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Group Reads 2018 > Nominations for November 2018

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message 1: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
We are looking for nominations for any sci-fi novel or collection of short stories written between 1920 and 1939 that has not previously been read by the group. Please check the bookshelf here & the nomination rules before nominating a book.


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
I'll nominate Gladiator by Philip Wylie. It's SF, but was very influential in the creation of Superman, Doc Savage, & all comic book heroes. I think a lot of space opera draws from it, too.


message 3: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 165 comments I renominate Lost Horizon by James Hilton:
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


message 5: by Rory (last edited Sep 02, 2018 07:39AM) (new)

Rory (oldcolt) | 4 comments I nominate The Chessmen of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4...


message 6: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
Rory wrote: "I nominate The Chessmen of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs"

Oleksandr posted the sort of book link we'd prefer & I changed yours to it.

We typically don't want to read a book in the middle of a series unless it stands alone well. In this instance, the group has already read A Princess of Mars, the first book in the series, & this one does stand well enough alone, IMO. Does anyone disagree?


message 7: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 165 comments I don't have a problem with this group reading The Chessmen of Mars.

As an aside, I sense an implicit assumption about novel series which is false. The assumption is that the story of a novel series runs chronologically. Beginning--Middle--End.

A counter-example to that assumption is a famous SF series--the Foundation novels by Isaac Asimov. The series starts in the middle, goes forward. But the last Foundation novel that Asimov wrote, Forward the Foundation, is the beginning of the story, chronologically speaking. Hari Seldon who is alluded to in all the other novels is the protagonist in the last novel.

And I had no problem with the order of the Foundation novels.


message 8: by Dan (last edited Sep 02, 2018 02:57PM) (new)

Dan The pre-link Goodreads message said the GoodReads poll was for works published 1920-1929, but message one above says 1920-1939.

Using the latter date, I'd like to nominate Triplanetary by E.E. "Doc" Smith, originally published in Amazing Stories in four parts January through April 1934. Triplanetary is the first in the Lensman series. It is said there is a strong resemblance between the Lensman and the Green Lantern Corps of DC Comics fame.

This book is one of those that are either loved or hated. There is no middle ground. At the risk of sounding elitist, I've heard it said, and I agree, that those who have not read this really cannot consider themselves knowledgeable regarding science fiction history. Lensman was the runner-up for the 1966 Hugo award for Best All-Time Series, having been beaten out by Asimov's Foundation.


message 9: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
Dan wrote: "The pre-link Goodreads message said the GoodReads poll was for works published 1920-1929, but message one above says 1920-1939...."

I think you mean the broadcast message. Yeah, it looks like I screwed that up. Should be 1920-1939. I also forgot to put in the link to the current discussion topic. I didn't have a checklist, but created one this time through. Hopefully I'll get it right if I have to do it again. I hope Jo or Cheryl will, though.


message 10: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
Ronald wrote: "As an aside, I sense an implicit assumption about novel series which is false. The assumption is that the story of a novel seri..."

Glad you agree & no, it's not an assumption. That's why we wrote the rules to allow them & I made the point. Some series really suffer if you don't start with the first book, but many others don't have that problem. It can be a tough call on some or to know if you haven't read the series, though.

Most important, it can put people off to see a book is 5th in a series which is why the rules also asked people to make a case for it if the book wasn't the first in a series. Remember, you're not just nominating a book, but selling it to the group. You want them to read your nomination so it's good to say something about why we should want to read the book, too.


message 11: by Keith (new)

Keith (twofarwest) | 4 comments I’ve read most if not all Edgar Rice Borough’s Martian series. I read only the first two in chronological order. After that I read them as I could get a hold of them. Once you know the basic concepts from the first book, I think they can be read in any order. Each book stands by itself.


message 12: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) Good to know, Keith, thank you.


message 13: by Jim (new)

Jim  Davis | 231 comments Jim wrote: "I'll nominate Gladiator by Philip Wylie. It's SF, but was very influential in the creation of Superman, Doc Savage, & all comic book heroes. I think a lot of space ope..."

