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The Eagle of the Ninth
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Archive YA/Children Group Read > 2018 September: Author Rosemary Sutcliff

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message 1: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (last edited Aug 31, 2018 11:18AM) (new)

Lesle | 6281 comments Mod
Suggested read:
The Eagle of the Ninth is a historical adventure novel for children written by Rosemary Sutcliff and published in 1954. The story is set in Roman Britain in the 2nd century AD, after the building of Hadrian's Wall. 294 pages


Rachana | 41 comments My paperback edition has arrived well on time. I am going to start reading the same from 4th of the September. Busy weekend this one going to be as it's Janamashtami festival (Lord Sri Krishna's birthday) we are preparing to celebrate on the 2nd and 3rd of the September.

So happy Janamashtami and happy reading to all !!


message 3: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
Thank you, Rachana. I plan on starting the book next week. Glad you are joining in on this one.


message 4: by Trisha (new)

Trisha | 994 comments Rachana wrote: "My paperback edition has arrived well on time. I am going to start reading the same from 4th of the September. Busy weekend this one going to be as it's Janamashtami festival (Lord Sri Krishna's bi..."

Enjoy your celebrations, Rachana.


Rachana | 41 comments Thank you Trisha 🤗


message 6: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 729 comments For those interested this book is loosely based on the actual historical event, the Roman Ninth Legion's disappearance on the border between England and Scotland. This loss lead to the building of Hadrian's wall across the border.

Ninth Legion:

https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-127...

Hadrian's Wall:

http://hadrianswallcountry.co.uk/


Rachana | 41 comments Thank you Tracey for sharing the links.
I was reading a comment about the book which said that, "Any book which gets a person to examine the information they're being fed, is a good book." So true.


message 8: by Cleo (new) - added it

Cleo (cleopatra18) | 44 comments This book has also been made into a movie called:

The Eagle (with Channing Tatum)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1034389/...

It was quite good.

I've read this one before but I'll be interested in following the discussion!


message 9: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 6281 comments Mod
Glad to have your thoughts too Cleo, once the discussion starts flowing!


message 10: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
I have read two chapters and the author has succeeded in showing us the setting, a Roman camp in southwest Britain, the back history of the main character, Marcus, the new leader of the camp and a hint of suspenseful things to come.
What a great beginning for a book!


Rachana | 41 comments I finished reading the book and it is a very interesting, very engaging kind of read. Suspenseful of what will be the next turn of the events. The English countryside of the North Britain has been vividly described. The relationship between the main character of Markus Flavius Aquila, a Roman centurian (soldier) and his slave companion Esca Mac Cunoval, a British native from the tribe of the Brigantes is the highlight of the story. They are both young and brave and devoted towards restoring the honours of.. Markus to his father who never returned from the battlefront and Esca to his master with whom he has learned how to carry the scars of the past lightly. Five stars to the read.


message 12: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
I am glad you enjoyed it, Rachana. I will pay attention to the two characters you mentioned.


message 13: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
Here is a quote from the back of the Oxford University Press edition of the book:


The Eagle of the Ninth is heralded as one of the most outstanding children's books of the twentieth century and has sold over a million copies worldwide. It is the first of a sequence of stories about Roman Britain by one of the most highly respected writers of children's literature, Rosemary Sutcliff.

I agree with that entirely. It is a wonderful book.


message 14: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
Here is some information about the author. The source is the book I am reading.

Rosemary Sutcliff was born in Surrey. At the age of two she contracted the progressively wasting Still's disease and spent most of her life in a wheelchair.
During her early years she had to lie on her back and was read to by her mother: authors such as Dickens, Thackeray and Trollope, as well as Greek and Roman legends.
At the age of 14 she attended art school, specializing in miniature painting. In the 1940s she exhibited her first painting and became a member of the Royal Society of Miniature Painters.
Her first children's book, The Queen's Story, was published in 1950.
She received an OBE in 1975 and a CBE in 1992.
She died at the age of 72 in 1992.


Rachana | 41 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Here is some information about the author. The source is the book I am reading.

Rosemary Sutcliff was born in Surrey. At the age of two she contracted the progressively wasting Still's disease and..."


Thank you Rosemarie for writing about the book and its author. The 2018 September month's YA / Children's Classic choice of the book has been outstanding, one of the best read this year in the genre. I am not surprised when I read about the author of the book been a specialised painter. The way she has described the English countryside, the topography of the land, vibrant colours of the sky and the mist, it is all really fascinating just like colours coming out of a painting and giving life to the narrative.
I think this is the book which I am going to read again and again. It is compact and has a certain warm-hearted feeling to it.


message 16: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Sep 16, 2018 06:08AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
I have read a number of her books, but this is still my favourite, but they are all good.
She wrote a book about Boudicca, who is mentioned early on in the book, called Song for a Dark Queen, which gives the point of view of the British instead of the Romans. It is enjoyable too.

I am so glad you enjoyed it too. 😄


message 17: by Manybooks (new) - added it

Manybooks | 520 comments My favourite by Rosemary Sutcliff is Warrior Scarlet. And just like Guelph author Jean Little (who has been virtually blind since birth), Sutcliff, because of her own physical challenges, always writes with such feeling and understanding about the latter, and often also features characters who face physical and/or other challenges in her novels.


message 18: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
I haven't read that one yet, Manybooks. I will see if I can get a copy from the library sometime in the future.
I love the Jean Little books, especially From Anna. I can relate to being a new little German girl in Canada. For me, that was 60 years ago!


message 19: by Manybooks (new) - added it

Manybooks | 520 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I haven't read that one yet, Manybooks. I will see if I can get a copy from the library sometime in the future.
I love the Jean Little books, especially From Anna. I can relate to being a new littl..."


Did you also read the sequel Listen for the Singing? This has a more decidedly WWII element in it and how Anna is both bullied due to her German background (and more than because of her vision issues in the first novel) and how she also makes many friends who help her cope.


message 20: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - rated it 5 stars

Rosemarie | 8920 comments Mod
Yes, I did. Manybooks. I am a big fan of Jean Little's earlier books.


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