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World & Current Events > Is the US everyone's or just American?

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16042 comments Clearly world leadership has a toll. It's probably impossible to export American culture, films, corporations, products and all, occupy world's headlines with American headlines and then expect ppl to not be involved..
Locally, at their own countries, people may not even know their own politicians, head of opposition, key ministers/secretaries, but they do - Donald & Hillary, Bob Muller & John Bolton and maybe a few more. Who really knows names around the globe except for an occasional head of state?
US stance on political, economic and other issues does have a global influence, but more than that - the exposure it gets from 'selling' its way of life, values and similar stuff.
So, taking the US back from non-Americans, may feel a little unexpected -:)
What do you think? Do you know your local politicians better than those in the US?


message 2: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Williams (houseofwilliams) Honestly, no. I know a fair deal about Canadian politicians and our political history, but I find that that pales to what I know about What's going on with US politics at any given moment. It is part and parcel of being Canadian and being exposed to American media so much. But it also has to do with needing to know what's going on with our biggest trading neighbour and the worlds superpower directly to our south. As former PM Pierre Trudeau (father of our current PM Justin Trudeau) famously said, "Living next to the United States is like being in bed with an elephant."


message 3: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments We're currently changing PMs faster than some people change their undies... (The memes are fabulous, however.)

Australian politics is currently in a state of chaos - at least amongst the major parties - which may have some interesting repercussions at our next federal election. What those repercussions will be is anyone's guess.

Personally, because I live in a smallish rural community, I know our current state member, and rather like his ex-wife (who was more of his political currency than he has realised, I think - never does to leave your wife unexpectedly for another woman just after you've been elected), and his major opposition is actually our local mayor, who I know well enough to say hello to at events and in the street.

In terms of US politics - well, it's pretty hard to ignore things like Trump.

In terms of culture, I find that the infiltration of US culture into our own mainstream a bit annoying at times. Simple things - like replacing 'biscuits' with 'cookies' are really irritating to me. Probably reflects some of my own parochialism.


message 4: by Holly (new)

Holly (goldikova) As a US citizen, I can say that I know my local politicians because that is the only level in which I participate in politics. I can name the members of our Board of Education, City Council, County Commission, county department heads, and our representatives in the state house and senate. I only know one of our two US Senators.

As for our 'culture'......why would anyone outside the US want it? i live here and I don't want anything to do with it. Well, Coca-Cola, but I prefer the Coke bottled in Mexico because they use cane sugar and in the US it is made with corn syrup.


message 5: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments As a US citizen who has had occasion to visit many places outside of the United States, I can say that our culture is widely copied and has affected many other cultures.
Culture is best appreciated in retrospect. The hot turmoil of current fads seem unworthy of the title culture. Viewed in retrospect, they will seem to have unappreciated virtues.
I would classify myself as a political observer rather than active participant. I have not spent a lot of time thinking about local politics. I do have friends and neighbors who hold or have held positions at town, county and even national level. I got to know more of them the past couple of years because I had to undertake a massive project to fix major problems on my property.
As part of the repair project, I decided to put in the driveway that the original owners decided was an unnecessary expense. The county forced me to procure thousands of dollars worth of licenses and apply for a variance to get the driveway.
I take more of an interest in national politics because they cost me more and they have a profound affect on the lives of my children and grandchildren.


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11771 comments As a NZ citizen, since it is a small country, and possibly because I have travelled a lot, I take interest in quite a bit of foreign politics. Added to which, I am involved with a company making skin care products that we want to sell elsewhere, so trade policies of various countries are important. Politics in Australia we regard as bizarrely turbulent, in the US just plain bizarre right now, Brexit is a clear issue, and China is simply opaque.

As for culture, TV and movies are mainly US, some British, a little Australian and a little of ours. The biggest movies made here tend to be based on foreign origin, e.g. LOTR. Our writing is basically UK, but US sneaks in here and there. Because we are small, we are probably more international in our thinking than people in most countries.


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Holly, what is it about our culture that you don't want anything to do with? Culture is defined as "the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively."


message 8: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Ian, why is Brexit a clear issue? I don't know much about it, but I'm willing to be enlightened.


message 9: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Politics in Australia we regard as bizarrely turbulent,

We Australians think this too. And we wish our elected representatives would get on with the running of the country rather than the feathering of their own nests/power mongering for personal gain/remaining out of touch with their electorates...

