Never too Late to Read Classics discussion

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Archive In Translation > 2019 Monthly Planning Site - Classic in Translation

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message 1: by Claire (last edited May 23, 2019 02:01PM) (new)

Claire  | 241 comments We have the classics planned until the end of 2018, but we should starts planning for 2019. All ideas welcome!

January Hunger by Knut Hamsun
February The Bridge on the Drina by Ivo Andrić

March Memed, My Hawk by Yaşar Kemal

April They Were Counted by Miklós Bánffy

May The Radetzky March by Joseph Roth

June Fathers and Sons. Ivan Turgenev

July Penguin Island Anatole France

August Kokoro Sōseki Natsume

September Palace Walk by Naguib Mahfouz

October Dom Casmurro Machado de Assis
and The Things We Used to Say by Natalia Ginzburg

November Little Man, What Now? Hans Fallada

December The Home and the World.Rabindranath Tagore


Suggestions 2020

HUNGARY

Skylark by Dezső Kosztolányi

SPAIN

Doña Bárbara by Rómulo Gallegos

RUSSIA

Dead Souls Nikolai Gogol
or

A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov

Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov

GERMAN

The Collected Novellas of Stefan Zweig by Stefan Zweig

Confusion Stefan Zweig

JAPANESE

The Temple of the Golden Pavilion Yukio Mishima
or

The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea Yukio Mishima

The Woman in the Dunes Kōbō Abe


FINLAND

The Unknown Soldier by Väinö Linna on WWII; or

Under the North Star Under the North Star by Väinö Linna n the first in a sweeping trilogy; or

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson which is short and gentle, and

Kalewala Kalewala: lyhennetty laitos by Elias Lnrot as an epic or hefty?

DANISH - Besides Isak Denisen there is also Nobel winner Henrik Pontoppidan's Lucky Per which is a fairly hefty book too.

ITALIAN

the Italian classic The Bethrothed:, I promessi sposi by Alessandro Manzoni

The Gold-Rimmed Spectacles Giorgio Bassani

DUTCH
Max Havelaar, or the Coffee Auctions of the Dutch Trading Company by Multatuli

SWEDEN
The Long Ships


message 2: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 1367 comments Hunger by Knut Hamsun (Norwegian)


message 3: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Kathy wrote: "Hunger by Knut Hamsun (Norwegian)"

That one has been on my list for ages.


message 4: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6284 comments Mod
Me too!

You can added it to a Month Claire if you like.


message 5: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha Matherne (cajunliterarybelle) | 2478 comments Mod
Sounds interesting. I think I’ve heard of it but never knew anything about it before now.


message 6: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6284 comments Mod
He is a Nobel Prize winner and I believe it was his first work.


message 7: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
Hunger is a relatively short work and a fascinating read.


message 8: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I would like to suggest The Bridge on the Drina by Ivo Andrić and Reeds in the Wind by Grazia Deledda. Both are Nobel Prize winning authors.


message 9: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 1367 comments Those would be great reads, Rosemarie. I have Reeds in the Wind on my TBR and The Bridge on the Drina sounds fascinating.


message 10: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6284 comments Mod
Rosemarie
The Classic Reeds in the Wind by Grazia Deledda is scheduled for a Theme Read in December for the Nobel Prize winning author.


message 11: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
That's good to know. Thanks, Lesle.


message 12: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments I have all your suggestions noted down.


message 13: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
Memed, My Hawk by Yaşar Kemal from Turkey.
This author writes about the poor people who live far from the cities and their efforts to deal with a harsh climate and political corruption.


message 14: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Memed, My Hawk by Yaşar Kemal from Turkey.
This author writes about the poor people who live far from the cities and their efforts to deal with a harsh climate and po..."


