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RMFAO 2018 Genre Challenges > October'18: Horror

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message 1: by Heena (last edited Nov 01, 2018 10:15PM) (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
Hello everyone,

October is here and so is one of the most awaited genre months of Genre Challenge - Horror. Keeping in step with the month of Halloween, we dedicate this month to horror reads that are creepy, scary and utterly disturbing. Supernatural and paranormal becomes a substantial presence in every reader's days and nights throughout this month and so clearly, this month is not for the faint-hearted! Though, if you're new to the genre or just a casual reader, then do join us on this amazing month-long reading spree because it is wise to read these dark and scary reads in numbers. As usual, you can join anytime during the entire month and read as many books as you can manage, no restrictions whatsoever!

Here is the DEFINITION for this month's genre:

Horror: Horror fiction is fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle, or horrify the audience. Historically, the cause of the "horror" experience has often been the intrusion of a supernatural element into the everyday human experience. Since the 1960s, any work of fiction with a morbid, gruesome, surreal, or exceptionally suspenseful or frightening theme has come to be called "horror". Horror fiction often overlaps science fiction or fantasy, all three of which categories are sometimes placed under the umbrella classification speculative fiction.

-->>Please Note: There are absolutely no limits so you can interpret this genre in its broader sense and include other similar genres and/or subgenres that you feel might have a wee bit of similarity with the main genre. You can also include books that are not particularly centred around the main genre but has its components or elements somewhere in the story.

Here's a quick summary of the levels:

Level 1: Casual Reader: 1 book (easy)
Level 2: Frequent Reader: 2 books (moderate)
Level 3: Bookworm: 3 books (mildly strenuous)
Level 4: Bibliophile: 4 books (strenuous)
Level 5: Bookiopath: 5 books or more (challenging)

Please mention what type of books you'd be reading:

PB: Paperbacks
HB: Hardback
EB: E-Books
AB: Audio Books

Please feel free to announce your to-read books along with the level you are targeting for below.

PLEASE READ (for new members):
1. You can read any number of books for the respective genre each month in one particular month.
2. Take your time and go through your entire TBR-list before deciding the books to read.
3. You can join the challenge at any stage (in any month.)
4. You can drop out of the challenge any time you like.
5. You can select different levels every month.
6. Use this discussion board to share your reads with other members of the group.
7. Please be active and don't hesitate to ask questions or recommend books.

Note: The main intent of this challenge is to incorporate different kinds of books and genres in our normal reading routine to make the experience more fun and entertaining. Please do not lose yourself in the technicalities as we all know how literary genres can be confusing.

If you have any doubts or questions, then post them below and we'll be happy to answer/discuss them.
Happy reading!


message 2: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
Finally, we are here. Humour month was one hell of a long slog and I'm so happy that it is over (and that we're never having a Humour only month ever again!)
I'm planning to read a couple of classics this month by SK and one book by Dean Koontz that I had previously tried to read and ended up DNF'ing because it was too creepy. So, my list of books for this month is:
1. Strange Weather
2. Bag of Bones
3. The Shining
4. 77 Shadow Street
5. The Mask Shop of Doctor Blaack
6. Home to Roost
7. One Night's Stay by C.B. Collins


message 3: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments I've had Lincoln in the Bardo in my sights for a while and might go for this in October. It's on some lists as horror, creepy, or paranormal. I think it certainly might qualify as speculative fiction. I'm looking forward to it. I'll see what else I might add in--maybe a classic horror novel. I've almost finished my goal of 40 mysteries in my mystery group, and 60 books overall for the year, but now I'm hoping to finish 75 books overall for the year.


message 4: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Donna wrote: " I've almost finished my goal of 40 mysteries in my mystery group, and 60 books overall for the year, but now I'm hoping to finish 75 books overall for the year. "

Good luck, Donna. Sounds like you're doing pretty well.


message 5: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
I also have Strange Weather - as soon as it comes in for me, may not be until mid-month, but hopefully not later.

