Pulp Magazine Authors and Literature Fans discussion

42 views
Common reads > Doc Wilde Invitation and Offer

Comments Showing 1-24 of 24 (24 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Tim (last edited Aug 18, 2009 06:34AM) (new)

Tim Byrd (timbyrd) | 48 comments Hi, folks.

I have a proposal for you.

I am, as many of you know, a newly published novelist. Putnam released my book Doc Wilde and The Frogs of Doom in May, and it's designed to be enjoyed by both adult and kid readers (in much the same way films like The Incredibles or the Indiana Jones movies are).

I haven't officially announced the news yet, but the response to the book has been so positive that Putnam has decided to make Doc Wilde a series (it's been the tentative goal, but they waited to commit till they saw the reviews and sales). My agent and editor are hashing out the details on a contract for the next two books right now.

In the spirit of pulp solidarity, I'd like to offer my book up as a community read. I did so before, but concerns about library availability and other things sidelined it as a possibility in favor of older, more widely available works.

This time, I'm going to bribe you.

I'll send the first twenty folks who request it a PDF copy of the book, with my terms detailed below. [UPDATE: Upon reflection, not knowing what demand may be like, if there are more than twenty requests, I'll pick twenty randomly to get the file.] I know reading a book onscreen can be a pain, but my book isn't long (186 pages) and is a very brisk read with short chapters, so it's easy to read in multiple sittings.

Here are the terms of this offer; if you don't care to go along with them, or don't think you'll be able to due to time or other issues, please don't request a copy, as it will keep it from someone who might like to participate.

Note: This offer is good for current members of this group only, i.e. people who have been members prior to August 19th, 2009.

If you get a copy:

1. You commit to participating in the group discussion of the book. There's no set rules on participation, I only ask that you actively consider the work and comment on what you like or don't like about it. I'm very interested in what people have to say. Naturally the discussion is open to all, not just those who receive the PDF file.

2. Within a month after reading the book, you commit to writing a review of it to be posted on Goodreads, and if possible, Amazon/Borders/Barnes & Noble if you have an account with one or more of them and are able to review there. The only standard for this review is it should say something about the book, if only a paragraph's worth of impression, not just be a star rating.

3. If you like the book, you consider buying a copy, either for yourself, as a gift for someone else (for a kid, particularly, to keep the pulp tradition alive, but for an older adventure fan is fine too), or even as a donation to your local library or school library. The more books that sell, naturally, the better the chances that the series will continue to grow.
If you buy a copy directly from me, I'll inscribe it for you or whoever it's meant for. If you buy from another source, let me know and I will send you an inscribed bookplate to stick in the book.

To take me up on the offer, just drop me a line through Goodreads. I'll send the file out once I have the twenty requests (and if we don't reach twenty, I'll assume interest isn't high enough to proceed).

For more info about the book, visit the website listed in my signature. Among other info, you can find an excerpt, some cool art in the gallery, and a page summing up the critical response so far. I also invite you to sign up for the upcoming newsletter, which will not only include up-dates on Doc Wilde news, but a regular "Doc Wilde's Cliffhanger Survival Tips" feature.

Best,

Tim Byrd
www.DocWilde.com
Home of the Frogs of Doom!


message 2: by Werner (new)

Werner Tim, I won't take you up on your offer of a PDF copy, because I don't like to read books electronically, and printing it out would use a lot of paper. :-) If the rest of the group is amenable to picking it for a group read, that's fine with me; but it presents me with a bit of a quandary. On the one hand, your book has been on my to-read shelf for ages (it looks like it's right up my alley!); and when one of my groups picks something I want to read anyway as a common read, I usually try to participate. On the other hand, I've got a string of five books in mind to read for the rest of this year, which are things I've either promised people I'd read, or know that somebody's anxious for me to read it. :-) (As you can tell, I don't get half as much time to read as I'd like!)

I'll commit to this: if we go with Doc Wilde's first adventure as a group read, I'll get a copy by ILL after the first of the year, and will review it here on Goodreads. By then, of course, the group read will be officially over; but the discussion thread will still be here, and I'll just chime in then with my two cents worth. :-)


message 3: by Tim (new)

Tim Byrd (timbyrd) | 48 comments Hi, Werner.

Sounds good to me.

One thing I want to clarify, though. I didn't mean to push my way into having the book be the "official" group read, but rather to have a side conversation about it (unless people did opt to make it the group read, which would of course be fine).

Best,

Tim
www.DocWilde.com
Home of the Frogs of Doom


message 4: by John (last edited Aug 19, 2009 11:30AM) (new)

John Mayer | 66 comments I’ll buy yours if you’ll buy mine! It’s soon to be released under the H. Harksen impress. A smaller publishing house, to be sure, and my own work has not yet met with acclaim (though that’s practically a sure thing). Then we could write blurbs for one another.

