message 7: by Ran (last edited Nov 13, 2018 08:46PM) (new)

Ran (ranc) | 6 comments I absolutely loved All Systems Red (the whole series is great). I'm going to tackle either The Changeling or Milkman.


message 8: by Tejal (new)

Tejal (ohsodebonair) | 30 comments I'll be reading Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine as I already own it and I have sort of been saving it up for this month. But I might have a look at some of the other award winners too like Home Fire.


message 9: by Anthony (new)

Anthony (Anthh) | 11 comments My copy of Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder is In Transit to the library so that's going to be my pick. Other books had like 300+ waitlists but I actually fondly remember reading her books in elementary so I'm excited to start.


message 10: by Cara (new)

Cara (hidingmyheart) | 35 comments Probably going to read The Hate U Give, finally.


message 11: by Undine (new)

Undine | 58 comments I'm gonna read All Systems Red because I already have it!


message 12: by Lea (new)


message 13: by Ran (new)

Ran (ranc) | 6 comments I finished both The Changeling and Milkman. I didn't find LaValle's novel quite as captivating as I did his novella, The Ballad of Black Tom. However, I would highly recommend the Man Booker Award winner this year, Milkman because the narrative style is so interesting. If the long blocky paragraphs throw you off it, try the audio. The audiobook narrator, Bríd Brennan, is fantastic.


message 14: by EJ (new)

EJ (skrlos) | 12 comments I just finished She Rides Shotgun in about four days so safe to say I thought it was great. The writing style really kept my attention and I thought it was a unique premise.


message 15: by Sasha (new)

Sasha | 66 comments Finished Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine. Think it hit too close to home in regards to it's references to depression for me to have a not uncomfortable time reading the book. Still, I'll be lingering over it in my thoughts for the next week or so.


message 16: by Cathryn (new)

Cathryn (commonlogic) | 17 comments I finished All Systems Red and I enjoyed it well enough. Love the idea of the murderbot's journey of self-exploration and it's quite amusing, but I found the actual story itself to be a little boring. Not sure whether I'll read the rest of the series or not.

I've decided to read Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine a little later. I have books on my Currently Reading list that I want to finish up before the end of the year -- I'll be so satisfied if I can get a few more books off of there.


message 17: by Sophie (new)

Sophie | 24 comments I finished All Systems Red and didn't end up liking it much. It was so short but I swear I've been reading it forever, I'd put it down and do something else and feel no inclination to pick it up again.


message 18: by Tejal (new)

Tejal (ohsodebonair) | 30 comments I finished Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine this morning. It was jarring at first because it wasn't what I initially expected, but by the halfway point, I'd really warmed up to her and I was disappointed when it ended. It left me with a very hopeful feeling so I really quite liked it. I didn't realise how quickly I had gotten through it until there was only 30 pages or so left.


message 19: by Juliana (new)

Juliana (Julzreads) | 70 comments I read Take the Lead because it won the RITA award this year. It was cute and I got through it in a timely manner. I've read better romance books but I can see how it won. At least I completed the challenge this year! I definitely did better last year in terms of all the challenges.


message 20: by Undine (new)

Undine | 58 comments All Systems Red is my favorite book I've read this year and I love Murderbot and am looking forward to reading the sequels. I love that we all had very different opinions on it.


message 21: by Lea (new)

Lea | 226 comments Mod
Yeah, I wasn't crazy about All Systems Red, it reminded me of The Martian - another book I thought was just alright. Maybe I just don't like this kind of science fiction very much.


message 22: by Eve (new)

Eve (eveofrevolution) | 102 comments The mixed reviews of All Systems Red is kind of making me curious! Maybe I’ll pick it up and see what I think, especially since it’s so short.


message 23: by Dainey (new)

Dainey | 23 comments I loved All Systems Red! It wasn't super heavy on the science fiction side, and for me the appeal was definitely Murderbot itself. It's definitely easy reading and worth checking out if you're curious.

I'd love to know how many of us on #TeamMurderbot are retail drones, because I can see that being a huge reason why I related to the character so much. Unfortunately I can't secretly watch daytime soaps while only pretending to pay attention.


message 24: by Undine (last edited Dec 18, 2018 06:08PM) (new)

Undine | 58 comments Dainey wrote: "'d love to know how many of us on #TeamMurderbot are retail drones, because I can see that being a huge reason why I related to the character so much. Unfortunately I can't secretly watch daytime soaps while only pretending to pay attention."

Not retail, but definitely related to not wanting to deal with customers, and listening to audiobooks while doing a job I don't care about!

Lea wrote: "Yeah, I wasn't crazy about All Systems Red, it reminded me of The Martian - another book I thought was just alright. Maybe I just don't like this kind of science fiction very much."

That's funny because I REALLY did not like The Martian! It's right up there with The Da Vinci Code in terms of "what the fuck book did everyone else read?!?" (uh, turns out I had strong feelings about this) (view spoiler) At least the movie has a disco soundtrack...Anyway, I like that Murderbot isn't just pandering to bros, and I was kinda worried it would be because it was also widely talked about!


message 25: by Lea (new)

Lea | 226 comments Mod
Undine wrote: "Dainey wrote: "That's funny because I REALLY did not like The Martian! It's right up there with The Da Vinci Code in terms of "what the fuck book did everyone else read?!?" (uh, turns out I had strong feelings about this) (view spoiler) At least the movie has a disco soundtrack...Anyway, I like that Murderbot isn't just pandering to bros, and I was kinda worried it would be because it was also widely talked about!"

Well, what I didn't like about the Martian wasn't the science stuff (I frankly would not know if anything was accurate or not), it was the grating "how do you do fellow kids" style, the nerdy Internet slang overuse. This bothered me about the Martian (and I think it's very much part of what made it so bro-y) and All Systems Red (it got less bad as the story went on though) and, now that I think about it, The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet (that one I literally couldn't finish).

So it's something I've been noticing in contemporary sci-fi and that I just find really annoying. Clearly many sci-fi readers appreciate it though, judging by the popularity of these books.


message 26: by Undine (new)

Undine | 58 comments Lea wrote: "Undine wrote: "Dainey wrote: "That's funny because I REALLY did not like The Martian! It's right up there with The Da Vinci Code in terms of "what the fuck book did everyone else read?!?" (uh, turn..."

I think All Systems Red having a female author made all the difference for me, but I can see why it wouldn't matter if the colloquial internet tone in general bugs you. I think you're onto something about how circle jerky nerd culture is influencing the tone of sci-fi.


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