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Group Reads > The Quiet Gentleman September 2018 Chapters 1-11

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message 1: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2724 comments Mod
The discussion is divided into three discussion threads: the first thread for chapters 1 - 11, the second thread for chapters 11 - 22, and the spoilers thread for final conclusions and open spoilers about the book. Please remember to use spoiler tags if you post spoilers in the non-spoiler threads!

All right - is anyone reading this for the first time?

How many times have you read it?

What format/edition are you using this time, and what does the cover look like?


Christmas Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4484 comments Mod
I've read it at least 30 times, last time with this group. Hopefully this version The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer hasn't fallen apart!


message 3: by Critterbee❇ (last edited Aug 31, 2018 05:08PM) (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2724 comments Mod
Holy Wowsers, Carol, 30 times!?!

This is my 6th or 7th read, and is another of my favorites.

Reading it on my kindle this time, and my fav cover is not in Goodreads...yet!


message 4: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments This is my third read, I think - I could swear I have the Sourcebooks paperback book, but can’t find it, so I borrowed the e-book from my library and will read on Kindle The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer . This is the same cover from the paperback version I thought I had!


message 5: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I don't know how many times I've read it (but not 30!), but quite a few. I'm very fond of it.


message 6: by Mela (new)

Mela (melabooks) | 71 comments Am I the only one who is reading it the first time?

I possess an Arrow paper edition The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer .

And from the beginning it is so gripping: I see all these people in the Hall, sitting and waiting.


message 7: by Rosina (new)

Rosina (rosinarowantree) I have probably read it something like 30 times - I bought it new in 1966, so it has my maiden name in it. The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer . It really is falling to pieces, but nowadays I listen to the Audiobook more often.

But the paperback is to hand for the discussion.


message 8: by Jackie (last edited Sep 01, 2018 04:36AM) (new)

Jackie | 1385 comments I have read it many times and currently have the paperback at the top of the thread The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer .

the first character we meet is Stanyon Castle "a most interesting pile". It's large and can be uncomfortable, which is how I imagine the Dowager Countess.

it is dramatic, all of them waiting for the new Earl to arrive, and when he does we are shown immediately how they all feel about each other - yet another truly masterful opening.


message 9: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 1810 comments I'll be reading another one from the reissues of the 90's. It'll be a few days until I start but looking forward to it.


message 10: by Moloch (new)

Moloch | 208 comments I'm happy to read this book with you, I think I'll start in the next few days. First time for me.


message 11: by Barb in Maryland (new)

Barb in Maryland | 714 comments This will be my 5th or 6th (??) go round. I first read it back the '60s. This was the paperback I had. The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer
Isn't that a hoot? Young lady, front and center--no matter the title!

I'm waiting for the library to get a copy to me. I think it will be the Sourcebooks edition The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer
You know, the one with the dude dressed in clothes 20 years out of date.
Can't win...


message 12: by Moloch (new)

Moloch | 208 comments >>>>the dude dressed in clothes 20 years out of date

You know, I like those editions! I try to choose them when I can. You're right, they're not very accurate, but they have those curious, "daily life"-like scenes.

I guess the paintings are from late 19th century. Some artist that made nice "old times scenes".


message 13: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments Barb in Maryland wrote: "This will be my 5th or 6th (??) go round. I first read it back the '60s. This was the paperback I had.The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer
Isn't that a hoot? Young lady, front and center--no ma..."


That’s the one I thought I had and can’t find! I dread getting paperbacks from the library, they are often rather sad. When we visited my in-laws and son a couple years ago in central Illinois (they lived there, he was in college), I was very impressed by the local library branch. Not only an extensive Heyer collection of reissued Sourcebooks (the outdated gentleman above), but they had somehow reinforced all the covers with some sort of hard, see-through plastic coating, so they were beautiful and durable! I thought, hmmmm, I could be comfortable here...


message 14: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments From the very beginning, Martin is such a spoiled brat that I just itch to smack him down! What a shame that his parents, the ones who should have taught him better, were (are) such pigs, too.


message 15: by Critterbee❇ (last edited Sep 01, 2018 08:27AM) (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2724 comments Mod
Susan in NC wrote: "Barb in Maryland wrote: "This will be my 5th or 6th (??) go round. I first read it back the '60s. This was the paperback I had.The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer
Isn't that a hoot? Young lady..."


Yes! Filmolux, or something like, really helps extend the life of a book! We put it on all of our paperbacks, trade or mass market. I love the stuff. Our library has some old hardback Heyers, and some new reissued Sourcebooks, but no old paperbacks.


message 16: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2724 comments Mod
Love this book!