Very good story. Read it 5 or 6 months ago.


message 14: by Jim (new)

Jim  Davis | 231 comments How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie.


message 15: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
Jim wrote: "How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie."

We read it 3 years ago.


message 16: by Dan (new)

Dan Jim wrote: "Jim wrote: "How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie." We read it 3 years ago."

Too bad. Maybe you would like to nominate another of Thea von Harbou's works, Jim? She wrote about forty books during her lifetime. Sadly, only four have been translated into English, one of which is a recent translation. All are easily available in reprints.

1. The Indian Tomb (1918, translated in 2016)
2. Metropolis (1927, translated in 1927)
3. The Spy (1928, translated in 1929)
4. The Rocket to the Moon (1928, translated in 1930)


message 17: by Jim (new)

Jim  Davis | 231 comments Jim wrote: "Jim wrote: "How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie."

We read it 3 years ago."


Sorry, I didn't know about checking the bookshelf first.


message 18: by Jim (last edited Sep 12, 2018 02:14PM) (new)

Jim  Davis | 231 comments Dan wrote: "Jim wrote: "Jim wrote: "How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie." We read it 3 years ago."

Too bad. Maybe you ..."


Dan wrote: "Jim wrote: "Jim wrote: "How about "Metropolis" by Thea von Harbou? She was Fritz Lang's wife and the novel became the screenplay for the famous movie." We read it 3 years ago."

Too bad. Maybe you ..."


It looks like only "The Rocket to the Moon" qualifies as SF. The description I read makes it see like a pretty straight forward trip to the moon story with no moon monsters in sight. The movie made from the novel includes discovering gold on the moon and typical human violence as a result. I don't know if that came from the book. It doesn't seem to have the deep social consciousness dealing with a class system resulting from mechanization all told in the language of German expressionism. I think reading "The Rocket to the Moon" might be a big letdown.


message 19: by Jim (last edited Sep 12, 2018 02:09PM) (new)

Jim  Davis | 231 comments I just realized from the comments above that the range includes the 20's and 30's. The trouble is finding a book to nominate that I haven't read or at least haven't read in the last 20 or 30 years. My favorite stories of the 30's are Philip Wylie's "When Worlds Collide" and "After Worlds Collide" and the episodic fix-up "Voyage of the Space Beagle" by A. E. van Vogt, mainly for the great story "Black Destroyer".


message 20: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 4281 comments Mod
Jim wrote: "I just realized from the comments above that the range includes the 20's and 30's. The trouble is finding a book to nominate that I haven't read or at least haven't read in the last 20 or 30 years...."

Jim, in a nomination topic like this, you need to read the very first message. That lays out the requirements & has links to the bookshelf where you'll see what we've read for this period.

When you find a book you want to nominate, please make it clear & put in a link to the book using the 'add book/author' link above the comment box. If you wanted to nominate "Gladiator" by Wylie, you'd click on the link & put "gladiator, wylie" without the quotes & click on the search button. Then click on the add button to the right of the correct book. In this case, it's the first one so would look like this: Gladiator.

That way when we scan the topic for books, we can see it clearly. If you bury it in a bunch of text or aren't clear on the single book you want to nominate, we might miss or goof.


RJ - Slayer of Trolls (hawk5391yahoocom) | 718 comments Dan wrote: "The pre-link Goodreads message said the GoodReads poll was for works published 1920-1929, but message one above says 1920-1939.

Using the latter date, I'd like to nominate [book:Triplanetary|4449..."


I second Triplanetary. I've already got a copy on my shelf.


message 22: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) The rocket to the moon, Lost Horizon, and The Voyage of the Space Beagle are the only books that I see that didn't get their links properly posted. Therefore I'm closing this thread and creating the poll.


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