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Picture of the Day > September 2018

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message 1: by Heather (last edited Sep 01, 2018 05:01AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Without colors, the artist can do little to convey a mood in painting. Imagine if Van Gogh had no yellow pigment for his Sunflowers or if the Impressionists had no ultramarine. The moods of such paintings would be very different. In this regard, let’s look at what is traditionally associated with each colour and how these colours have been used in painting.

How Green in Used in Painting



The Green Man and Vegetation

Green has strong associations with environment, regrowth, and the natural world, Rousseau’s jungle scene Surprised! conveys the wildness of nature. Monet’s The Water Lily Pond, brings about an airless yet spacious feel. Green is also seen to be a colour, of hope, equanimity and the democratic. See the backdrop in Holbein the Younger’s The Ambassadors, the figures in front of which are on a quest to keep the church united.

https://sites.google.com/site/science...

Green is no longer just a color. It's now the symbol of ecology and a verb.

Since the beginning of time, green has signified growth, rebirth, and fertility. In pagan times, there was the "Green Man" - a symbol of fertility. In Muslim countries, it is a holy color and in Ireland, a lucky color. It was the color of the heavens in the Ming Dynasty.

Today's greens can be found in a wide range of objects: pea soup, delicate celadon glazes, sleazy shag carpet, sickly bathroom walls, emeralds, wasabi, and sage. The English language reflects some strange attributes: Would you rather be green with envy, green behind the ears, or green around the gills? (Idiomatic American English for extremely envious, immature or nauseated.)

Global Meanings of Green

-Green is universally associated with nature.

-Green symbolizes ecology and the environment.

-Traffic lights are green all over the world.

Unique Meanings of Green in Different Cultures

- In China, Green may symbolize infidelity. A green hat symbolizes that a man's wife is cheating on him.

-In Israel, green may symbolize bad news.

- In Japan, the words for blue and green ("ao") are the same.

- In Spain, racy jokes are "green."

Luck or Bad Luck?

- Green is a lucky culture in most Western cultures. A green shamrock symbolizes this.

-You won't find many green cars at racetracks because they are considered unlucky.

- Circus and traveling showmen in Australia may consider green to be bad luck.

-An old English rhyme about wedding colors: "Married in green, Ashamed to be seen."


https://www.colormatters.com/the-mean...

Alright, 'secret theme' exposed!
I would be interested to know: To what meaning do you attribute each painting posted this month?


message 2: by Heather (last edited Sep 01, 2018 05:01AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments
The Indian Church
Emily Carr
1929

Canadian poet Kate Braid comments "[Carr] added a breath of danger. In the final painting, Indian Church, dark slices of undergrowth rush like waves up to the front door of the small white church. And yet it stands, holding its cross like a wobbling Christian soldier, almost burning with a clear interior light — a Lawren Harris light — against the green waves that threaten to drown it."..

..."a dense wall of forest engulfs the church, which Carr paints in vivid white, a stark contrast to the dark forest. Against this backdrop the church is miniaturized, signifying both the incursion and the vulnerability of the new beliefs introduced by the settler population." (Art Canada Institute reviewer Lisa Baldissera) Baldissera also comments that the crosses surrounding the church indicate an effect similar to "time-lapse photography", symbolising the movement of the cross at the church steeple as if it were falling and multiplying to mark the graves on the side of the church. According to the reviewer, the crosses also symbolise the parishioners and also serve to signal the failed mission of the church. Baldissera also comments that "[t]he building’s windowless walls and reduced features create another “marker,” suggesting a structure that is both monolithic and uninhabitable."

Ann Davis comments that Carr, at the time of the painting's creation, was interested in finding out more about the nature of God and the methods she could use to portray that nature in a painting. Davis remarks "The flat front of the building and the geometric crispness of its shape contrast markedly with the organic volume of the tree boughs and the shallow recession into the forest. Yet somehow there is accommodation between nature's house and God's house. Neither one entirely overpowers or dominates the other."

Margaret Hirst comments: "...The foliage forms a subtle totem-like facial profile nudging the right side of the steeple, suggesting Carr’s transitional religious frame of mind and her mission to unite God and nature."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ind...



message 3: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

No 15 (Two greens and a red stripe)
Mark Rothko
1964


“When I was a younger man, art was a lonely thing. No galleries, no collectors, no critics, no money. Yet, it was a golden age, for we all had nothing to lose and a vision to gain. Today it is not quite the same. It is a time of tons of verbiage, activity, consumption. Which condition is better for the world at large I shall not venture to discuss. But I do know, that many of those who are driven to this life are desperately searching for those pockets of silence where we can root and grow. We must all hope we find them.”