Time for me to pop over to the spoiler thread before I forget myself and start spoilering anything, haha!


message 17: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments ❇Critterbee wrote: "Susan in NC wrote: "Barb in Maryland wrote: "This will be my 5th or 6th (??) go round. I first read it back the '60s. This was the paperback I had.The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer
Isn't tha..."


Thank you, I wondered what hat wonder material was - fabulous idea!


message 18: by Susan in NC (last edited Sep 01, 2018 09:02AM) (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments Karlyne wrote: "From the very beginning, Martin is such a spoiled brat that I just itch to smack him down! What a shame that his parents, the ones who should have taught him better, were (are) such pigs, too."

Oh, me too! I mean, being one of the “Smack Martin” contingent...but I like Drusilla (what a name, eh?!)


message 19: by Jackie (last edited Sep 01, 2018 10:54AM) (new)

Jackie | 1385 comments Karlyne wrote: "From the very beginning, Martin is such a spoiled brat that I just itch to smack him down! What a shame that his parents, the ones who should have taught him better, were (are) such pigs, too."

Martin's father I have no desire to meet, but his Mom is one of my "love to hate" people she is so arrogant and clueless. much of the humor is from her character. How she enjoys her "perfect" son and everything Stanyon, she kills me!


message 20: by Louise Sparrow (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 459 comments I've probably read this a half dozen times, it's one I like but not one of my top favourites.

This time I'm indulging a fit of lazyness and letting Alexa read the Kindle version to me. :)

I actually find this a good alternative to an audiobook, she has her quirks and can't replace a good narrator, but can definitely replace a bad one.


message 21: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments Every time I get to the incident of the Indian epergne I start laughing. Miss Morville pointing out the advantages of setting the epergne on a side table and turning it so as to hide "the leaping tiger "in the act of springing upon it's prey" was the best. This Victorian epernge is but a pale imitation of the one at Stanyon Castle.

Sadly it lacks the "group of natives gathered beneath a palm tree, two peacocks and an elephant with trunk upraised". For more views of this epergne including close ups of the leaping tiger see here.


message 22: by Barb in Maryland (new)

Barb in Maryland | 714 comments Oh, Hana! That epergne you found is so fabulously awful! Last time I read the book I made a mental note to go online and track one down and then promptly forgot! I was sure from Heyer's descriptive details that GH must have seen one like it in real life.


message 23: by Barb in Maryland (new)

Barb in Maryland | 714 comments Hmmm, I was able to find one with an elephant; alas, its trunk is down, not upraised.

see here: https://tinyurl.com/ybvv6fb2


message 24: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments Now imagine one maybe ten times larger, with a temple, multiple palms, sepoys, palaquins and the aforementioned elephants, tigers and peacock! Like the Bishop's Bird Stump in To Say Nothing of the Dog I'm not sure anything like it ever could exist :)


message 25: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments That's pretty hideous, too, Barb. I sure wouldn't want to be the poor butler or whoever it was who had to polish either one!


message 26: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2724 comments Mod
Oh my. Those things belong in a museum, not a private residence. Unless the private residence is also a museum...


message 27: by Hana (last edited Sep 02, 2018 10:38AM) (new)

Hana | 652 comments I imagine the epergne might have had much in common with the Albert Memorial. I'm particularly taken by the Africa group:


message 28: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments Thank you for truly breathing life into a scene that’s always tickled my funny bone! Can you imagine trying to converse around those things? I know you used to only talk to those seated to your left or right, but nowadays you’d have to stand up or shout to chat across the table, if we still had those things!


message 29: by Elliot (new)

Elliot Jackson | 275 comments I'm reading the Sourcebook trade paperback edition, which is my go-to on this one. I am so glad we are doing this as a group read right now, as I just re-opened my first serious attempt at Heyer fanfic, which is a re-write of TQG! I found I still liked it after putting it down, so I am going to resume work on it.

This is probably my 6th or 7th read of this one - it's not in my top-tier "must re-read every year" pile, but it's in the second tier, among the "revisit every other year at least!"

Yes, love the set-up in the first chapter on this one - it introduces the Gothic in such a Regency kind of way! : )


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 1136 comments Elliot wrote: "I'm reading the Sourcebook trade paperback edition, which is my go-to on this one. I am so glad we are doing this as a group read right now, as I just re-opened my first serious attempt at Heyer fa..."

This is the edition that I purchased b4 I joined GR, though after joining GR and this group I found out about the GH birthday markdowns for kindle edition and bought it.

Btw, What do you make of the cover? The fellow on the cover looks heart-broken, but I love his suit.


message 31: by Elliot (last edited Sep 02, 2018 04:46PM) (new)

Elliot Jackson | 275 comments Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder wrote: "Btw, What do you make of the cover? The fellow on the cover looks heart-broken, but I love his suit.."


