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The Miscellaneous Club > September 2018: Libraries, Bookstores, Books, Reading

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message 1: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
September 6 is Read a Book Day and September 8 is International Literacy Day. So, in September, we will read books about libraries, bookstores, books, and reading. Fiction, non-fiction, picture books, chapter books, graphic novels, etc.


message 2: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Aug 29, 2018 04:30PM) (new)


message 3: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Aug 29, 2018 04:31PM) (new)


message 5: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
I know that all the books I posted are about libraries, but you are also welcome to read about bookstores, books in general, and reading/literacy in general.


message 7: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)


message 8: by Manybooks (last edited Aug 30, 2018 06:46PM) (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Of course, my absolute favourite book-based children's novel and one of my favourite books of all time, period is Michael Ende's Die unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story).

And I read the book in 1979 when it was first published (I got a copy sent to me for Christmas), and when the movie came out, I was so annoyed at the changes and that they basically stopped half way through, that I walked out.


message 9: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments Manybooks -Have you read the Ink World trilogy? I'm curious about the book quotes and if the translation is as excellent as it sounds. I loved the books and the world Cornelia Funke created. I know some younger readers have read the books especially because Hollywood made a lame movie (I haven't seen it) out of the first book. I would not recommend them to sensitive younger readers unless they've already devoured the Harry Potter series.

Tomorrow if I'm not hot, tired and hungry after work I'll hit up the library again. I have Saturday off so I don't have to rush home woohoo!


message 10: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks -Have you read the Ink World trilogy? I'm curious about the book quotes and if the translation is as excellent as it sounds. I loved the books and the world Cornelia Funke created. I know..."

I want to read the trilogy, but I do not want to read it in English translation but in the German originals (or rather I want to read the German originals before I read the trilogy in translation), so I will be waiting until I can get copies (and I have also heard that the books do become pretty gruesome).


message 11: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments Manybooks wrote: "
I want to read the trilogy, but I do not want to read it in English translation but in the German originals (or rather I want to read the German originals before I read the trilogy in translation), so I will be waiting until I can get copies (and I have also heard that the books do become pretty gruesome). "


I'm interested in your opinion. The English translation sounds wonderful to a native English speaker. All the book quotes in the epigraphs are mostly from English language books and I wondered whether that was a translator decision or author decision. Either way, the Inkworld is captivating. Meggie, Mo and Dustfinger linger in my memory long after I've forgotten the details of the story.

The series is wonderful but it is a medieval type world with some dangerous villains. It's not any worse than Harry Potter-more romance though.


message 12: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "
I want to read the trilogy, but I do not want to read it in English translation but in the German originals (or rather I want to read the German originals before I read the trilo..."


Do you lnow the nane of the translator, for if it is Anthea Bell, the translations are likely very good.


message 13: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments Manybooks wrote: "Do you lnow the nane of the translator, for if it is Anthea Bell, the translations are likely very good. "

Yes, Anthea Bell translated the Inkworld and the Ruby Red trilogies.


message 14: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "Do you lnow the nane of the translator, for if it is Anthea Bell, the translations are likely very good. "

Yes, Anthea Bell translated the Inkworld and the Ruby Red trilogies."


Oh good, then I might consider reading the trilogy in English even if I do not yet have it in German.


message 15: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Marguerite Makes a Book

Now in many ways Bruce Robertson's Marguerite Makes a Book does a truly wonderful job with both meticulous detail and engagement showing and demonstrating how a hand-painted (illuminated) Mediaeval book is (or more to the point how such a tome generally was) was created, was made (and indeed also why these types of manuscripts were generally majorly expensive, and thus only affordable to and for the nobility or rarely, very rich merchants, as Marguerite Makes a Book not only points out the long periods of time that had to be spent painting the often intricate scenes, the flowers, convoluted letters etc., but also the expense and again the planning needed to purchase the raw materials required to mix, to make the individual paint shades and hues, that even the initial set-up in order to even be able to commence painting, illustrating a given book took both time and often quite a bit of money).

However, while I have indeed very much enjoyed Marguerite Makes a Book (and have probably even learned a bit myself even though I thought I knew all there is to know with regard to the art of Mediaeval book illumination), personally I most definitely would have rather if not even much preferred an entirely factual account instead of reading a sweetly engaging but clearly totally fictional and imagined account and storyline. For although as a work of fiction, I do appreciate Marguerite's strength of character and that she simply decides to take matters into her own hands and finish painting the illuminations, the book illustrations for her ageing and a bit ailing father, considering that Marguerite Makes a Book does take place in the Middle Ages (in the 1400s), frankly I do have to at least wonder whether in reality, Marguerite on her own deciding to complete her father's book illustrations might not be potentially somewhat anachronistic in nature (and I also even have to question how Marguerite is simply able and allowed to go out into the streets of Mediaeval Paris on her own, as I do think that from a historical reality point of view, a young teenaged girl like Marguerite would more than likely have for one required an adult chaperone and for two probably would have been wearing a head covering whilst out and about in public).

