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2018 Monthly Challenge > September Group Read Discussion: Hamilton: The Revolution

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message 1: by Nadine in NY (new)

Nadine in NY Jones | 6904 comments Mod
Discussion is open for Hamilton: The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda for September's group read of "a book that is also a play." This month's discussion leader volunteer is Theresa.

Please use spoiler tags if you are sharing any plot related surprises.

Posts should be exclusively about this book.

When you've finished, be sure to post in the "September Challenge: I finished!" thread.


message 2: by Theresa (last edited Aug 30, 2018 08:58AM) (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Hello everyone! Welcome to our September discussion of Hamilton: The Revolution. For the next month, this will be 'The Room Where It Happens'!

Sorry, could not resist.....😊. We should have some fun this month!

Format for the month: Every week I will post a couple of questions to keep discussion going, but feel free to add your own. Spoiler tags are advised when appropriate, but seriously, does anyone here not know the story?! Which leads into the first questions:

1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not?

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why?

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order?

4. What format are you reading it?

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it?

I will post my answers later as work is calling.


message 3: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments I will probably only pop in and out of this discussion, but I can't resist as my household is Hamilton obsessed!

1. Since this prompt was one of my suggestions for 2018 I have to say that a book like this wasn't what I had in mind, BUT you could argue that it is heavily about the story and making of the musical so I think it works.

2. I don't recall what I voted for. I know it wasn't this. I think it was The Phantom of the Opera.

3. I have the soundtrack pretty much memorized. I was able to snag a video recording of the musical on YouTube once so even though I haven't had the privilege (or, let's face it, the $) to see it on stage in person I do have an idea of how it was done. I watched the PBS documentary (I think that's what it was) from a year or two ago. Alexander Hamilton is on my list to read. I've owned a copy for a couple years but I just haven't managed to sit down and read it yet.

4. I have the audio version, but I really want to borrow my niece's hardback copy to flip through. I wish Lin-Manuel Miranda did the full audio narration.

5. No, but I listen to bits and pieces of the soundtrack every once in a while (usually in the car).


message 4: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments I am back to answer my inaugural questions, but first want to add that I'll be breaking down discussion during September as follows:

Week #1 - very general questions
Week #2 - Through Chapter 16 (Act I and essays)
Week #3 - Chapter 17 to end (Act II and rest of essays)
Week #4 - general discussion of book

1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not?

I agree with Sara, this is not what the prompt anticipates you reading, and I did not vote for it either. The script of the play itself or the book of the musical itself is not a book that is also a stage play. It should be the book that inspired the stage play or musical to be created. In fact, the original biography that inspired Lin-Manuel Miranda to create Hamilton would fit the prompt - Alexander Hamilton. Don't remember what my initial suggestion was or ultimately what I voted for - probably something like Grand Hotel or Phantom of the Opera.

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why?

Don't remember what my initial suggestion was or ultimately what I voted for - probably something like Grand Hotel, Tales of the South Pacificor The Phantom of the Opera. I wanted to pick a book that wasn't the most obvious choice, create some diversity, be something that others might not immediately realize inspired the creation of a well-known play or musical.

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order?

In short, yes! I live in NYC and have connections to the theater scene, so I made sure to see Hamilton during Broadway previews, and was absolutely gobsmacked (and I knew it was going to be amazing because I'd seen Miranda's other work and had heard a great deal about it from folks in the theater biz who were involved or saw it during it's limited Off-Broadway run. Even the head of the security guys for that Off-Broadway theater was raving about it and he's not into theater at all - in spite of his job!). Stumbled out of the theater stunned by what I had just seen and knowing I would see it again -- and I've actually seen it twice now, original cast plus replacement cast. It is just as stunning each time. I became obsessed, bought the cast album as soon as it was available and listened to it endlessly, still have the PBS special saved on my DVR and watch it occasionally, and saw a 60 Minutes special as well - here's a link: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minut.... Read this book in anticipation of seeing it the 2nd time - and it really informed my experience! I have yet to read the Chernow biography, but it's on my kindle so some day....