I’ll be happy to buy your book when finances permit. I’ve also promised Stephen Hunt to buy one of his, which I think tend to be steampunk. I haven’t been able to figure out what the time frame is for your book, except that it’s post Tucker. I read a bit of it at the DocWilde website, and it looks great. I’m sure kids won’t get the pulp allusions, but perhaps they’ll like the story all the better thinking this is a genre all their own.

To tell you the truth, I never heard of Doc Wilde before this group, and then thought that must be Farmer’s name for his Doc Savage character, which I’d forgotten. It is, of course, much closer in form and meaning to Savage than is Caliban. I’m assuming your Doc Savage-inspired tales will take quite a different tack than did Farmer’s.

Like the other Tim, I don’t care for reading long works online, and printing it out would cost me as much, probably, as the book’s purchase price, cartridge costs being what they are. And I won’t buy anything from Amazon due to their support of dog and cock fighting (you can find more info on the web, or write me at my own website http://www.vset.net [not here, as I don’t want Steve to ban me:]). And I’d like to have your autograph anyhow. So I’ll get it from you. As soon as my job hunt bears fruit. I only just got my license.

Looking forward to reading it. And, from what I’ve seen, it would be optimal for readers to involve young folks of their acquaintance. This just might join Rowling's work as a reason for kids to read.

BTW, your frogs look a lot like I imagined Karl Wagner’s toad creatures, vomerine teeth and all. Since I’ve linked to my Cinnamon Bear art, I might as well offer a link to my own Bufonoid of Doom: http://www.hiredhand.org/Illustration...

Yours truly,
John Mayer



message 5: by James (new)

James Bojaciuk | 6 comments I'm in.
I loved the first novel in the series. (Even if the relationship between "Grandpa" and Pat was a little...off putting. I also noticed some other Farmer theorys in there if I'm not mistaken.) In fact, I enjoyed it enough that I'm writing a very long article on your novel. (It most likely won't be less than 20-odd pages.)
The other literary references were fun. Although I do have to wonder how many in the under twenty age group, other than me, were able to catch them.
You're also the first author after Lovecraft who was able to make the Deep Ones--Sorry, Leep Ones--be more scary than yawn inducing.
So good luck with the second novel, hopfully I get into the twenty pre-readers.
Also, I am more than likely to order a hard copy of the second book as well. E-copies lack the touch and smell of the real thing.
Best,
James Bojaciuk



message 6: by Werner (new)

Werner So, did we decide to do Tim's book as a common read for September? Or (September being almost a third of the way over by now) for October? What's your pleasure?


message 7: by Tim (new)

Tim Byrd (timbyrd) | 48 comments John wrote: "I haven’t been able to figure out what the time frame is for your book, except that it’s post Tucker. I read a bit of it at the DocWilde website, and it looks great. I’m sure kids won’t get the pulp allusions, but perhaps they’ll like the story all the better thinking this is a genre all their own..."

John, it's set in the present, though through a pulp/Deco filter.

Both kids and adults are loving it, and I've heard from some parents that reading Doc Wilde has sparked an interest in their kids in reading Doc Savage and other pulps. I try to encourage this, for all readers, through the reading list at the Doc Wilde site.

I love your own Frog of Doom. Or Toad, rather. Great picture of Kane, too.

I don't know if you know this, but I knew Karl, myself. Way back in the day, I'd hang out with him at cons, and we'd chat regularly on the phone. He was always great fun, as you know, and very encouraging to a young writer.

I was wondering recently, is there any chance of his books being reprinted through POD services? Certainly whoever has control of the rights could easily set up a Lulu account and hell, you'd be the man to supply the art. Many writers are putting their own books back into print this way. It's a damn shame Karl's work is so hard to get hands on at humane prices.

Best,

Tim
www.DocWilde.com


message 8: by Tim (new)

Tim Byrd (timbyrd) | 48 comments James wrote: "I loved the first novel in the series...In fact, I enjoyed it enough that I'm writing a very long article on your novel...You're also the first author after Lovecraft who was able to make the Deep Ones--Sorry, Leep Ones--be more scary than yawn inducing...."

I'm glad you enjoyed it, and look forward to reading that article. Be sure to get me a copy.

You said you found the Clark/Pat relationship off-putting. But I never said the Wildes are cousins. Even if they're taken as literal Savage analogs, there's conflicting info in the pulps about how close a cousin Pat really is, and the modern understanding of the dangers of cousins mating has led to marriage being allowed most places in the world.