And yes, Marguerite's lack of a head covering (which at least according to my own research was very often and actually generally a requirement for many if not most Mediaeval women and older girls) leads me to the second point of mild criticism with regard to Marguerite Makes a Book, namely that Kathryn Hewitt's accompanying illustrations, although they are indeed descriptive, colourfully, gorgeously detailed, do at least to and for me (at least with regard to the outfits, the clothing depicted) remind me more of the early Renaissance than the Middle Ages, not a huge issue of course and to be sure, but it still does frustrate and annoy me a trifle, as I certainly would much prefer period-specific clothing being shown. Three stars for Marguerite Makes a Book, and even with my own issues still highly recommended (although the potential for historical anachronisms does rather bother me and indeed, I would most likely have given Marguerite Makes a Book a four or even a five star ranking if for one the storyline had felt a bit more realistically Mediaeval and for two if Bruce Robertson had aside from the handy glossary at the back, also included suggestions for other study and reading).


message 16: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 02, 2018 02:27PM) (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
I have read quite a few picture books about libraries, and many of them, I have really enjoyed.

I found The Librarian of Basra: A True Story from Iraq wonderful and evocative, and I do find it majorly sad that there have actually been MORONS who have wanted this book banned and censored simply because it states that American troops bombed libraries in Basra (and other areas of Iraq).

I also really loved both the story and the presented message of protesting by means of non violent civil disobedience in Ron's Big Mission, as that kind of protest is both acceptable and often very much necessary (and Ron McNair not only got his library card but also became an astronaut).

The importance of librarians, and how they historically often brought the gift of literary to remote areas of the United Sates (and in some areas of the world, it is still librarians on horseback, on camels, on mules who bring books and learning to remote mountain villages etc.) is an important and never to be forgotten theme.

I have very much enjoyed Miss Dorothy and Her Bookmobile, and That Book Woman is also a both fun and historically significant depiction of how in the USA, librarians often had to travel great distances (and sometimes on foot or on horseback) in order to bring books and literacy to more remote areas.

And Waiting for the Biblioburro shows how that is still the case in more remote mountain areas of Central and South America.

While many books on libraries and librarians are lovely, there are also unfortunately some that I have found grating and annoyingly silly. And therefore, while I did for example very much like Tomas and the Library Lady (especially since it was based on a true story), I have found The Boy Who Was Raised by Librarians mostly annoying, artificial and trying to be humorous but really not succeeding.


message 17: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 02, 2018 09:52AM) (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Of course, Louisa May Alcott's classic Little Women is not specifically a novel about books and reading, but considering all the literary allusions etc. found in the novel, and that Jo obviously is both an avid reader and a budding writer (not to mention the magazine the March Family girls have created), there is much much included in Little Women that is specifically to do with books, with the joys of reading.

But while I have always loved Little Women, novels that have Little Women as a possible theme, I have not always found all that appealing.

Now with the Mother-Daughter Book Club books, while I have in fact usually liked the book club parts of the individual novels (when the girls and their mothers are discussing Little Women, Anne of Green Gables etc.), much of the non Book Club scenarios, I have tended to find a bit trivial, juvenile and sometimes rather stereotyping.

But the book based on a book that I have so far despised the most is likely Little Women and Me, which I really have truly hated and which almost felt as though the author was deliberately having her character wreak havoc in Little Women.


message 18: by QNPoohBear (last edited Sep 02, 2018 05:07PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments There are a couple of American Girl books that deal with libraries, books and reading. They're out of print now but some libraries (aunts and moms) have them.

Samantha's Special Talent Samantha holds a talent show to save the library

Addy Learns a Lesson: A School Story about a newly freed slave attending school and learning to read for the first time

Kit's Short Story Collection has a story set in Appalachia while Kit is visiting her Aunt Millie. Aunt Millie's friend finds a way to bring books to the people even after their school is closed. People can't pay and won't accept something for nothing, however, and Kit comes up with a great solution.

For the same age group Lumber Camp Library

Other good books for ages 11-13 include
Scones and Sensibility- Older readers will love the literary references to Jane Austen and Anne of Green Gables. This is sort of a young readers version of Emma.

Fly by Night and Fly Trap about banning books and the power of the written word.

The American Library Association's Banned Books Week is coming up at the end of the month so this one might be a good one to read even if it's not on the banned and challenged list.


message 19: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Sep 02, 2018 06:37PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
I just finished reading Fly By Night a couple of days ago. I am sorry to say that I was not impressed. In fact, I am one of very few people who didn't really like the story. I struggled to finish it, and set it aside a couple of times in order to read something else. I really couldn't relate to Mosca the main character, the story was overlong, and was mostly about the politics of this fictional land (Mandelion). I don't particularly like stories about politics. In addition, the book was promoted as fantasy, but there were no fantasy themes anywhere in the book--no witches, no wizards, no unicorns, fairies or dragons, in fact, no magic at all. Other people did like it, however, so I would not try to convince others not to read it.


message 20: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "I just finished reading Fly By Night a couple of days ago. I am sorry to say that I was not impressed. In fact, I am one of very few people who didn't really like the story. I struggled to finish i..."