I am still obsessed! Sara, your household is not alone in its Hamilton obsession, LOL!

4. What format are you reading it?

I had the hardcover print edition, but when I was ready to read it, could not find it in the piles of books around my apartment. So I bought the Kindle edition and started reading it on Kindle. Fortunatelysoon after starting it I found my hardcover (which now resides in a place of honor as Lin-Manuel autographed it for me) and read most of it from that. I did listen to a sample of the audio but the tactile experience of the print book was so intrinsic to the reading experience, I cannot imagine it satifying. The format of the print book (which is reproduced in the ebook) is a key part of the reading experience, IMHO, rendering it unique.

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it? I kept finding myself looking up and listening to the actual songs on the soundtrack each time I came to its mention in the book. Really enriched the reading experience for me.

As you can see, I'm a really big fan of Hamilton and Lin-Manuel Miranda! But do not let that influence whether you post or not. You don't have to agree, and in fact, I'd love to hear from those who were underwhelmed. All are welcome here!


message 5: by Teri (last edited Aug 30, 2018 02:21PM) (new)

Teri (teria) | 1316 comments I listened to this earlier in the year for the two authors prompt and read Matilda (I'm seeing the musical next week) for this prompt. But since I'm finished with the challenge and my time is now my own, I'm going to get a written copy from the library and participate anyway. Because who can resist a chance to talk about Hamilton?

1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not?
Probably not. But just seeing the name on the list probably got many people to vote for it without really knowing the format of the book. I agree that the book that actually inspired the musical would have been a better choice.

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why?
I did not vote for it. I don't remember what I voted for, however.

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order?
I have a friend who is obsessed with Lin-Manuel Miranda because of "In the Heights," and she started talking about this musical before I heard about it anywhere else. I started reading the Chernow book Alexander Hamilton, but it is a bear to read (fascinating but looong) and I didn't make it far before it was due at the library. [I just put it on Hold again since I had vowed I was going to finish it this year]. I bought the soundtrack, watched any YouTube videos I could find, watched the PBS special, and follow Lin-Manual on Twitter because he's brilliant and amazing. The musical came to town earlier this year and sold out immediately at prices I could not afford. I put in for the $10 lottery every single day, but no such luck. Someday . . .

4. What format are you reading it?
Having listened to the audiobook previously, I can say without any hesitation: DO NOT LISTEN TO THE AUDIOBOOK (unless you use it with the written one). There is so much you miss, and it was frustrating. I'm looking forward to going through this again with the written version.

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it?
I would listen to the part about a song, and then listen to the song. I will do it again that way. There is so much information given about the song that it is vital to listen to them as well.

I adore everything surrounding this musical, and I am looking forward to discussing it. The vast majority of my friends have not caught the vision and don't quite get the obsession.

Side Note: It is going to be difficult for me to not discuss plays and musicals in the "I Finished" thread, I can tell. Next to books, theater is my favorite thing. I wonder if there is a place like Goodreads for theater.


message 6: by Sara (new)

Sara | 1508 comments Well I guess that settles it. I need to get my hands on a print copy! Audio isn't the best format for me anyway. I just picked it up on an audible sale last year. Print is my favorite format!


message 7: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Teri wrote: "Side Note: It is going to be difficult for me to not discuss plays and musicals in the "I Finished" thread, I can tell. Next to books, theater is my favorite thing. I wonder if there is a place like Goodreads for theater."

We must be soulmates (and not just because to family I'm also a "Teri") ! I go to all types of art and music performances, but theater is my passion, the one that is always in my life. In fact yesterday I just bought a few more tickets for the fall season Off-Broadway (Days of Rage, the new show by the playwright who wrote the book for Dear Evan Hanson). When I have time, I'm going to search to see if there is a Good Reads group as you suggest - there has to be!