Just pillaged my shelf of old paperbacks and found three - hopefully I'll get to one of them:
I Am Frankenstein by C. Dean Anderson
The Priestess by Frank Lauria
The Frankenstein Papers by Fred Saberhagen

Earlier this year I jotted down this audio book, free from LibriVox:
The Joss: a Reversion by Richard Marsh

I also made a note of this eBook by the author of The 39 Steps and other Richard Hannay novels. From the description though, it sounds like it might be only for fans of Buchan or all things Scottish.
"In the novel Witch Wood (1927) John Buchan depicts with tremendous force a survival of the evil Sabbat in a lonely district of Scotland. The description of the black forest with the evil stone, and of the terrible cosmic adumbrations when the horror is finally extirpated, will repay one for wading through the very gradual action and plethora of Scottish dialect."


message 6: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments If I have time, I should try to fit in some H.P. Lovecraft--my son would be thrilled! One of his favorites, and one of yours too, Dagny, if I remember correctly.


message 7: by Dagny (last edited Sep 26, 2018 12:07PM) (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "If I have time, I should try to fit in some H.P. Lovecraft--my son would be thrilled! One of his favorites, and one of yours too, Dagny, if I remember correctly."

Yes, you are right, Donna, he's a favorite of mine. Your son may have already discovered this site, but if not, here's a great site which includes most of his work (and more):
http://www.hplovecraft.com/


message 8: by Donna (last edited Sep 26, 2018 06:04PM) (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Thanks, I'll have to see if he's aware of it. He and his friends are into board games, and they love playing Call of Cthulthu and Arkham Horror--he has a whole wall of board games! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arkham_...


message 9: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "Thanks, I'll have to see if he's aware of it. He and his friends are into board games, and they love playing Call of Cthulthu and Arkham Horror--he has a whole wall of board games! https://en.wikip..."

I used to have one of those games, only got to play a few times - no one to play with, sob, lol.


message 10: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
I have a few horror books on hold at my library, so I should get them within a week or 2. I won't name anything yet, in case I don't like those books after I get them. I find that I have better luck with books the less planning I put into it. (Sometimes the anticipation of reading a certain book gives me too high of an expectation, which is too hard for the book to live up to and leaves me disappointed.)


message 11: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I have a few horror books on hold at my library, so I should get them within a week or 2. I won't name anything yet, in case I don't like those books after I get them. I find that I have better luc..."

I can relate to this, Cheryl. Same's been happening with me since the last couple of weeks. That's the reason I'm trying not to get too excited about Strange Weather too. I hope it doesn't turn out like Sleeping Beauties.


message 12: by Kathy (new)

Kathy  | 32 comments Donna wrote: "Thanks, I'll have to see if he's aware of it. He and his friends are into board games, and they love playing Call of Cthulthu and Arkham Horror--he has a whole wall of board games! https://en.wikip..."

Donna, I love those games! Even us oldies but goodies enjoy them. I have been playing them since the 1990s.


message 13: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Heena wrote: " I can relate to this, Cheryl. Same's been happening with me since the last couple of weeks. That's the reason I'm trying not to get too excited about Strange Weather too. I hope it doesn't turn out like Sleeping Beauties."

I've already read Strange Weather. I will say that it's not all horror, but all of the novellas are scary in their own way. They are horror, thriller, science fiction/fantasy, and dystopian. It's a quick read, too.


message 14: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 60 comments Kathy wrote: "Donna wrote: "Thanks, I'll have to see if he's aware of it. He and his friends are into board games, and they love playing Call of Cthulthu and Arkham Horror--he has a whole wall of board games! ht..."

I'm another board gamer and am the GM for our Call of Cthulhu group. It's a great hobby.


message 15: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 60 comments Also, I've also given up trying to figure out what I am going to read in advance. I just go where the books take me!


message 16: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Adelaide wrote: "Kathy wrote: "Donna wrote: "Thanks, I'll have to see if he's aware of it. He and his friends are into board games, and they love playing Call of Cthulthu and Arkham Horror--he has a whole wall of b..."

Kathy and Adelaide, that's great to hear that you are board game enthusiasts, and that you play Call of Cthulthu, Adelaide. My son will enjoy hearing about that! I'm looking forward to reading some Lovecraft in October.


message 17: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
I just downloaded The Door of the Unreal by Gerald Biss from Librivox. I was looking there for some horror audios and the description caught my eye:
An early werewolf novel, praised by H.P Lovecraft. The only weird fiction from an author of mainly crime fiction. Two strange disappearances occur on a road in Sussex. The second involved a member of the aristocracy and a famous actress, so a large, but fruitless investigation is held by Scotland Yard. An American, visiting an old friend, who is of the local gentry, suspects something horrible and begins to investigate to verify his fears.. - Summary by Alan Winterrowd
It's free at https://librivox.org/the-door-of-the-...
I plan to look at LibriVox for a couple of others when I get time in case this one doesn't turn out well for me.


message 18: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
The Joss: a Reversion by Richard Marsh 8:59 supernatural classic, audio
Mary Blyth, a sales clerk who is robbed, nearly murdered and then fired from her job, thinks her luck has changed when she inherits an old house from a distant relation, Benjamin Batters. This house holds dark secrets. Murderous thugs, a mysterious threat from the Far East let her know this is not the case. The Joss, a Reversion is from Richard Marsh, author of "The Beetle". - Summary by Alan Winterrowd
https://librivox.org/the-joss-a-rever...