Brexit is weird - but a clear indicator of what apathy and fearfulness can do in a matter of national importance.


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11771 comments Brexit is a clear problem for us, Scout, because we trade with both Britain and Europe, and there ear egging not be complications through different laws. I agree the details of Brexit are probably very murky for those involved, particularly since the UK parliament does not seem to be able to get its act together. It started off as an accident - Cameron called the vote "knowing" which way it would end up - except he was wrong. Oops!


message 12: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2328 comments Ian wrote: "As a NZ citizen, since it is a small country, and possibly because I have travelled a lot, I take interest in quite a bit of foreign politics. Added to which, I am involved with a company making sk..."

What about Canadian entertainment? We're seeing more and more of our television coming out of Canada...Vancouver is like a second Hollywood right now!


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11771 comments Yes, we have seen some TV programs made in Canada. Not a lot, but some. However, a lot of those that I have seen do not really involve Canadian culture - or maybe I don't recognise it any longer :-(


message 14: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16042 comments J.J. wrote: "What about Canadian entertainment? We're seeing more and more of our television coming out of Canada...."

Plus they have a whole bunch of Justins - Bieber & Trudeau to mention, so I guess Canadian influence grows -:)


message 15: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Simply asking about the spread of 'American' culture is in my opinion symptomatic of a problem that I would call close to arrogance: the tendency of many Americans to think that their culture is superior and should logically be adopted around the World by other countries. Well, I am sorry but all countries/ethnic groups and populations already have their own cultures, many of them dating back thousands of years, while the USA has existed for less than three centuries. When I was working at the Canadian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, in the early 1980s, I and other Canadian attachés visited the American embassy (before it was blown up) for a reception. There, an American embassy secretary, hearing me and another Canadian speak French, asked us 'Why do you speak French?', to which I responded that it was my native tongue and that of most Quebecers. Her reply was 'Why use French? English should be enough for everybody!'. And that was a State Department secretary! Maybe Americans should realize that their 'culture' is not superior and they should show more respect towards other peoples' culture.


message 16: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Williams (houseofwilliams) @J.J. More and more shows and movies are being filmed in Vancouver and Toronto these days, but they aren't necessarily Canadian productions. US studios use these locations to shoot American-produced movies. And while it's a sweet deal, it's not the same as seeing Canadian-made entertainment.


message 17: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Williams (houseofwilliams) @Ian: what Canadian shows do you get there?


message 18: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11771 comments @Matthew. There do not seem to be any running currently. I have seen some previously that acknowledged Canadian funding, or part funding, although I suspect there was a lot of US involvement there. Sorry but I can't do better. If you list a few I can tell you whether I recall seeing any of them here.


message 19: by Mike (new)

Mike Takac | 27 comments Michel wrote: "Simply asking about the spread of 'American' culture is in my opinion symptomatic of a problem that I would call close to arrogance: the tendency of many Americans to think that their culture is ...

Well, I am sorry but all countries/ethnic groups and populations already have their own cultures, many of them dating back thousands of years, while the USA has existed for less than three centuries...."


It is not so much the spread of the US culture, but unbeknownst to many, it’s the beginning of a natural evolution towards a global culture, which is not the same as a global government!

True, many cultures are “thousands of years” old where the evolution of those cultures took place in geographical regions isolated by vast distances, mountains, oceans, etc. The US culture is simply a migrating blend of those many cultures over two hundred plus years. In that short time, what came from this cultural blend, was the telephone, controlled flight, the internet, the smart phone, the lightbulb etc.; not only to lighten up the world, but made it a lot smaller.

Today, we are now living in a global neighborhood, where one may know and communicate with someone thousands of miles away, more than knowing one’s next-store neighbor. Such ease in communication and jet travel for the masses is just a number of decades old. This new neighborhood is going through growing pains in the evolution of a global culture. In units of generational time, the future will study cultural diversity as a historical curiosity.