How about if say in the last week of the month, we open up to discuss any books read in the "I Finished' posts that are basis for play or musical? Maybe a week earlier if discussion is lagging?


message 8: by Teri (new)

Teri (teria) | 1316 comments Sounds like a great idea.


message 9: by Teri (new)

Teri (teria) | 1316 comments People ask me all the time if my name is Theresa.


message 10: by Rachelnyc (new)

Rachelnyc | 186 comments 1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not? Yes I do although I agree I understand that it was not the original intent.

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why? I nominated this book so yes, I also voted for it!

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order? I saw the show shortly after it debuted on Broadway and, like so many others, became obsessed with it! I've been a LMM fan since In the Heights but this show is next level brilliant! Next I listened to the soundtrack, which I still listen to regularly and then saw the PBS show about it. I will get to the Chernow book eventually and I also fell down a rabbit hole reading several historical fiction novels surrounding the Revolution and aftermath.

4. What format are you reading it? I originally started listening to the audiobook because I knew LMM narrated the footnotes but I was not a fan of Mariska Hargitay's narration so I switched to the regular book.

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it? Of course!


message 11: by Teri (new)

Teri (teria) | 1316 comments I picked this up from the library today, as well as Chernow's book. Both are really heavy books!


message 12: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Teri wrote: "I picked this up from the library today, as well as Chernow's book. Both are really heavy books!"

This one is the faster easier read though!


message 13: by Taylor (new)

Taylor | 178 comments 1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not?
I do think this fits the prompt nicely since it is about the writing and creation of Hamilton. I can see how some people may not agree as it is not a direct adaptation.

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why?
I did not, but I am glad it was chosen.

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order?'
I have heard snippets of songs but had not explored the show much prior to reading this book. I want to save the magic for whenever I get to see the show on stage.

4. What format are you reading it?
I listened to the audiobook and I'm so glad I did!

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it?
No


message 14: by Theresa (last edited Sep 13, 2018 10:53PM) (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Hello All! Sorry for the delay in posting the next round of discussion questions. I am on vacation with limited connectivity.

Not sure how much we need to use spoilers - I leave that as an individual choice, unless someone has strong opinion one way or another?

This week we will discuss Act I and the accompanying essays (takes us through Chapter 16).

1. From the show itself:
A. What information about Hamilton, Burr, and/or the other historical figures was most surprising to you?
B. What song lyrics most connected with you?
C. Which of Lin-Manuel's extensive annotations most surprised you, interested you, informed you?

2. From the essays:
A. What surprised you most about show's evolution, from initial idea to musical workshops.
B. The casting essays...which stood out to you?
C. What were the highlights for you of the staging decisions - set, costumes, props, choreography.

3. (view spoiler)

I will post my answers as soon as I have a chance. Feel free to add discussion points!


message 15: by Theresa (last edited Sep 26, 2018 10:49PM) (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Here are my comments on the discussion points:
A. What information about Hamilton, Burr, and/or the other historical figures was most surprising to you?

There were quite a few things, including Hamilton's background (not a Founding Father whose story I knew). But the biggest revelation for me was the rivalry between Hamilton and Burr. Or let's say what Burr saw as a rivalry. I don't think, as portrayed here, that Hamilton considered Burr a rival.
B. What song lyrics most connected with you?
In Act I, 'My Shot' because of the sharp beat emphasis on those 2 words throughout as much as the concept behind the lyric...another way of putting your all behind something, taking a risk, pushing.
C. Which of Lin-Manuel's extensive annotations most surprised you, interested you, informed you?
So much, but in Act I, perhaps this one where he rhymes in Footnote 9 in Chapter 2, My Shot, "“You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught” from South Pacific, a Rodgers and Hammerstein classic about racism. As Laurens and the boys rap about equality, Burr comes in with some cold reality." The pure genius of connecting a musical classic like South Pacific with a rap number...gave me chills.
2. From the essays:
A. What surprised you most about show's evolution, from initial idea to musical workshops.
not the fact it took so long to go from idea to stage, but the fact he initially and for a long time conceived of it as a mixtape only. That just astounds me given the utter perfection of it as a musical. Not that I am too opinionated or anything!