There are several more by Marsh at LibriVox. I read The Beetle a while back and it was a very entertaining read - a "sensation" horror story which was published the same year as Dracula and was even more popular at the time.


message 19: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
Thanks for the interesting recommendations, Dagny. Please share more if you come across some more such titles.


message 20: by Cheryl (last edited Sep 30, 2018 11:46AM) (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Heena wrote: "Thanks for the interesting recommendations, Dagny. Please share more if you come across some more such titles."

Those who like Lovecraft might also want to try stories by M. R. James. Project Gutenberg has 3 of his ghost story collections. You might want to start with this one:
Ghost Stories of an Antiquary
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/8486


message 21: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Cheryl wrote: "Heena wrote: "Thanks for the interesting recommendations, Dagny. Please share more if you come across some more such titles."

Those who like Lovecraft might also want to try stories by M. R. James..."


So many good suggestions--this will be a fun month!


message 22: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Those who like Lovecraft might also want to try stories by M. R. James..."

Good idea about M. R. James, Cheryl. I'm not a great fan of short stories in general, but he really wrote some goodies!


message 23: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "Heena wrote: "Thanks for the interesting recommendations, Dagny. Please share more if you come across some more such titles."
Those who like Lovecraft might also want to try stories by M. R. James..."


Thanks for the reccs., Cheryl. I'll definitely check them out.


message 24: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Well, I read about 75 pages of Lincoln in the Bardo and decided not to finish. It was seriously weird in an intellectual way, and after 75 pages, I realized I just wasn't enjoying it very much. I was disappointed because so many people had given it five stars, but I noticed there were also many people who didn't finish it! Just not my taste, I guess.


message 25: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "Well, I read about 75 pages of Lincoln in the Bardo and decided not to finish."

Donna,

Bravo! No one should have to finish a book they do not like. I have felt bad in the past for not liking some 5 star books on Goodreads, but not anymore. Everyone has different tastes, and you are entitled to your opinion. Maybe you'll even taken a look at it again in the future? Sometimes I'm just not in the mood for certain books.


message 26: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Cheryl wrote: "Donna wrote: "Well, I read about 75 pages of Lincoln in the Bardo and decided not to finish."

Donna,

Bravo! No one should have to finish a book they do not like. I have felt bad i..."


I'm 66, and I figure I'm getting too old to read books I don't like, haha. There are too many good books out there waiting to be read!


message 27: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "Well, I read about 75 pages of Lincoln in the Bardo and decided not to finish. "

I seem to recall giving up on that one too. And I had such high hopes for it.


message 28: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 60 comments 1) Ring by Koji Suzuki. 4 stars. Pretty enjoyable. It's been awhile since I watched Ringu, so I am not sure how the book and movie compare. I'll probably watch it during my month long horror movie fest. (I watch at least 31 horror movies during October. BEST MONTH OF THE YEAR.)


message 29: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Adelaide wrote: " I'll probably watch it during my month long horror movie fest. (I watch at least 31 horror movies during October. BEST MONTH OF THE YEAR.) "

You are a real horror fan! My brother has probably seen every horror movie ever made, from old black and white ones through the new releleases. October is his favorite month, too.


message 30: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
1.) The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan
2 and a half stars. Ok, but nothing special.


message 31: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
Gave up on one I mentioned earlier: The Door of the Unreal by Gerald Biss - I was having a hard time understanding the reader, so just passed on it.

Did finish my first: The Joss: a Reversion by Richard Marsh
It was fun. Scary in parts and (unintentionally) funny in parts, at least to me. Sort of a horror, sensation, romantic hybrid.


message 32: by Donna (last edited Oct 07, 2018 07:38PM) (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments 1. I read a Kindle download of Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by M.R. James, and enjoyed it. It's been so long since I've read horror or ghost stories of any kind--it was fun! I gave it 4/5.


message 33: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Donna wrote: "1. I read a Kindle download of Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by M.R. James, and enjoyed it. It's been so long since I've read horror or ghost stories of any kind--it was fun! I gave ..."