What unites all cultures are the physical laws of nature. One of those laws in nature, where everyone should come to know, is known as the physical constructal law (the law of evolution). The following introduction outlines this constructal law relative to social evolution:
https://www.academia.edu/37021128/Sci...


message 20: by Michel (last edited Sep 04, 2018 07:20PM) (new)

Michel Poulin Mike, what you said about modern communications helping to create a sort of global culture was correct, to a point. That 'global culture' is only being added to the existing national and ethnic cultures, it is not replacing them. Take Japan, for example: it is a highly techologically advanced country, yet Japanese culture is still very different from American culture.

Where I find your reasoning and argument frankly weak is when you are trying to link cultures with the physical laws of nature, while the link you provided is in my opinion totally irrelevant and proves nothing about your assertion. Cultures are about human nature, history and psyche. They have nothing to do with physical laws of nature. I am sorry, but your arguments just don't wash.


message 21: by Mike (new)

Mike Takac | 27 comments Michel wrote: "Mike, what you said about modern communications helping to create a sort of global culture was correct, to a point. ... yet Japanese culture is still very different from American culture....

Where I find your reasoning and argument frankly weak is when you are trying to link cultures with the physical laws of nature...."


Thank you Mike for your reply.

As for the “Japanese culture,” I know many US citizens whose ancestors are from Japan (two or more generations ago) who are comfortably accustomed to the US culture compared to that of their ancestors. The same is true with my Eastern European ancestry, I know about their culture from a historical curiosity, but it is not my reality.

The ease and magnitude of human migration throughout the world today is new compared to the recorded history of humanity. And on that note, we could only project such migration over many human generations in the evolution of a global civility will strive to provide greater access to its currents, that is, the currents of happiness guided by the constructal law. The US culture is an example when blending many cultures.

The ease and magnitude of human migration generates dendritic patterns, the footprint of the constructal law, where those patterns are found throughout the universe.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-NDw...

The constructal law states, “For a flow system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve freely such that it provides greater access to its currents.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/1...

In other words, any free flowing continuum will generate dendritic configurations guided by the constructal law. For example, the continuum of humanity flowing within the matrix of the laws of nature, having freedom in the evolution of understanding, provides greater access to the pedagogic currents of nature, results in changing configurations of philosophy, culture, markets, and scientific understanding, etc.; generating dendritic patterns guided by the physical constructal law all superimposed on the same area (the globe) and in the same volume (the brain).


message 22: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11771 comments I am happy to have a weak association of physical law with human behaviour. As an example, in one of my novels I had advanced aliens fascinated by sociodynamics - how societies change with imposed constraints. This should work because the mathematics are similar to those used in physics, BUT there are major differences. Taking Mike's example of migration, the argument is that people move as a consequence of a potential gradient. It might be that people are trying to move from central America to the US because incomes are better and the standard of living is much higher in the US. As long as that potential remains, people will want to move. Similarly, as sea levels start to rise, people will move. But of course, you cannot take this analogy too far. Unlike in electrodynamics, there is no simple potential and it does not have a strict mathematical function. It is a feeling, and that will be stronger in some people. However, the history of a place will not stop people moving if the present is bad.

This will probably maintain considerable cultural differences because different cultures put different values on different things, so the "wants" can be filled in different ways. I think the reason American culture is being spread so much is because there is so much of it. If you want to go to a movie, most of your choices at a given time are American made. Similarly with pop music. Sure there are contributions from other countries, but not enough to make that sort of impact.


message 23: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16042 comments As much as someone's willing to export their culture, there are those who eagerly import it. After all it's always your choice to order McDonald's or sushi -:)


message 24: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2328 comments Matthew wrote: "@J.J. More and more shows and movies are being filmed in Vancouver and Toronto these days, but they aren't necessarily Canadian productions. US studios use these locations to shoot American-produce..."

