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Helping You To Know The News > Outspoken Elderly Adults Have Uninhibited Brains

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message 1: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments http://www.medpagetoday.com/Psychiatr...

Heh. And what's your excuse?




message 2: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments occasionally older people seem to feel some kind of entitlement to be rude based on just age. i think some of them grow out of any tact they ever had

i personally can't wait til i get a free pass to tell someone they are a dumb ass or that i hate their hair


message 3: by Matt (new)

Matt | 819 comments Two things I can't wait to say when i'm old:
1. "GET OFF MY LAWN!!!"
2. "And I would have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for you meddling kids!!!"


message 4: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments 3. "Just sit on the davenport until your mom gets back!"


message 5: by Félix (last edited Aug 19, 2009 12:05PM) (new)

Félix (habitseven) Davenport. Wow, I haven't heard that in a long time.


message 6: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments You know how every now and then on a tv show or movie they have an old person who talks about sex and it's really creepy?

I don't want to be that person.


message 7: by Sally, la reina (new)

Sally (mrsnolte) | 17320 comments Mod
My grandpa used to be a beacon of truth regarding my appearance.

"Sally, you're looking fat."

"Hey, Sally! Slimming down!"

"You looked better a few months ago."

And the like. It was always horrific to hear that I'd recently slimmed down from what he perceived as his obese granddaughter. Yes, my grandpa was sexist, weightist, and biased. He was a man of the fifties, what with his bourbon and easy chair and doting wife and all.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

My grandma points at black people. Its terrifying.


message 9: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I hear you, Stefano. My grandmother once saw a dance show on tv and said "look at all the jigs dancing!" She didn't mean it as an insult, but still...


message 10: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments yup. different era when politically correctness was not a factor



message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Not too long ago some people in my family were having an I Hate Obama discussion and my grandma chimed in and said, "but he's the president and I want to like him." Isn't that amazing? I thought that was just as candid as any racist remark.


message 12: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Maybe it's just me -- but I tend to think of "political correctness" as a pejorative term for not being bigoted.

Yeah ... used to be bigotry was more commonly accepted as the way it was. I know some people look back at that era longingly.

I'm not talking about you, Kevin. What you said just sparked the thoughts.

I remember being around relatives when I was growing up who would make jokes about how they had to change the name of chiggers to chegros. Of course, these were people who never knew anyone outside of their own race, and who would call any Asian a "Chinaman."


message 13: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments i that era they still had the stereotypes on TV which reinforced them. Hop-Sing on Gunsmoke, Pancho on The Cisco Kid and shuck-n-jive servants on other shows made it mainstream to be like that. in those days different ethnic groups and cultures lived segregated in "little china" or across the tracks. they were not our neighbors and co-workers. we had to birth a new generation who went to school and played together


message 14: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Yep.


message 15: by RandomAnthony (last edited Aug 24, 2009 09:00AM) (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I put a great deal of stock in intent...e.g...if an older person used a negative term in a meanspirited way it's a lot different than using an offensive term unintentionally.

Oh, this reminds me of a teaching story. I was teaching in an elementary school about ten, twelve years ago when a staff member got on the public address system to talk about a nut sale the school was holding as a fundraiser. While outlining the kind of nuts for sale, she said something like "cashews, peanuts, ni--er toes..." Apparently that last term is a, uh, descriptive terms for types of nuts. She felt HORRIBLE about saying that on the public address system...that's just what she grew up calling the nuts.


message 16: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Ouch.


message 17: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments RandomAnthony wrote: "While outlining the kind of nuts for sale, she said something like "cashews, peanuts, ni--er toes...""




Brazil Nuts. My great-grandfather called them that also - I was 5 years old when I heard it for the first time, and I told him I didn't like that word and he needs to call them by their real name. They're Brazil Nuts. My grandmother fussed at me for being disrespectful to my elder, but he always called 'em Brazil Nuts after that.



message 18: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments my grandmother called them that too


message 19: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) I never heard that one.


message 20: by Donitello (new)

Donitello | 148 comments Larry wrote: "Maybe it's just me -- but I tend to think of "political correctness" as a pejorative term for not being bigoted."

In California, calling someone "politically correct" means they're mouthing liberal platitudes. I think this is due to the fact that it's uncool to be "conservative" (read: possessing 50s sensibilities). You'll hear the most twisted sentiments, like, "It's hard to be a Liberal when you live in this (affordable but multicultural) neighborhood."

This is especially true in San Francisco and LA -- the rest of the state is unapologetically conservative, although even they use knee-jerk liberal phraseology, just to cover the ol' butt.




message 21: by Kevin (new)

Kevin  (ksprink) | 11469 comments i prefer, and try, to be correctly correct. to me that would be stating the facts while still taking in consideration peoples feelings and being sensitive to how or what i say might affect people around me. if i am misunderstood or appear soft BUT have spared someone hurt or pain i am more than ok with that. i don't really need to be heard or even understood. i need to be kind and caring. lets be honest, we don't need to give descriptors to people most of the time anyway.


message 22: by Stephen (new)

Stephen (stephenT) RandomAnthony wrote: "http://www.medpagetoday.com/Psychiatr...

Heh. And what's your excuse?

"
I feel so betrayed. I was going to post this story. Is this the place to post all the great articles I find?




message 23: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24076 comments Mod
That is horrible about Brazil nuts. I've never heard that one before, thank goodness. I had an old uncle who called African Americans "colored people" but fortunately I never heard anything worse than that. And colored people used to be the official term (NAACP).