Thank you! Sounds interest8ng.


message 15: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Other books that we agreed upon was
Skylark by Dezső Kosztolányi
And They Were Counted by Miklós Bánffy
Is it ok to add them here?


message 16: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Also, I was thinking we could read each month a classic from another country. For example: We could take a classic from China, from Poland, from Brazil, from Japan,...
We could ask the members to name us the biggest classic in their country or we could read the classics we find on some lists.
That is if people would be interested to read a bit outside their comfort zone...


message 17: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
That sounds like a good idea, Claire. We wiil be reading a wider variety that way.


message 18: by Carol (new)

Carol (carolfromnc) | 3412 comments Claire wrote: "Also, I was thinking we could read each month a classic from another country. For example: We could take a classic from China, from Poland, from Brazil, from Japan,...
We could ask the members to ..."


Yes, please.


message 19: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 1367 comments I like your idea, Claire.


message 20: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new)

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 537 comments Mod
The bookshelf is plenty of books from several countries.


message 21: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6284 comments Mod
Claire wrote: "Other books that we agreed upon was
Skylark by Dezső Kosztolányi
And They Were Counted by Miklós Bánffy
Is it ok to add them here?"


Claire you can go ahead and edit them into your first comment if you like.


message 22: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6284 comments Mod
Claire wrote: "Also, I was thinking we could read each month a classic from another country. For example: We could take a classic from China, from Poland, from Brazil, from Japan,...
We could ask the members to ..."


I also like that idea, Claire and if we find an unknown author maybe we can feature the Author under the Diversity in Authors as well. I think it will make us very diverse in our Classic Reads! :)


message 23: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Rafael wrote: "The bookshelf is plenty of books from several countries."

I know and it is a great source. But I was hoping to get a bit more involvement for the bookshelf too for some lesser known countries..


message 24: by Brian E (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments Today's authors' birth and deaths that Catherine now posts lists Naguib Mahfouz Nobel winner from Egypt. I only know him from mentions on here, especially his The Cairo Trilogy: Palace Walk / Palace of Desire / Sugar Street.
Somebody who knows more about him can talk about whether he is a good fit for the group but, if so, we could just use Palace Walk.
Claire was looking for 'some lesser known countries.' Well, Egypt is pretty well-known but I thought this still might be what she was looking for.


message 25: by Brian E (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments Also, while I would love to read both the April and May choices, since they are both Hungarian authors, should you possibly separate them from each other by a few months? I'm fine the way it is but, though I sometimes urge it that way, this group is not all about meeting my desires.


message 26: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I like the idea of separating the Hungarian authors, Brian. I have been wanting to read another of Manfouz's books and have heard many good things about Palace Walk.
What do you think Clare? We are still in the planning stages for 2019, so the schedule be revised as we need to.


message 27: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
The Albanian author Ismail Kadare wrote a number of novels. I have already read Chronicle in Stone so am suggesting Broken April or any other of his books suggested by our members.


message 28: by Brian E (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments I know we are looking for different countries, but there is still German, Russian and French language books. I am interested in The Radetzky March by Austrian Joseph Roth. I'd like to read Stefan Zweig but, with his variety of good books, I suggested Author of the Month status where we can pick a book.

We did Master and Margarita last year, so maybe 19th century Russian, one of these 3 standards:
Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev
Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol or
A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov

There's still French. Or another South American or Japanese. With Bosnian, Hungarian, Turkish, and possible Albanian, and Egyptian authors, we are still in a close geographic area, albeit much ignored.


message 29: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I am glad you mentioned The Radetzky March, Brian. It is a book that is often overlooked.
When we were in Berlin, my husband and I ate in the Joseph Roth restaurant, which also sold all his books. We had a good lunch and I got a collection of his short stories to take home.
I would not have found the restaurant without google, since Berlin is huge.


message 30: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments I would love the Radetzky Mars. I’ll add it.
Which Russian book you think best to add?


message 31: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments As to Kadare: his books are not old enough for our reads, I think. Or is it different for Turkey?


message 32: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I forgot about the year of publishing. You are correct, Claire. They are too new.


message 33: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I have read all three of the Russian books and we could use A Hero of Our Time or Fathers and Sons, since Dead Souls was never finished.


message 34: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 384 comments A few more suggestions:
- Penguin Island by Anatole France
- Little Man, What Now? by Hans Fallada
- Confusion or The Collected Stories of Stefan Zweig by Stefan Zweig. I've only read his novella Chess Story and really liked it.