So you're distancing yourself from Sharknado? :D


message 25: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin I would be ashamed for producing a stupidity like Sharknado, no matter which country produces it!


message 26: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Michel wrote: "I would be ashamed for producing a stupidity like Sharknado, no matter which country produces it!"
I did a dramatic reading of "The Prophet" at Camp Zama outside of Tokyo for a Japanese friend and a walk-in audience 50 years ago.
What have you done that you are proud of?


message 27: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Michel, sorry about the rude American at the embassy. There are rude people everywhere. I don't think America is intentionally imposing its culture on the rest of the world. As Ian said, "I think the reason American culture is being spread so much is because there is so much of it. If you want to go to a movie, most of your choices at a given time are American made. Similarly with pop music. Sure there are contributions from other countries, but not enough to make that sort of impact." And, as Nik said, "After all it's always your choice to order McDonald's or sushi -:)" Let's be clear about the definition of culture, which is "the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively." It's up to the people in other countries to partake or not. There's no coercion.


message 28: by Michel (last edited Sep 07, 2018 06:21AM) (new)

Michel Poulin Joe wrote: "Michel wrote: "I would be ashamed for producing a stupidity like Sharknado, no matter which country produces it!"
I did a dramatic reading of "The Prophet" at Camp Zama outside of Tokyo for a Japanese friend and a walk-in audience 50 years ago.
What have you done that you are proud of?..."


Joe, I am at a loss about why you are asking me that. First off, in my military career, I repeatedly risked my life to help and protect others in Lebanon, when I was serving there as an unarmed diplomatic attaché, something for which I got the Canadian Chieff of Staff's Commendation. As a writer, I have written up to date 20 novels, all but one of them written in English, which is a second language for me, and put them online for free, so that others around the World could enjoy my stories, rather than for monetary purposes. As of now on Goodreads, my books have accumulated a total of 206 ratings and an average rating of 4.17. On Free-Ebooks.net, where I also publish my books, I have now gathered over 130,000 downloads and I am their fifth most popular fiction writer. So, I do have a few things that I am proud of, Joe, on top of having raised two good boys.


message 29: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Scout, thank you for the kind words. I do recognize how spread around the World the American culture is and do not oppose or resent it. My only negative point about it was how some Americans (a minority) that I met claimed it to be 'superior' to other cultures. However, where culture is concerned, I believe that quality will always beat quantity. All countries in the World have great artists, scientists and architects who contribute to culture. More than ever, as Mike Takac said, electronic communications helps to spread all those cultural elements around our planet. There is no 'superior' culture, just 'culture'.


message 30: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Michel wrote: "Joe, I am at a loss about why you are asking me that. "
I was curious.


message 31: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2328 comments Scout wrote: "Michel, sorry about the rude American at the embassy. There are rude people everywhere. I don't think America is intentionally imposing its culture on the rest of the world. As Ian said, "I think t..."

Every once in a great while I'll happen to catch some world music program on PBS. Granted they're probably showing the best from the region, but there are some rappers in Africa who are every bit as talented as American rappers, and it makes you wonder why they're not trying to break into the American market...or why they don't get noticed in the American market. I got caught up with some woman singing one night, and I was lost on the cultural references she made between the songs...then I found out she was South African...


message 32: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Not sure what to say about that, but I do know that America is open to the culture of other countries - art, music, literature.


message 33: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Scout wrote: "Not sure what to say about that, but I do know that America is open to the culture of other countries - art, music, literature." I beg to differ. America expects everyone to conform. Rock and Roll was not seen as a widening of the cultural experience. It was rebellion against established norms. Country and Rap are not seen as equal cultural options Their supporters never cross over and enjoy a new experience. Opera and Kibuki are not viable art forms in this country.
Football, Hockey and baseball thrive while soccer and cycling struggle for survival.
Native Americans are faced with the choice of either adapting the standard culture or eking out a living in traditional cultural settings.
Hispanics are seen as invaders who must be repelled.


message 34: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Rock and roll, as well as country and rap, are an integral part of American culture. Native American and Hispanic cultures have also become an integral part of American culture. Let's be clear about the definition of culture, which is "the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively." Culture has nothing to do with politics.


message 35: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Hi Scout, that's interesting, I would define culture more broadly to include the sum of all human activity within a society.

Hence including political activity.