B. The casting essays...which stood out to you?

No contest, but the one for Angelica with Renee Elise Goldberry. Lin's comment about her delivery being the first audition where he wasn't thinking about the delivery, that "her velocity expresses her brilliance, and her distress..." resonated I saw her performance in the show, and that was exactly it: you listened to the intellect, the emotion and story, and just let the rapidity of the delivery support it. It was a tour de force performance that was not given as such.

C. What were the highlights for you of the staging decisions - set, costumes, props, choreography.

There is a photo on page 140-141 where the dancers are holding a board at a slant for Hamilton to use as a writing table...which is part of a whirlwind of a choreographed sequence for 'Non-stop'. When I saw the show, that whole sequence was fabulous, but that moment simply made me gasp..so fluid and unexpected. Reading about Andy Blankenbuehler's intentions in this sequence, as told in Chapter 16, blew my mind.

3. (view spoiler)


message 16: by Teri (new)

Teri (teria) | 1316 comments I've been meaning to figure out my responses to this, but I've not been in a reading mood this week. Hopefully over the weekend . . .


message 17: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Past time for next round of questions...this time dealing with Act II and the essays attached (starts with chapter 17).

1. Act II opens with the arrival of Thomas Jefferson, newly returned from France. Thoughts on how Hamilton the Show introduces and portrays Jefferson as compared to the image you already had.

2. Hamilton, the affair, his marriage, and Angelica - were you shocked? Do you believe Hamilton was ever unfaithful with Angelica...is that hinted at or not? How would it all play out if happening in 2018?

3. How pivotal is "The Room Where it Happens" in the Burr/Hamilton relationship?

4. The infamous duel...after reading the cript and accompanying essays, your thoughts on why Hamilton agreed to the duel and how Lin-Manuel et al. Elected to stage it.


message 18: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments My answers to latest round of questions:

1. Act II opens with the arrival of Thomas Jefferson, newly returned from France. Thoughts on how Hamilton the Show introduces and portrays Jefferson as compared to the image you already had.

Totally taken aback by the portrayal of Jefferson - funnier, more arrogant and ambitious. In so many ways, the portrayal of Jefferson shook up a lot of preconceptions I had, certainly giving him more negative traits. My image of Jefferson as a statesman is a bit tarnished. And his entrance singing 'What'd I miss', dzncing down a staircase like something from the Ziegfeld Follies, summing up the entire American Revolution in 4 words, priceless.

2. Hamilton, the affair, his marriage, and Angelica - were you shocked? Do you believe Hamilton was ever unfaithful with Angelica...is that hinted at or not? How would it all play out if happening in 2018?

I think it shows nothing has changed all that much. Men in power cheat, wives forgive them, repeat. As fo Angelica...flirtation yes, affair no but believe it is deliberately hinted as a possibility. In reality, they were not living on the same continent through much of their friendship. Definitely an affair of the mind as in 2 brilliant intellects playing off each other. How would it play out today? Good question...probably much the same except for one thing...Hamilton would never publicly acknowledge it today as he did then.

3. How pivotal is "The Room Where it Happens" in the Burr/Hamilton relationship?

I think this is the moment where Burr's jealousy becomes all-consuming, and a clash becomes inevitable. This is one of my favorite songs too...as a woman, I can definitely relate to being shut out of critical decision-making sessions.

4. The infamous duel...after reading the script and accompanying essays, your thoughts on why Hamilton agreed to the duel and how Lin-Manuel et al. elected to stage it.