There's a piece about it at The Straight Dope( http://bit.ly/h6yxE), part of which reads:

First-cousin marriage isn't a surefire recipe for congenital defects. True, marriage among close kin can increase the chance of pathological recessive genes meeting up in some unlucky individual, with dire consequences. The problem isn't cousin marriage per se, however, but rather how many such genes are floating around in the family pool. If the pool's pretty clean, the likelihood of genetic defects resulting from cousin marriage is low. A recent review (Bennett et al, Journal of Genetic Counseling, 2002) says that, on average, offspring of first-cousin unions have a 2 to 3 percent greater risk of birth defects than the general population, and a little over 4 percent greater risk of early death. While those margins aren't trivial, genetic testing and counseling can minimize the danger. An argument can be made that marriages of first cousins descended from strong stock can produce exceptional children.

And I'd say that the Savages and the Wildes are very strong stock indeed.

I'm glad you liked my treatment of Lovecraftian critters. They were fun to play with. And they will likely return.

Best,

Tim
www.DocWilde.com


message 9: by Tim (new)

Tim Byrd (timbyrd) | 48 comments Werner wrote: "So, did we decide to do Tim's book as a common read for September? Or (September being almost a third of the way over by now) for October? What's your pleasure?"

Actually, Werner, if the response to my offer is any indication, most folks either don't know about the book or don't care to read it. So for now it looks like a no-go as an official read (though I'm willing to discuss it with all who are interested in its own threads).

The people who asked will still get their e-copies, and I still request they review the book and consider getting a physical copy either for themselves, someone they know, or a library or school.

Best,

Tim
www.DocWilde.com


message 10: by Werner (last edited Sep 10, 2009 06:36AM) (new)

Werner Okay, Tim, that tells me what I need to know. As for me, I'm still looking forward to reading your book (in print form :-)) sometime after the first of the year --or sooner, if I can. I'm also a Lovecraft fan, so the mention of "Lovecraftian critters" above whetted my interest even more!


message 11: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (thomasroche) | 5 comments It's a bummer there hasn't been more response here -- Tim's book is a hoot, and it's an easy read but has lots to talk about in it. In the context of this group I think it'd be a great choice for a group read! I recommend it.


message 12: by Werner (new)

Werner Well, Thomas, I could be up for it --if we'd do it in December, I'll commit to taking part in the discussion. (Of course, so could anyone else who reads it in the meantime --"common reads" don't necessarily mean we all read it simultaneously, since people read at different speeds anyway. :-)) I'd recommend doing it earlier, except that I might be involved with a common read in one of my other groups in October and November --that schedule is still pretty fluid.


message 13: by John (new)

John Mayer | 66 comments Tim wrote: "John wrote: "I don't know if you know this, but I knew Karl, myself. Way back in the day, I'd hang out with him at cons, and we'd chat regularly on the phone. He was always great fun, as you know, and very encouraging to a young writer."
No, I didn’t know, Tim. If any of your encounters with Karl you thing might be of general interest, I am collecting people’s memories of him on the Wagner website I maintain at http://www.karledwardwagner.org. So far, I’ve been disappointed in how hard those are to come by.

Considering how devoted Karl was to pulps, and his efforts at preserving and popularizing pulp fiction in many ways, including his own Carcosa publishing house, this might be a good place to mention the upcoming Karl Edward Wagner Horror Festival Planning Dinner this October, the Saturday after the anniversary of his death. It will be held at Patrick Sullivan’s in Knoxville’s Old City. This was built as a saloon (and bordello) by the gentleman of that name, but for a while it was a second-hand shop and used book store, and both Karl and I bought a number of our literary treasures there.

We plan on dining at 7. Sullivan’s, in addition to spirits and beer, has a pretty good menu (which includes at least one vegetarian entrée). If anyone’s interested I’ll post directions.

Steven, does this merit a category of its own?

Yours truly,

John Mayer





message 14: by John (new)

John Mayer | 66 comments And, Tim, I have every intention of purchasing your book. Like many since late last year, I’ve been living hand to mouth, focusing on buying groceries and keeping the lights on (and internet connected). But I figure prosperity is just around the corner.


message 15: by Steven (new)

Steven Harbin (stevenharbin) | 86 comments Mod
John,
To answer your question about the upcoming Karl Edward Wagner Horror Festival Planning Dinner I think that it can and should definitely be a category of it's own. If you wish, you can start it or if you prefer I'll do so, but I do think this group and the other networks would be good places to talk it up.
and
Tim,
I bought your book when it first came out, and I would love for it to be a group read for October - what does the rest of the group think?
Also, I apologize for not posting more often to the group, sometimes the pace of everyday life leaves me spent ... no excuse however...