I.e. Ancient Greek use of democracy is as much a cultural expression as their sculpture.


message 36: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments You might want to look up the definition of culture. It has nothing to do with political activity.


message 37: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Scout wrote: " Let's be clear about the definition of culture, which is "the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively." Culture has nothing to do with politics."
Indeed let us be clear. Per Merriam Webster (you can look it up on-line)
"a : the customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of a racial, religious, or social group; also : the characteristic features of everyday existence (such as diversions or a way of life) shared by people in a place or time

popular culture

Southern culture

b : the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization

a corporate culture focused on the bottom line

c : the set of values, conventions, or social practices associated with a particular field, activity, or societal characteristic

studying the effect of computers on print culture

Changing the culture of materialism will take time … —Peggy O'Mara

d : the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations"

We also might want to think about subculture "an ethnic, regional, economic, or social group exhibiting characteristic patterns of behavior sufficient to distinguish it from others within an embracing culture or society"
We disagree because you believe that all of the subcultures coexisting on the North American continent have been fully "integrated" into one overarching culture. That doesn't square with every day experience. They coexist often snarling with fangs bared and claws extended.
And what about counter culture(s) "a culture with values and mores that run counter to those of established society."
Are they legitimate cultures? Have they been integrated into your American culture?
What does cultural identity (The part of a person's self-conception and self-perception and is related to nationality, ethnicity, religion, social class, generation, locality or any kind of social group that has its own distinct culture)?
Do you think of yourself as Euro-american? Italian-American? German-American? African-American? Hispanic-American? Navajo? Sioux? other? None of the above?
What was the last opera you attended?
Have you ever been to Pine Ridge or any other Reservation?
How well do you speak Spanish?
The main thing that I saw in the definitions of culture was values. What are the values that guide a person through life?



message 38: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16042 comments Joe wrote: "We disagree because you believe that all of the subcultures coexisting on the North American continent have been fully "integrated" into one overarching culture. That doesn't square with every day experience. They coexist often snarling with fangs bared and claws extended..."

Joe, do you say that in your opinion the cohesion between different ethnic groups is minimal? From the outside Snoop Dogg or Lucy Liu look as American as Tom Hanks and Larry Bird -:) But it's from the inside what matters.
On a general note I believe there are always tension between assimilation and preservation of one's own ethnic identity/uniqueness. Does the melting pot work while allowing the diversity?


message 39: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Nik wrote: "Joe, do you say that in your opinion the cohesion between different ethnic groups is minimal?.."
That is probably overstating it. I live in PG county Maryland, one of the most racially diverse places in America. The town I live in has a quite diverse population. The majority of the people I socialize with on a regular basis are African American. We are friendly. We talk about football, basketball, the weather sometimes we share life experiences. But there is often a palpable divide.
There are certainly racially based experiences of cultural. I had a conversation on an airplane with a gentleman several years ago. I told him that I remembered from my HS days when the first African American schoolboy started at third base of a white HS team. His response "I remember when there were separate bathrooms for blacks."
I was recently a member of a writer's group. I was for all intents and purposes the token white at the meetings. We generally to along although there were some clashes. There were several very talented writers in the group and I usually enjoyed their work. They gave me generally good marks for my submissions and they came up with valuable critiques. But there were consistent differences in our themes and characters. My characters were normally Euro-Americans. Theirs were almost always African Americans. When they did incorporate a Euro-American, he was almost always a one-dimensional place-holder dedicated to making life miserable for poor African Americans. Sometimes he was a buffoon along the lines of Amos and Andy.
A few pieces fantasized about Nate Turner returning to lead a rebellion against white Americans. Once piece featured a protagonist with white blood in his veins that was making him sick and causing him to commit crimes and giving him a shared guilt in all the crimes white people have committed over the centuries. He was raped by two white cops whom he in turn killed.
Just to be clear, I thought the writer had a very good style and I was impressed with his dramatic presentation but I couldn't take the anti-white rants.
In the larger world, we have had a rash of Euro-American cops killing unarmed African American males. This phenomenon has several cultural implications.
It is interesting that the evening news often features the death of a young African American male or female. If the perpetrator is African-American, the community is heart-broken, looking for justice and answers but calm. If the perpetrator is Euro-American the community is out in the streets protesting.
There is strong anti-Hispanic sentiment in some parts of the community. We have had a couple of instances in which men and/or women who have been living in this country as good citizens for decades have been deported because they entered this country illegally. Generally, they have friends and neighbors here who are horrified by the event. But there are also people who take the self-righteous stance that they should have been evicted a long time ago. "They should have come here legally like my grandparents did."
Then we have Native Americans who are certainly cultural outliers in some cases. Many Native Americans, Billy Mills, for example, have integrated into the mainstream. Ben Nighthorse Campbell served in congress from 1987 to 2005. His views on Native American issues are certainly not the same as a typical Euro-American's views. I recently read about Navajo who is an elected representative from New Mexico but has been attacked because some people believe that he is Hispanic.
I will finish with an observation that you probably cannot fully appreciate. You, and Gaeme and other from England, Australia and New Zealand believe that you have a great understanding of President Obama and his shortcomings but you have no idea why my views are different from yours.