message 35: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
Penguin Island is an entertaining and creative book.


message 36: by Brian E (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments We've done 2 Japanese classics, Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata and The Makioka Sisters by Jun'ichirō Tanizaki and I think it might be good to include one per year in the Classic in Translation. Some books by different authors to consider would be:

Kokoro by Sōseki Natsume (1914)
The Temple of the Golden Pavillion (1956) or The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea (1965) - both being shorter than Spring Snow (1968) all by Yukio Mishima
The Woman in the Dunes by Kōbō Abe (1962)

If not Japan, but still Asia, we could do a not-long novel by an early Nobel winner:

The Home and the World by Rabindranath Tagore (1916


message 37: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments I would say: lets us take for Russia Fathers and Sons.
For Japan, what if we take Kokoro?
And the two suggestions: Penguin Island and Little Man, What Now?. Also we can add The Home and the World.

I can put the other suggestions in for next year. I think we should at least add a south american book and a book from the middle east or africa. Anyone has any suggestion?


message 38: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I will think about books from those regions and see if I can find any titles to recommend, Claire.


message 39: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 384 comments For South America, how about Dom Casmurro by Machado de Assis (Portugese)? Written in 1899.

One I can recommend, that I read this year, is Doña Bárbara by Rómulo Gallegos. I thought it was fabulous! It's considered a classic in Venezuela and is required reading for students.


message 40: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments For me both seem ok! Any preferences for someone?

I have added all the choices in the post on top. If we put sout america in, the year is full. Eventually we couldmove the Hans Fallada book to next year and add a book from Africa or the middle east.


message 41: by Brian E (last edited Dec 25, 2018 06:24PM) (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments I've given too much input, but after reading the above comments here's some more:

1. Africa includes Egypt and earlier I suggested Palace Walk by Egyptian Nobel winner Naguib Mahfouz for an African entry:

2. If you add that you could move my early suggestion of Skylark by Hungarian Dezső Kosztolányi to February of 2020. We already have a Hungarian novel this year and though I own Skylark, and really want to read it, I have just enough willpower to wait 6 more months until early 2020 to read it, in the interest of geographic diversity.

3. Thank you for choosing Fathers and Sons, which I already bought, and the older Kokuro, which sounded like a good one to me.


message 42: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Brian wrote: "I've given too much input, but after reading the above comments here's some more:

1. Africa includes Egypt and earlier I suggested Palace Walk by Egyptian Nobel winner [author:Naguib..."


Thanks Brian, you’re right! I completely lost it out of my sight.


message 43: by Carol (new)

Carol (carolfromnc) | 3412 comments Kokoro and Palace Walk are excellent picks. I’m looking forward to our 2019 discussions.


message 44: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
That is a great list, Claire.


message 45: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 384 comments I love this list! I’m doing a Translated Lit (with different languages) challenge in 2019 so these books are perfect! For South American, I prefer Dom Casmurro because I haven’t read it BUT does anyone else have a preference?? I could do a reread of Dona Barbara.


message 46: by Brian E (last edited Dec 25, 2018 07:43PM) (new)

Brian E Reynolds | 4008 comments I liked the idea of Dom Casmurro, but only because it was 176 pages and Dona Barbara was 474 pages. But I know nothing about the books. Now that I've checked I see that Dona is respected as the main Venezualan classic.
I suggest that, since Pam nominated them both, go with Dom Casmurro in 2019, which is Pam's preference, and have Dona Barbara join Skylark in 2020 when Pam will be more ready for a reread?


message 47: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8928 comments Mod
I think that is a good idea, Brian. I read Dom Casmurro almost two years ago and would be interested in hearing what other readers think about it.
I do want to read Dona Barbara in the future as well.


message 48: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 384 comments Brian - Sounds good to me! I forgot that Dona Barbara was on the long side. It didn’t seem so long since I was reading it the same time as Lonesome Dove, which was really long!


message 49: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 241 comments Thank you all for the help!


message 50: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 384 comments Thank you Claire! I’m new to the group and looking forward to participating in some group reads!


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