― Mark Rothko


message 4: by Heather (last edited Sep 04, 2018 11:42AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Green Landscape
Marc Chagall
1949

"When Matisse dies," Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, "Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what colour really is"


message 5: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Pablo the opinionated.


message 6: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Portrait of Lydia Delectorskaya, the Artist's Secretary
Henri Matisse
1947


message 7: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Green Garden
Claude Monet
1897-1899


“My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece.” Monet


message 8: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments IS THIS A BORING THEME? Be honest and I will choose something else. I'm trying to make it interesting, maybe you all are way too busy. I know a couple people have already commented to that situation. Let me know!!! I would appreciate more comments people! One from Geoffrey, thank you.

Aside from this question, I hope everyone is doing as well as possible and trying (and even succeeding) at enjoying life! You are still welcome in the group and I think you're all great!


message 9: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Untitled
Andrew Wyeth
1983


message 10: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

The Assassination of Fletcher Christian
Andrew Wyeth
1940


message 11: by Heather (last edited Sep 06, 2018 10:30AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

In the Orchard (Helga)
Andrew Wyeth
1973





In the Doorway
1984





The Helga Mystery
By Virginia Butterfield

"Her face has the luminous glow of good health. Her body—whether wrapped against the cold in a loden coat or lying nude by a window with the curtains blowing—is the body of a sturdy peasant. A German immigrant, she worked on a farm near Andrew Wyeth’s Pennsylvania home, cooked and cleaned for his sister Carolyn and, for 15 years, modeled for the famous painter. And all that time Wyeth hid the work away, showing it to no one. Not even his wife of more than 46 years (who is also his business manager) knew of its existence...

And then one day in the spring of 1985, Wyeth unexpectedly showed his cache of Helga portraits and sketches to a visiting interviewer, Jeffrey Schaire of Arts & Antiques magazine. Shortly thereafter, Wyeth flew to his other home in Rockland, Maine, where his wife, Betsy, met him. Shaire describes what ensued. As they were driving home from the airport, they came to a dip in the road, and Wyeth told Betsy that for 15 years he’d been working on a series she’d never seen. “All I really remember is that dip in the road,” Betsy said...

Paintings and sketches hanging on every wall, piled on tables, propped against posts—240 works in all. Temperas, drybrushes, watercolors, pencil sketches—and all of the same woman. According to Schaire, Andrews was viewing “the mystery of a great painter’s most intimate obsession, one of the best-kept secrets in the history of American art.”...

The works are vibrant with detail. Letting Her Hair Down focuses on wayward strands of shiny flaxen hair straggling against bare shoulders—such inspired realism, you can almost feel how it tickles her skin. A series of watercolors (In the Orchard) puts Helga in a caped coat and boots, sometimes in a snow-sprinkled winter scene, sometimes in the lush green of a spring meadow. In the kneeling nudes (On Her Knees), Wyeth floods the body with light and lovingly traces each strand of the braided hair. The serene, sleeping nudes (Overflow) are almost a definition of quiet. In Refuge, the final watercolor of the suite, Helga leans against the darkened bark of a tree, once again in her loden-green coat, this time with collar upturned and gazing downward. It’s a series that intrigues...

But why 15 years of secrecy? The story had the makings of a juicy scandal, and the press, as well as the art world, took it up immediately. Betsy did little to still the rumors (perhaps deliberately—she is reputedly a shrewd manager). In fact, she added a fillip of suspense when she described to a reporter that the portraits were about love. Some suggest that since publicity inflates the market value of art, Betsy’s hint of an affair was cleverly calculated to do just that.

Wyeth mildly, and with wry Yankee humor, responded that all painting is about love. To the Newsweek reporter he said, “I mean, you’re painting rocks, or you’re painting an animal, or a tree, or a hill, but you should love it.”

Others defended the artist in varying ways. His sister, Carolyn, told Newsweek, “He’s got more on his mind than sex. Andy’s an artist. He paints subjects; he does not go to bed with them.”

A former model, Siri Erickson, told Time magazine: “He would get totally involved in his work. It was as if you were a tree. He’s a normal, everyday person. He does paint good, but he’s just Andy.”

One good friend remarked that both Andy and Betsy have “a marvelous way of teasing.”...

But why did he never show the paintings to anybody, even his colleagues, instead stockpiling them in an attic over such a long period of time? Wyeth has explained that by showing a work in progress, he fears a stoppage of momentum and of emotion. “I don’t want to stop that train of thought,” he said in Arts & Antiques. “If they like it, you’re stopped, and if they dislike it, you’re stopped—either way.”