I wish we could just stop using "politically correct." To me it's outlived its usefulness.


message 24: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments RandomAnthony wrote: "You know how every now and then on a tv show or movie they have an old person who talks about sex and it's really creepy?

I don't want to be that person."


That was the entire premise of "Golden Girls."

I hated that show.


message 25: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "That is horrible about Brazil nuts. I've never heard that one before, thank goodness. I had an old uncle who called African Americans "colored people" but fortunately I never heard anything worse..."

My FIL said his opponent in Fantasy Baseball was in the lead for a while because of "all his wetback pitchers." He also occasionally mentions that not many spearchuckers live in southern Utah.

I don't call him on it every time. Probably should? But I DEFINITELY inform my son that those terms are NOT acceptable, and that grandpa grew up in different times.


message 26: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments Old people have these ingrained attitudes and beliefs that I don't challenge. What's the point? But I think they notice the dead silence after they make a bigoted comment.


message 27: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) Scout wrote: "Old people have these ingrained attitudes and beliefs that I don't challenge. What's the point? But I think they notice the dead silence after they make a bigoted comment."

Or ... not.


message 28: by Stacia (the 2010 club) (last edited Apr 19, 2011 10:29PM) (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (stacia_r) Kevin "El Liso Grande" wrote: "i prefer, and try, to be correctly correct. i need to be kind and caring..."

This. However, I don't like having to walk on eggshells about every single thing I say for fear that it might offend someone, somewhere. It can get frustrating. But I do always at least try my hardest to be nice to people and if I know something will bother another person, I choose not to say/do it (unless it's family and that's another story).

There's nothing wrong with good old fashioned politeness and respect. The world could use more of it. On the flip side though, I do think people go overboard trying to make everything a potential offense.

On another note, it is true about old people being set in their ways. I guess you almost have to just chalk it up to them coming from another time and realize that no matter how much it would be nice to change their minds and prejudices that it probably won't happen, and by this point in their life it's probably not worth wasting the time on.


message 29: by Helena (new)

Helena | 1058 comments Not that I am elderly, by any stretch of the imagination... but watching my parents- in particular my father- he seems to have less patience now. He’s always been straightforward, as have I- but it seems the older we get, the less patience we have for ‘pussyfooting’ around an issue.


message 30: by Dr. Detroit (new)

Dr. Detroit | 6017 comments Is 53 considered elderly?


message 31: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments Not if you are 52.


message 32: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments I am now 63, I know I have a lot less patience now than I did when I was 33 because I know I have less time ahead of me than I have in back of me. Please remember the very old (80 and above went through a few wars,started the civil rights movement and a whole lot more. we are living history. so, for all of us over 60: write your memories down and pass them along. give them to your local historical association or library or favorite child/grandchild. don't let them die with you.


message 33: by Maxine (new)

Maxine | 47 comments I am 60 and I'm not sure if I am ruder than i used to be but I do feel that I have earned the right to my opinions. I have marched in civil right demonstrations, protested several wars and nuclear proliferation, raised a pretty decent human being, and worked on behalf of my union until I retired. I understand that others don't share my views and that's okay but it drives me to distraction when I am told by young whippersnappers that I need to be more 'openminded' when i disagree with them. Give me a rational and well-thought-out argument and I may change my mind but arguments based on apochrypa and faith just don't cut it with me any more so I guess, when I give these people the finger (verbal or otherwise), it might seem a little rude.


message 34: by Jammies (new)

Jammies BunWat wrote: "Maxine wrote: "Give me a rational and well-thought-out argument and I may change my mind but arguments based on apochrypa and faith just don't cut it with me any more so I guess, when I give these people the finger (verbal or otherwise), it might seem a little rude. ..."

Hear hear!!
::Stands on chair and raises a glass to Maxine::

(psssst, maxine, apochrypha)"


*also raises glass in agreement*

(psssst, Bun, apocrypha)


message 35: by Jammies (new)

Jammies Pssstapocalyptic! :D Thank you for the laugh and for your good grace!


message 36: by Maxine (new)

Maxine | 47 comments Jammies wrote: "BunWat wrote: "Maxine wrote: "Give me a rational and well-thought-out argument and I may change my mind but arguments based on apochrypa and faith just don't cut it with me any more so I guess, whe..."

Crap, could I pass it off as a freudian slip?


message 37: by Jammies (new)

Jammies BunWat wrote: "Just FEI (For Everybody's Information) I really don't mind having my typos pointed out to me. People make mistakes. If everybody is too polite to tell me I'm walking around with my skirt tucked in..."

Also FEI, I do not make a habit of pointing out typos, but since Bun and I have discussed the typographical karma of making mistakes in a post when you're telling someone else about her mistake, I knew she would be as amused as I am when it happens to me.


message 38: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments It seems almost inevitable.


message 39: by Maxine (new)

Maxine | 47 comments My only excuse is that my spelling is so often corrected by my American spellcheck that I have a tendency to ignore it. Anyway apocrhyphal, apocrypha (or, as I like to say, apocrypa), potatoe, potato, spurious, Christian, it's all Greek to me.


message 40: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments BunWat wrote: "Its some variant of Murphy's Law, I'm sure."

Hehehe. Its what?


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