message 40: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin What are exactly your view of President Obama, Joe? Negative, positive or mixed? I am not sure what your views are here on the present political situation in the U.S.A..


message 41: by Joe (new)

Joe Clark | 165 comments Michel wrote: "What are exactly your view of President Obama, Joe? Negative, positive or mixed? I am not sure what your views are here on the present political situation in the U.S.A.."

My views are positive. I suppose you could put them down as mixed because nobody is perfect.
On the subject of the greatest president, Arthur Schlesinger opined that JFK would have found it laughable that people thought he was a candidate for that title. According to Schlesinger, his friend did not think he had done that great a job. There is plenty of evidence to support that assessment. He completely mishandled the ex-pat invasion of Cuba that became the Bay of Pigs. He was tentative on Civil Rights.
Many contend that his increase of military presence in VN led to the Vietnam War. Johnson simply followed Kennedy's lead. I disagree. I believe the available evidence leads to the conclusion that Kennedy would have withdrawn from South Vietnam in '65 if he had not been assassinated. Eisenhower warned Kennedy that he would have to increase military presence in South Vietnam if he expected to hold the country against the Communists. Kennedy did just that from 4000 to 16000. Then there was "Go big or Go Home" meeting, according to Dallek in his biography "An Unfinished Life". Johnson was in favor of "Go Big". It is not clear what Kennedy's position was but after that meeting, he began talking about withdrawing from Vietnam after the 64 election. That was the last discussion he had with his team before the fatal trip to Dallas. He had already issued an executive order to withdraw 1000 troops by the end of 1963.
I don't intend to debate the issue but only point out the difficulty of assessing a President and his term in office. jFK is my favorite president. I think of Obama as a very similar man and president. Dallek's preface says, "The result is not a sharply negative portrait but a description of someone with virtues and defects that make him both exceptional and ordinary - a man of uncommon intelligence, drive, discipline and good judgment on the one hand and of lifelong physical suffering and emotional problems on the other."
For me personally, the key issue was economic recovery. My retirement savings were virtually wiped out by the economic collapse in 2007 - 2008. They had recovered nicely by the time I retired 2011. How much of that is attributable to Obama is debatable and will be debated longer than I will live. But for me, Obama's approach was better than the alternative.
I did not agree with the ACA because I believe that health care insurance in driving the cost of health care. But it was better than nothing (Going back to Richard Nixon's attempts to solve the problem). Clearly it achieved some success because attempts to repeal the act have so far been fought off even with a Republican majorities in both houses of Congress.
When I voted for Obama, I expected him to get us out of Iraq and Afghanistan. I was well aware of the sleight of hand movement of troops out of Iraq and back into Afghanistan. My daughter and her husband are both career military and have served multiple deployments in those theaters. That is probably my biggest disappointment.
I am perhaps a victim of an observation made in 1972. I read that Nixon had manipulated the economic situation to make sure that take-home pay was robust on the theory that as long as Americans had money in their wallets they would be happy with the administration. Nixon was re-elected. I move all of my retirement funds into a variable annuity at the end of 2011. The value rose 20% early on and then dropped back to about 10% more than my initial deposit. It has stayed there for the last 4 years. I have not changed my investment strategy over that period of time and I have seen nothing to lead me to believe that I could do materially better of the long term. So looking out from under the rock where I dwell, nothing has changed for the better since Obama left office.
Hope that answers your question.


message 42: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 6151 comments Well, Joe, as I've said previously, if you want people to hear what you have to say, putting it in a long, confusing diatribe isn't the way to go. Who wants to wade through all that? Not I. Be succinct.


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