In some ways, Hamilton seems to see the duel with Burr as inevitable, as something he must endure almost as a penance, not as something out of anger or to prove anything. It is like his brilliant flame is flickering out and he no longer has the energy or drive he was famous for. The staging of the duel is absolutely brilliant, reminding me of a ticking stopwatch.


message 19: by Cendaquenta (last edited Sep 26, 2018 09:18PM) (new)

Cendaquenta | 694 comments Right, I've finally started this and read up to the end of Act 1, let's answer those questions...

1. Do you think the choice of Hamilton: The Revolution actually fits the prompt requirements which are 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical', and if so why? If not, why not?
Not reeeaaaally... I read the prompt as a book that's been adapted into a play, whereas this is essentially the making-of, in book form, of a play that already exists.

2. Did you vote for Hamilton: The Revolution during September group read selection, and if so why?
Honestly, I had to go check - I thought I'd voted for this, but turns out I voted for Wicked instead. Both cases would have the same reasoning - I already own them and want to read them anyway.

3. Previous to reading Hamilton: The Revolution have you had any other exposure to the musical itself [i.e. seen show or documentary or interview about making, read [book:Alexander Hamilton|16130], listen to soundtrack), and in what order?
All of those. Listened to the soundtrack, shortly after booked tickets to the play in London, and essentially swotted up as much as I could before I got there. Finished the Chernow book during packing for the trip. It was a behemoth.

4. What format are you reading it?
Physical, hardback. I, in fact, bought this copy the day after I saw the show. Would've bought it at the theatre itself but they'd sold out.

5. Are you listening to the soundtrack while reading it?
Yep! Got the CD in the laptop's disc drive and am listening to the songs as the book discusses them.

--

Act 1 questions:

1. From the show itself:
A. What information about Hamilton, Burr, and/or the other historical figures was most surprising to you?
B. What song lyrics most connected with you?
C. Which of Lin-Manuel's extensive annotations most surprised you, interested you, informed you?


A. Listening to it now, not that much, since obviously I've already read Chernow and done research about the real people and such. When I was listening to it the first time... honestly at that point I knew nothing about American history, so not much surprised me then either as I had no preconceptions to shatter. I just listened to the story as if it were about fictional characters. I did find it interesting that Hamilton was such a ladies' man and Burr had an affair with a married woman, since the stereotype is that the people of that time period were so very straitlaced.

B. Anything Eliza sings, I just... love it. I don't know why, it's not like we have much in common or I've ever been in anything like the situations she has.

C. I find the parts where Lin talks about his musical inspirations really interesting, particularly all the rappers he loves, even though I know nothing about rap.
The parts where he talks about his personal life when he was writing the songs are adorable. Loved the backstory to "Dear Theodosia" - because puppies.

2. From the essays:
A. What surprised you most about show's evolution, from initial idea to musical workshops.
B. The casting essays...which stood out to you?
C. What were the highlights for you of the staging decisions - set, costumes, props, choreography.


A. I guess that at the time of the White House rap, the show wasn't really a thing yet. I thought, at first, that they performed at the WH because the show was such a runaway success. That that was pretty much its genesis... wow.

B. The one about Washington. I just thought it was so lovely that Lin particularly wanted Chris Jackson for Washington because he thought his and Jackson's relationship was similar to Ham and Wash's.

C. I liked the essay about the choreography, how there are so many little details even in the way the characters move - Burr goes in straight lines, Hamilton goes in arcs. The one about the props was great too - I never knew there was such an insane level of detail on things that the audience can't even make out.

3. Act I ends with Washington picking Hamilton to head Treasury, and Hamilton seizing and using various themes [lyrical and musical] that were heard earlier, but from other characters. What was your reaction/feeling at this moment? The essays end here with Lin-Manuel saying "But as Alexander Hamilton kept trying to tell us, even the best-ordered societies need infusions of new blood to thrive. Keep it in mind the next time you go to the theater: Some gifted men and women have built a community in that room, and the immigrant is you." Is this a fair analysis or contrived?

I don't know how to respond to this, and I'm tired - it's the wee hours of the morning in my timezone. It's something I'll need to come back to.