He told Newsweek, “The more eyes you let see what you’re doing while you’re working, it saps from it, and it saps from my imagination, too.” When Wyeth felt ready to show the Helga paintings, he knew he was finished working on them. The series was complete...

But what about Helga? Who was she? Reporters besieged the small town where the Wyeths reside, looking for clues. But Helga’s identity remained closely guarded. It is said that two Dobermans were set in her driveway to discourage intruders. She was married; that much was known. She had at least two children (some said four). She had shown great kindness to another neighbor, Karl Kuerner (another subject of Wyeth’s paintings), during the time of his final illness. She was not a person who would enjoy media attention. Helga Testorf was 38 when Wyeth started painting her; she was 53 when he closed the series...

More... http://www.sandiegomagazine.com/San-D...



message 12: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3286 comments Hi Heather,

No No not boring! I wanted to reply on the Monet (one of my favorites).
But Wyeth is great also.
And though the Helga mystery is no news for me it's still an intriguing tale!

I like this painting:



The paintings of Helga inspired a lot of people:

https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2017...


message 13: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Dirk wrote: "Hi Heather,

No No not boring! I wanted to reply on the Monet (one of my favorites).
But Wyeth is great also.
And though the Helga mystery is no news for me it's still an intriguing tale!

I like ..."


I think it is so interesting how many years he painted her! He caught her aging and I think she is still beautiful.


message 14: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3286 comments Coming back on the Monet.
The garden is still there, and open for visitors.
The only problem is that you're never alone there ;-)
I think it's one of the most visited tourist places in France, or in any case right behind the Louvre, the Eiffel tower or Mont st Michel






message 15: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Cool! I would have liked to have seen that, though, like viewing the Mona Lisa, it’s anticlimactic when there are so many people. How far is it from Paris?


message 16: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments The first picture of Wyeth´s is the only one I immediately recognized belonging to him without checking his name tag. I have always had mixed emotions about his work. His sensitivity is amply evident. I only wish he were less conventional in his painting style.


message 17: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3286 comments Heather wrote: "Cool! I would have liked to have seen that, though, like viewing the Mona Lisa, it’s anticlimactic when there are so many people. How far is it from Paris?"

Giverny is halfway between Paris and Rouen, about an hour and a half drive. You can by tickets on line for a private car and no waiting at the entrance. But they are a bit expensive.
I think there is always a long cue and the fee for the garden and the house is about 80€.


message 18: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Dirk wrote: "Heather wrote: "Cool! I would have liked to have seen that, though, like viewing the Mona Lisa, it’s anticlimactic when there are so many people. How far is it from Paris?"

Giverny is halfway between Paris and Rouen, about an hour and a half drive...."


Thanks, Dirk!


message 19: by Heather (last edited Sep 07, 2018 08:04AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

The Eye of Silence
Max Ernst
1943

The Eye of Silence is a view of what appears to be a calm, reflective lake surrounded by green and brown shapes that simultaneously suggest foliage, stone ruins, and natural rock formations. In the right foreground sits a sphinx-like human figure; the background sky is filled with dark, ominous clouds. Marked by a frozen, poetic, even eerie sensibility, Ernst's painting is meant to be not direct or literal but provocative and suggestive, inciting investigation of symbols, imagery, and emotions stored in the human psyche that the imagery evokes.

Ernst was one of the first artists to apply Sigmund Freud's dream theories investigate his deep psyche in order to explore the source of his own creativity. The pervading artistic strategy in Max Ernst's oeuvre is to recycle visual material and combine it into new imageries. While turning inwards unto himself, Ernst was also tapping into the universal unconscious with its common dream imagery.


http://www.max-ernst.com/the-eye-of-s...


message 20: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments This is the first time I've seen Ernst's "The Eye of Silence" and I find it very uncomfortable to look at. Surrealist art work is not my cup of tea, but then again I can appreciate a good painting.

Am I the only one who feels that way? Does anyone else find it uncomfortable?


message 21: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Ahhh I didn't see Freud there :P Now I would really like to know.


message 22: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Heather wrote: "IS THIS A BORING THEME? Be honest and I will choose something else. I'm trying to make it interesting, maybe you all are way too busy. I know a couple people have already commented to that situatio..."

Heather, is it possible for you to add the details about the paintings as 'spoiler. May be it's just me (then, never mind) I like to interpret the paintings on my own. It's more interesting that way.


message 23: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments In response to your comments, Amalie, I happen to really like Surrealism. It’s one of my favorite movements actually. I like to interpret the various paintings.

