50 books to read before you die discussion

The Woman in White
This topic is about The Woman in White
38 views

Comments Showing 1-17 of 17 (17 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Christine (last edited Aug 31, 2018 02:10PM) (new) - added it

Christine This months group read from the 'open nominations' poll.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments Just started the audiobook and it is very entertaining so far!


Kayleigh | 83 comments ooo I'm doing the audiobook as well, very good and intriguing up to now, I really had no idea what this book was going to be about before starting it. I read the Moonstone a few years ago and really enjoyed that so have always planned to read another Wilkie Collins and at last I'm getting around to it.


Buck (spectru) The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins was published in the mid-nineteenth century and is written in the formal British prose of the time, a style of which I am not particularly enamored. When I read it a few years ago I had recently read two other famous Victorian novels written just slightly earlier: the Brontes' Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. Even though they are more famous, I think Collins' tome is better. And, as in those two, much is based on the etiquette having to do with one's station in life. It is most dire should an aristocrat have feelings of love for one of common standing, and vice versa. The Woman in White is a long story of deep intrigue. Despite its length, it keeps one spellbound from beginning to end. The novel employs the device of having numerous narrators, each telling that portion of the story in which he was involved, from his particular point of view. The plot is intricate and convoluted. The story is woven together with tangles and knots, but the thread is never lost, and the full fabric is revealed in the end


Indeneri | 14 comments Last read this when I was in high school. Looking forward to reading it again.


message 6: by Christine (new) - added it

Christine This year he BBC produced a new series of this. It was quite good but I think it might have been a bit confusing if you hadn't read the book.


Indeneri | 14 comments Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring sister instead?

And what's wrong with Madam Fosco? Any one have any idea what the count has done to her? Is she drugged or just putting on an act?


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments Indeneri wrote: "Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring sister instead?

And what's wrong with Madam Fosco? Any one have an..."

I dunno, I'm still reading, but I agree that the pretty sister is BOOOORRRRING.
I like the suspense, but am growing tired of the swooning, delicate English ladies, and it gets just TOO verbose .... I wish he would just get to the point. Good story, too much fluff.
I do love the white mice, though.


Buck (spectru) Nancy wrote: "...but am growing tired of the swooning, delicate English ladies, and it gets just TOO verbose .... I wish he would just get to the point. Good story, too much fluff. "

Typical of Victorian literature.


Indeneri | 14 comments Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring sister instead?

And what's wrong with Madam Fosco..."


I agree with Nancy. It is too verbose. Especially the first part, by Walter Hartwrite. It's almost like Collins couldn't work out where he wanted the story to go, so had Walter warble on to buy some time.


Indeneri | 14 comments 3rd epoch, part II.

But really how hard is it (view spoiler) to identify Laura. Just ask her something no one else would know.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments Indeneri wrote: "Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring sister instead?

And what's wrong wi..."


blah, blah, blah ... lol ... I do like the story, just sick to death of swoony, fearful women who can't even manage to dress themselves or pour themselves a cup of tea ... and wait til you get to the part ... well, never mind, but later on Walter Hartwrite comes back and boo hoo hoo .... I shouldn't make fun, I know it's a classic, but come on and stuff HAPPEN already ....
I do love the canaries and white mice ....


Indeneri | 14 comments Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring sister instead?

An..."


So I've managed to finish this, and I really wasn't sure I'd be able to.

The main problem is the pace of the different narratives. Some moved along nicely, like Marian's part, and others like both of Walter Hartrites sections were very slow.

The story really only picks up when they move to Blackwater Hall. Before that its just filler.

@Nancy, I see what you mean.

Anne Cathrick and Laura Fairlie:
(view spoiler)

All in all, an interesting story about identity theft, but too long and with too many coincidences going on, where all the characters are related to each other by either marriage or birth, and they all cross paths by deus ex machina convenience.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments Indeneri wrote: "Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Nancy wrote: "Indeneri wrote: "Can't decide if the character of Marian is 'uglified' to make a point or to give Walter Hartwrite a reason to fall for her boring siste..."
I read the spoiler even though I'm not finished with the book (hope to be before Christmas ... geez...I never was a fan for condensed books but this one is an excellent argument in favor of....) I gather my suspicions are correct. Yep, good story, just too darn many words and all this fragility and world revolving around Laura stuff, good lord, get a life girl. And Walter is a real nice guy but I would sure hate to be stuck beside him at a dinner party.


Indeneri | 14 comments Glad I was able to save you some time.

True about Walter, he and Laura both sound really dull.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments ugh ... I am still listening to the audiobook .... it helps me fall asleep. And I do want to see how it winds up. But ugh these people are just so dull. I am intrigued with the fat count's fondness for animals. I find Mrs. Catterack somewhat intriguing.


Nancy Mills (nancyfaym) | 73 comments Done. Finally. This could have been a good novel with 2/3 of it cut out. Ends pretty much as I expected.


back to top