I'm so glad you liked it, Donna. M. R. James is one of my all-time favorite authors.


message 34: by Cheryl (last edited Oct 08, 2018 03:46PM) (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
2.) The Dark Horse Book of Monsters (The Dark Horse Book of..., #4) by Scott Allie The Dark Horse Book of Monsters
2 and a half stars. A graphic novel collection of short stories about monsters. It could've been alot better. The last story was pretty well-done, both visually and plot-wise. I'll have to check out that author's Beasts of Burden series.


message 35: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments Cheryl wrote: "Donna wrote: "1. I read a Kindle download of Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by M.R. James, and enjoyed it. It's been so long since I've read horror or ghost stories of any kind--it wa..."

I'll have to look for more--this is a new author to me!


message 36: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
3.) Black Spirits and White: A Book of Ghost Stories by Ralph Adams Cram
4 stars. Very good collection of ghost stories from 1895. Those who like M. R. James might also like this one. My review can be found here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 37: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
4.) American Vampire, Vol. 1
Graphic novel. 2 and a half stars. Too much about vampire politics (two rival vampire groups.)


message 38: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
1. Souls of the Dark Sea - 3/5
It was a good read, dark (as promised), well-written, good storyline and didn't feel like it was a part of a series (as the blog tour promised) but I think I would have appreciated the characters in this book more had I read the previous book.


message 39: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 60 comments 2) Crooked by Austin Grossman. 3 out 5 stars. Turns out Richard Nixon was fighting eldritch forces. I would have enjoyed this more had I not recently learned that he probably beat Pat up. (She features heavily in the book.)


message 41: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
5.) Nightflyers by George R. R. Martin

2 and a half stars. A mix of horror and science fiction, set aboard a starship. The writing could've been better. This was actually written in 1980, but reissued in illustated book form in anticipation of the SyFy Channel series adapted from this story. (The series premiers December 2, 2018.)


message 42: by Kathy (last edited Nov 03, 2018 04:32PM) (new)

Kathy  | 32 comments 1. The Trench by Steve Alten. Rated 3.25 stars. Horror in the ocean. Think prehistoric shark.
2. Kill Creek by Scott Thomas. 3.5 stars.
3. Summer of Night by Dan Simmons. 5 stars. A group of friends fight evil during summer vacation.


message 43: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Kathy wrote: "1. The Trench by Steve Alten. Rated 3.25 stars. Horror in the ocean. Think prehistoric shark."

That sounds like a fun one, Kathy!


message 44: by Kathy (new)

Kathy  | 32 comments It was! The series is about prehistoric marine animals trapped in the Mariana Trench. This book pitted pehistoric shark against prehistoric crocodile. Man mainly got in the way. I also picked up The Loch by Steve Alten but haven't read it yet. You can probably guess what Nessie is!


message 45: by Adelaide (new)

Adelaide Blair | 60 comments 3) Spiral It's the sequel to Ring, 3/5. It's okay, but not as good as the first book.


message 46: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
2. The Frankenstein Papers by Fred Saberhagen
The story of Frankenstein's "monster" told mainly from two points of view - the subject in a journal and Benjamin Franklin's son via letters to his father. What an ending! I never saw it coming.


message 47: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 967 comments Mod
Dagny wrote: "2. The Frankenstein Papers by Fred Saberhagen
The story of Frankenstein's "monster" told mainly from two points of view - the subject in a journal and Benjamin Franklin's son via letters to his fat..."


Dagny,

Is this book part of a series, or can you read it as a stand-alone?


message 48: by Dagny (new)

Dagny (MadameVauquer) | 1833 comments Mod
The Frankenstein Papers is a stand-alone, Cheryl. I read a lot of Saberhagen's books back in the 60s, 70s and early 80s when I was reading a lot of science fiction. He did several based on old books that have almost become legend (Frankenstein, Dracula, etc.). I think Brian Aldiss also did this and they're fun.

I didn't care for the first few times it shifted narrators. I wanted to stick with the main character, but eventually got used to it.


message 49: by Donna (new)

Donna (weeblackdog) | 58 comments I just picked up We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson a couple of days ago from the library, but didn't have time to read it in October. I'm looking forward to reading it in November anyway--looks like a fun read.


message 50: by Heena (new)

Heena Rathore P. (HeenaRathore) | 1556 comments Mod
3. Strange Weather - 3/5

It didn't turn out to be as spectacular as I was expecting, but was a decent read.


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