I try to include the information on the pages I find the paintings and I’ve added some comments onto some of the posts. Not many Surrealism paintings have interpretations. I think the artists intend it that way? Anyone else know more?


message 24: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Surrealism means “beyond the real”. It isn’t supposed to make sense. It’s like the dream you have that seems entirely logical until you wake up and realize how crazy it was. But the human mind insists on trying to make the world make sense so we try to do that with Surrealism , too.


message 25: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Surrealism defines the id in Freudian terminology. Otherwise known as the subconscious, usually coming out of the shadows in the dream state.


message 26: by Amalie (last edited Sep 08, 2018 01:46AM) (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Surrealism defines the id in Freudian terminology. Otherwise known as the subconscious, usually coming out of the shadows in the dream state."

Oh, I didn't know that, really? Now I really want to find why that one bothered me.

(Edit)

I found this online:
Marked by a frozen, even uncanny sensibility, Ernst’s painting suggests imagery and emotions stored in the human psyche while also evoking the artist’s own experiences of violence, dislocation, and alienation during the war.

http://www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/...

In my heart, I am a pacifist. I guess that makes sense.


message 27: by Heather (last edited Sep 08, 2018 04:10AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments I think your psyche could feel the violence, dislocation and alienation that he was feeling at the time of this painting. That would be unsettling.


message 28: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3286 comments I’m a great admirer of Max Ernst and used to make etchings and litho’s using this subconscious technique.
It’s actually quiet fun: take a big size paper put your pencil somewhere at random, clear your mind and let your hand do the drawing.
Most of the time the result is rubbish, but once and a while something appeared that inspired and lead to a drawing that was interesting enough to make an etching.
Mostly these were what you would call imaginary landscapes.


message 29: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments That sounds fun! I’d like to try that sometime.


message 30: by Dirk, Moderator (new)

Dirk Van | 3286 comments It's a bit like doodling, but more serious (not while you're talking on the phone-)
And not on scraps of paper or somewhere in the margin.
You best use drawing paper a bit bigger than A4 size.
I used to do this on big carton boards (takes some time to fill it but it's fine to have some space)


message 31: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Oh okay. Good to know.


message 32: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 386 comments Amalie wrote: "This is the first time I've seen Ernst's "The Eye of Silence" and I find it very uncomfortable to look at. Surrealist art work is not my cup of tea, but then again I can appreciate a good painting...."

I also find the painting uncomfortable to view. There is something about the the dripping acid green that makes me think about a hazardous waste pond full of poisonous chemicals. If he had done the same painting in a different color, such as pink or purple, I probably would have had a different reaction and found it fun and magical. So thanks for having us think about the color green, Heather.


message 33: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Seeing as art is about more than beauty and comfort, discomfort is perfectly acceptable to me.


message 34: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 386 comments Ernst painted it at a very disturbing time--in 1943 during the horrors of World War II.


message 35: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments I thought the same thing about the acid green color. It reminded me of hazardous waste, decayed metal or something.
I didn’t really feel ‘uncomfortable’ looking at it, actually a bit intrigued, but it does make me think of some future world that was taken over and destroyed and this is what’s left to rot.


message 36: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments I remember reading somewhere, before I really got into studying art, once when Magritte was asked what different things meant in his paintings, especially some common recurring themes such as the apple or the pipe, he answered “my paintings don’t mean anything”. At that time I wasn’t as familiar with Surrealism and I thought, “how can an artist make paintings that don’t have a meaning?” But I understand now.


message 37: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Heather wrote: "The Eye of Silence
Max Ernst
1943

The Eye of Silence is a view of what appears to be a calm, reflective lake surrounded by green and brown shapes that simultaneously suggest foliage, stone ruins, and natural rock formations. In the right foreground sits a sphinx-like human figure; the background sky is filled with dark, ominous clouds. Marked by a frozen, poetic, even eerie sensibility, Ernst's painting is meant to be not direct or literal but provocative and suggestive, inciting investigation of symbols, imagery, and emotions stored in the human psyche that the imagery evokes...."


Amalie, now you have me really investigating this painting!
I see what looks like a woman...dead? (above it says she is a Sphinx-like figure). Leaning up against a wall, she is in a different green color ,even her skin has a green tint, but also wears the only other opposite to the color green--red. It is striking against the rest of the painting (lower right corner). And her look of seeming 'dead' goes along with the overall feeling of death and decay of the painting as a whole. I find it interesting that I didn't even notice the only red in the painting until looking at it a few times already because of the focus primarily on the weird green color in the center. Did anyone else have this experience?

And to the far left side, what looks like what once was a stone structure but partly intact, it says "ruins", moss seems to be trying to grow once again against the stone. It seems the only 'lifelike' green color in the painting.