message 16: by Werner (new)

Werner Steven, no apology necessary --we've all got busy lives, and know how it is! I don't post as much as I'd like to either --I can't find anybody who'll write me a paycheck for reading/being on Goodreads full-time. :-) (Bummer!)


message 17: by Werner (new)

Werner Hmmmmm! I checked World Catalog for Tim's book yesterday, and the good news is that some 312 libraries in the OCLC sytem have copies. The bad news is that it was published in 2009 (I know, Tim indicated that above --but somehow I was thinking it had come out in 2008!). That'll be a hurdle if you're trying to get it by interlibrary loan; so my advice is to start putting in your request(s) early!


message 18: by Chompa (new)

Chompa | 1 comments I'd love to give this a read. I think it is great to have books like this aimed at the young adult market.


message 19: by John (new)

John | 2 comments James wrote: "I'm in.
I loved the first novel in the series. In fact, I enjoyed it enough that I'm writing a very long article on your novel. (It most likely won't be less than 20-odd pages.) ..."


Any chance of you sharing that article in the discussion of the Doc Wilde book going on now? I'm really intrigued to see your ideas about it. Might get people chatting more than they're doing so far too.


message 20: by James (new)

James Bojaciuk | 6 comments John wrote: "Any chance of you sharing that article in the discussion of the Doc Wilde book going on now? I'm really intrigued to see your ideas about it. Might get people chatting more than they're doing so far too. "

I'm happy to share my thoughts--and the information that would make up the article. But, since I'm sogged with college apps and school homework, the articel will have to wait some months sadly...

Anyhow, it'll be a Wold Newton type paper. So if that sort of thing bothers you, look away.

Still here? Good. The basic premise of the article is that Doc Wilde is the son of Doc Caliban. (Of course, if you already think that Savage and Caliban are the same person, the point is mute.)

I was also going to dig into the relationship between the frog cult that Conan killed in "A Witch Shall Be Born" (And how the priests from that story link to the villainous Skull Face) relates to the "key" from "The Thing on the Roof." I then try to track the Key's movements to the point where it ended up in Doc Wilde's hands.

The final subject I plan to cover is the Deep One's movements from their origins in the Pacific, to Innsmouth, to the west coast of America. Then, finally, in the 1970s when they took over much of the nation of Hidalgo.

If anyone's interested in any of my reasoning in this, just ask.

I'm also considering doing a sequel to my Fu Manchu in Pop Culture article based around Doc Savage. If I do that, rest assured that the Wildes will be featured heavily.

Best,

James



message 21: by James (new)

James Bojaciuk | 6 comments Tim wrote: You said you found the Clark/Pat relationship off-putting. But I never said the Wildes are cousins. Even if they're taken as literal Savage analogs, there's conflicting info in the pulps about how close a cousin Pat really is, and the modern understanding of the dangers of cousins mating has led to marriage being allowed most places in the world.

Huh, learn something new every day.

I don't have a problem with the relationship as you handled it--even if the characters are treated as the true Doc and Pat Savage.
What bothered me was more of a lingering aftertaste of Farmer's versionn of the relations between the two of them. Normally I love Farmer's work, though, there is just something that bothers me about how he shows it--go figure.

I'm looking forewards toward the next Doc Wilde book, does it have a release date yet?

Best,

James





message 22: by Werner (new)

Werner James, what's a "Wold Newton type" paper? That's a term I haven't run across until now. (The idea for your paper, as you explain it above, sounds fascinating! :-)


message 23: by James (new)

James Bojaciuk | 6 comments Werner wrote: "James, what's a "Wold Newton type" paper? That's a term I haven't run across until now. (The idea for your paper, as you explain it above, sounds fascinating! :-)"

It's a bit tough to describe, but it's basicly a paper treating various fictions as part of the same universe, then exposing the connections between them. The term was coined in a sort of homage to Philip Jose Farmer's Wold Newton series of novels and stories.

The best way to really explain it is with examples. Some of the best articles are:

The Daughters of Tarzan: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Ar...

The Secret History of Captain Nemo: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Ar...

The Legacy of Hanoi Shan: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Ha...

There are also some articles that, rather than being connective, are purely informational.

English-Mangani Dictionary: http://www.pjfarmer.com/woldnewton/Ma...

Keep in mind if you dig further, that the quality between articles varries crazily, most are quite good, but some are near incomprehensible.
There are a few other sites out there with articles, but some of those have wild theories about the pulp characters.

Happy Reading,

James






message 24: by Werner (new)

Werner Thanks, James; I'd thought, from the context, that it might be something like that, but this gives me a solid explanation. And thanks for the links, too!


back to top