I did like Lin's quote about community. I was just thinking about that recently, how it's hard (for me at least) to really grasp the amount of work and time and people that goes in to creating a play or a TV show or any kind of performance really. Every time I go to the theatre I feel stunned and, I don't know what's the word - honoured? humbled? that so many amazing individuals will give and do so much just to entertain a room of strangers.


message 20: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Love your responses Cendaquenta, and have to give you serious props for reading Chernow...it loiters on my Kindle still!

I was much taken with your final comment about the amount of work ...I have worked in theater (in my misspent youth), have many clients and friends active in theater, and I was still awed by what went into Hamilton. And by how it completely holds up on repeated viewing.


message 21: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments Final discussion questions for Hamilton: The Revolution:

1. After reading this book and his extensive annotations, did your perception of Lin-Manuel Miranda change in any way?

2. Have your perceptions changed about rap music? Of what makes a great even revolutionary, trend setting, musical? Of the characters and events portrayed?

3. If you switched formats during reading (i.e. from audio to print), did it improve/change/hamper the experience?

4. If you have not seen the show, has it increased or decreased your desire to see it? If you saw the show before reading, did it illuminate anything about the show for you?

5. Back to my first question from week one: Did this book actually fit the prompt?


message 22: by Theresa (last edited Sep 28, 2018 03:15PM) (new)

Theresa | 1872 comments 1. After reading this book and his extensive annotations, did your perception of Lin-Manuel Miranda change in any way?

Actually it did. I have the great good fortune to know Lin-Manuel and his family personally. But even knowing him and his extended family prior to Hamilton, I came away from reading this with a hugely expanded sense of just what a creative force he is, and how music just constantly flows through him. He and his family are some of the nicest, kindest, and most down to earth people in the world, and that comes through as well.

2. Have your perceptions changed about rap music? Of what makes a great even revolutionary, trend setting, musical? Of the characters and events portrayed?

While not in any way a rap music fan or even particularly knowledgeable about rap music, I did have some sense before Hamilton of its versatility and ability to go main stream. Don't laugh but years ago gold medalist figure skater Victor Petrenko did an amazing routine to rap. It was past time for it to be incorporated into such a main stream musical.

As a long time student of theater and musicals, I knew that the biggest change comes from those who 'break the rules' as with West Side Story, A Chorus Line, and Oklahoma.

As for perceptions of the historic figures -- well when I visited for the first time the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC and toured the Presidential Portraits, it took me a moment to adjust to our founding fathers all be white, all because of the Hamilton impact!

3. If you switched formats during reading (i.e. from audio to print), did it improve/change/hamper the experience?

I stuck to the print format. Which was exceptional experience.

4. If you have not seen the show, has it increased or decreased your desire to see it? If you saw the show before reading, did it illuminate anything about the show for you?

I read this after having seen the show the year before, but just before my second time, and it really added to the experience. Of course, the first time was during the Broadway previews so no one knew what to expect and you literally sat there stunned, even shaken, wondering what wonder had just happened and knowing Broadway musicals had just taken a giant leap into the unknown. It was exhilarating! But I was really happy to have had the chance to read a book about its creation before seeing it the second and third time as it helped pick up some of the nuances, especially of the staging and choreography.

5. Back to my first question from week one: Did this book actually fit the prompt?

Absolutely not. The prompt was 'a book that is also a stage play or a musical' - meaning an adaptation of a book because the script for a musical is called 'the book' and a stage play script is called 'a play'. Basically there is nothing really to discuss - in spite of the questions I posed to stimulate discussion -- when its a book about the staging of a musical. There's nothing to compare or contrast, no cut or added scenes or characters to debate, no tampered with plot points.

Doesn't mean this isn't a fabulous book to read and it is fun to talk about it, but it's not what the prompt required and certainly isn't one that stimulated any discussion for a month -- as all can see.

I think we need to be more careful what we vote on in the future to be sure there really can be a discussion.


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