The description talks of a "calm, reflective lake". At first I didn't even see the lake, but when I found it, it does not look reflective in the sense that it makes me 'reflect' or contemplate, but only that it has no ripples and reflects its surroundings. But again, the greenish of the lake looks like it is rather filled with what Connie called "poisonous chemicals" turning it into that green color. It is not serene to me and in this sense, it doesn't create a 'calming' feeling inside. The "dark, ominous clouds" above add to this eerie feeling altogether.

I think as a whole, this painting has a lot of symbolism. That acid green colored 'structure' in the center of our vision against that 'ominous' sky is an unlikely contrast, isn't it! And I don't particularly care for that color of green, especially out in open nature.

Now the painting makes a bit more sense knowing of his surrounding circumstances with the war around him.


message 38: by Heather (last edited Sep 09, 2018 03:10AM) (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Schönbrunner Schlosspark
Gustav Klimt
1916
Austria

In the year 1569, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor|Maximilian II purchased a large floodplain of the Wien River|Wien river beneath a hill, situated between Meidling and Hietzing, where a former owner, in 1548, had erected a mansion called Katterburg. The emperor ordered the area to be fenced and put game there such as pheasants, ducks, deer and boar, in order to serve as the court's recreational hunting ground. In a small separate part of the area, "exotic" birds like turkeys and peafowl were kept. Fishponds were built, too. The name Schönbrunn (meaning "beautiful spring"), has its roots in an artesian well from which water was consumed by the court. During the next century, the area was used as a hunting and recreation ground. Especially Eleonore Gonzaga (1598-1655)|Eleonora Gonzaga, who loved hunting, spent much time there and was bequeathed the area as her widow's residence after the death of her husband, Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor|Ferdinand II. From 1638 to 1643, she added a palace to the Katterburg mansion, while in 1642 came the first mention of the name "Schönbrunn" on an invoice. The origins of the Schönbrunn orangery seem to go back to Eleonora Gonzaga as well... UNESCO catalogued Schönbrunn Palace on the World Heritage List in 1996, together with its gardens, as a remarkable Baroque ensemble and example of synthesis of the arts (Gesamtkunstwerk).
http://www.klimt.com/en/gallery/lands...


Schönbrunn Palace
Schloss Schönbrunn













message 39: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Jon Boat
Thomas Hart Benton
1964


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

Flood
Thomas Hart Benton
1965


message 41: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

After Many Springs
Thomas Hart Benton
1945


message 42: by Lorie (new)

Lorie (lorie_mccown) | 57 comments Heather wrote: "Untitled
Andrew Wyeth
1983"

I love this theme, and appreciate all the hard work you do. Love the art images too.

Lorie


message 43: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Thank you so much, Lorie! You made my day! I’m just glad you’re with us! :)


message 44: by Lorie (new)

Lorie (lorie_mccown) | 57 comments Took a long break from social media. Easing back in a bit.


message 45: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Lorie wrote: "Took a long break from social media. Easing back in a bit."

Take your time, Lorie, I don't plan on going anywhere! I'm glad you're enjoying it so far!


message 46: by Sher (new)

Sher (sheranne) Heather wrote: "The Indian Church
Emily Carr
1929

Canadian poet Kate Braid comments "[Carr] added a breath of danger. In the final painting, Indian Church, dark slices of undergrowth rush like waves up to the fro..."



I am thrilled to see you include Emily Carr's work in your exploration of green. She is one of my favorite artists. I love the contrast between the very structured whiteness and sharp form of the church in front of the very curvy and alive green essence of the trees. It seems like God is in the trees. Life is the trees and the church, I'm afraid, just doesn't do justice to LIFE! Just a few thoughts on this wonderful selection.


message 47: by Sher (new)

Sher (sheranne) Amalie wrote: "This is the first time I've seen Ernst's "The Eye of Silence" and I find it very uncomfortable to look at. Surrealist art work is not my cup of tea, but then again I can appreciate a good painting...."

Hi Amalie -- I actually like Ernst's work, but I have never seen _The Eye of Silence_ before. I find it perplexing. It reminds me of the cover of a fantasy novel without the hero and also suggests "ancient". I look at the date, and I can't help but wonder about the War--and influences related. Sher


message 48: by Sher (new)

Sher (sheranne) Heather wrote: "Flood
Thomas Hart Benton
1965"


My immediate thought here is the hurricane headed toward the Carolinas in the US right now. Aquamarine. Calm and lovely but can be deadly. Water and wind out of control. :(


message 49: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments Very interesting commentary there, Sher! I really like your personal feelings and interpretations of the different works. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.


message 50: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8542 comments

The Green Pitcher
Paul Cezanne
1887


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