This cover has *always* puzzled me - the Sourcebook covers have always struck me as engaging art with only the most tangential reference, if that, to the contents! This particular grouping makes no sense to me at all!


message 32: by Jackie (last edited Sep 02, 2018 05:16PM) (new)

Jackie | 1385 comments is this the one you mean? The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer


Christmas Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4484 comments Mod
❇Critterbee wrote: "Holy Wowsers, Carol, 30 times!?!

This is my 6th or 7th read, and is another of my favorites.

Reading it on my kindle this time, and my fav cover is not in Goodreads...yet!"


Ha! Don't forget I'm a lot older than you & started reading GH when I was around 11. The bulk of the reads were before I turned 30 though.


message 34: by Elliot (new)

Elliot Jackson | 275 comments Jackie wrote: "is this the one you mean? The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer"


Yes, it is!


message 35: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I just finished Chapter 11, and it brings me to the realization, once again, of how masterful Heyer is. What a treat for those of you who are reading this for the first time!


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 1136 comments Elliot wrote: "Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook..."his cover has *always* puzzled me - the Sourcebook covers have always struck me as engaging art with only the most tangential reference, if that, to the contents! This particular grouping makes no sense to me at all!



Right. Makes no sense. tQG is a Regency novel too. I think the Sourcebooks covers are beautiful, but putting Georgian art on a Regency novel...


message 37: by Teresa (new)

Teresa | 1810 comments Elliot wrote: "Jackie wrote: "is this the one you mean? The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer"


Yes, it is!"


This is the one I have also.


message 38: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments Susan in NC wrote: "...I know you used to only talk to those seated to your left or right, but nowadays you’d have to stand up or shout to chat across the table, if we still had those things! ..."

That was only for large formal dinners, as Miss Morville points out. For small family and friends dinners more general conversation was considered acceptable....but with the epergne was impossible!


message 39: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments Karlyne, you are so right! She builds the suspense masterfully. The incident in Ch. 10 (view spoiler)


message 40: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Hana wrote: "Karlyne, you are so right! She builds the suspense masterfully. The incident in Ch. 10 [spoilers removed]"

Yes! Just loping along, laughing at the characters and their foibles, and (as my goofiest grandboy would say) then, "wait, whaaat?"


message 41: by Hana (last edited Sep 04, 2018 08:38AM) (new)

Hana | 652 comments My reaction, exactly! There was so much humor that I was completely disarmed (view spoiler)

My favorite early scene was in Chapter 3 when the epergne was unveiled in it's new setting and Miss Morville comments (view spoiler)


message 42: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3661 comments I love that scene!


message 43: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments The "Lilywhite Seventh", the Queen's Own Hussars, were named for the white facings on their dress uniforms. They saw a great deal of dangerous service in the Napoleonic Wars and it's not surprising that Lady St Erth expected the future Earl to be killed in action!




message 44: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Hana wrote: "My reaction, exactly! There was so much humor that I was completely disarmed [spoilers removed]

My favorite early scene was in Chapter 3 when the epergne was unveiled in it's new setting and Miss ..."


Miss Morville is awe-inspiring; Gervase must have felt that his nanny had just patted his head!


message 45: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments I've had to give Wikipedia quite a workout this reading. The Dowager comments that although Miss Morville comes of impeccable bloodlines her father was "actually acquainted with Horne Tooke!" Tooke was a supporter of the Americans during the Revolution and raised money for the families of those "murdered by the king's troops at Lexington and Concord" (his own words)--for which crime he was tried and convicted of treason on July 4th 1777.


message 46: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Hana wrote: "I've had to give Wikipedia quite a workout this reading. The Dowager comments that although Miss Morville comes of impeccable bloodlines her father was "actually acquainted with Horne Tooke!" Tooke..."

I missed that one - probably because it sounded like a fictitious name!


message 47: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1430 comments The Morvilles are real radicals! I'm impressed that a hidebound Tory like Heyer would write them so sympathetically. I guess the radicalism of a previous era always feels more benign than the radicalism of one's own.


message 48: by Hana (new)

Hana | 652 comments Although, as Miss Morville puts it neither of her parents "is an advocate of the more violent forms of Jacobinism"! And, fortunately, despite her mother's advanced views on "Female Education", Miss Morville proved not to be the least bit bookish :)


message 49: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments And, for all their radical beliefs, they're quite ready to let their own children be what they are - the sign of really good parents.


message 50: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1430 comments Yes, they're clearly in love with the ideas but not people of action--true of so many intellectuals of the day. The fears that Britain would be swept up in a revolutionary fervor like that of France were always pretty illusory, despite the have rings of Pitt's faction.


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