Thanks for the warning, Beverly! There are enough problems with politics in the real world that I do not especially want to read about them in fiction at this time.


message 21: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
My children's librarian did find for me a lot of books about libraries, not surprisingly. I'll start reading them tomorrow. But for now let me suggest that a lot of "meta" fiction are books about books. For example, I picked up Whose Story Is This, Anyway? and it's terrific.

Funny, exciting, clean & vibrant cartoony art, and an ending that warmed the cockles of my heart. I'd be very surprised if youngsters who see this don't want to find more books... and thereby become more literate.

Speaking just for my adult self, though, I actually want (view spoiler)


message 22: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
A very funny book that teaches about caring for library books is Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book: Book Care Guidelines from Library Secret Service. All librarians are members of the Librarian Secret Service and want you to love your book, hug it to keep it safe, etc..., and bring it back so another child can borrow it. The don'ts are very silly, the do's are relevant & clear.

Library behavior is addressed in If You Ever Want to Bring a Circus to the Library, Don't!. This is a little more confusing, because our young heroine seems to be getting away with some pretty rowdy behavior. But it does have an actual plot, and I'm sure kids love the humor. The posters that say "You can do anything at your library" do indeed need to be re-written.


message 23: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
I don't understand the point of The Not So Quiet Library at all. Even before the monster appears we have Dad feeding the boys donuts for breakfast, then going to the 'nap section' on a different floor from the children's section. And they 'crept past old pickled-onion Mr. Tasker.' And the boys are brothers, though one is human and one is a bear (?). Goodness.

The monster has been trying to eat the books, and the staff hasn't noticed? It's stomping around and Dad doesn't wake up? It gets its "low blood sugar" addressed by story-time?

Very strange book.


message 24: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Bats at the Library is not to my taste. Wordy, with a rhyme that seems forced. Too much time spent outside the books, even outside the library, for me. Though I do like the effort to desensitize those who are squeamish about bats (like spiders & coyotes, they are valuable members of our ecosystems).

And I do like the author's bio in which it's said that Lies visits local libraries when he travels... I do too! Do you?


message 25: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments Cheryl: The first two books sound so cute! I put them on my wish list for my nephews but my city doesn't have them and there are only so many books I can carry home on the bus. Hopefully I'll see the younger, cuter boy often enough to read those books to him plus all the others I put on the wish list! He starts the new school year soon so maybe they have some at his school.


message 26: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
It's a common theme, and many school teachers and librarians have something along those lines. Those are among the better tellings, imo, esp. for kids who like silliness.


message 27: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Little Library Mouse is actually an ode to books of various genres, not to libraries. I found it rather twee and silly, but if you like rhyming text, here's a sample, the one verse I do sorta like: “I'm red/ I'm yellow/ I'm iridescent blue,/ Short stories are rainbows/ Of sharp color and hue.”

Then there's Anthony Browne's cozy I Like Books, short, simple, sweet, especially good for the tots who like a book read a bajillion times because it'll only take a dozen reads before they have it memorized (with picture clues). It would also make a good filler or introduction for a larger story-time. It also might be a good mentor text for an “I like dogs,” “I like trains,” “I like...”.

The best of the three imo is Wild About Books by Judy Sierra. The rhyming text rollicks right along, as the animals learn to love to read, to tell stories, to write, and then to build and manage a branch library of their own! I particularly liked the treasure hunt of the different titles, for example Big Bad Bruce and We're Going on a Bear Hunt. And the insects' haikus (with the critiques by the scorpion) are fabulous!


message 28: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 07, 2018 04:10PM) (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
I do realise that I have already listed Second Story Press's Gusty Girls series in the Canada thread. But ALL of the four books of the series feature a multitude of allusions to books, reading and writing (and often have the latter as main themes).

In companion books Home Free and Connecting Dots, writing is prominently featured (as in Home Free Leanna Mets wants to become a writer and in Connecting Dots, Leanna encourages her friend Cassie to finally in journal form write her life story, both for catharsis and for literary value, not to mention that L.M. Montgomery and her Anne of Green Gables is also prominently featured in Home Free).

Caroline Stellings' The Contest has as its main theme an Anne of Green Gables Look Alike contest with the main prize being a brand new set of the entire AOGG series.

And even in Becky Citra's Finding Grace, although the main emphasis is on Hope and her mother trying to locate Hope's twin sister Grace whom the mother had given up for adoption after Grace contracted polio as a toddler, there are again countless allusions to books, reading, writing and especially Hope is an avid reader (and has a whole slew of letters written to her "imaginary" friend Grace who though turns out to have been real).


message 29: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "A very funny book that teaches about caring for library books is Never Let a Ghost Borrow Your Library Book: Book Care Guidelines from Library Secret Service. All librarians are mem..."

These do look like potential fun, but only if my local library actually has them.


message 30: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I don't understand the point of The Not So Quiet Library at all. Even before the monster appears we have Dad feeding the boys donuts for breakfast, then going to the 'nap section' o..."

What happens in the library during a sugar trip? Indeed, it does sound very strange.


message 31: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments If we're counting books about readers and homages to other novels, I must mention The Hired Girl, a middle grades/young adult novel. It is sort of an homage of Anne of Green Gables and is about a teen girl in the early 1900s who loves to read more than anything, but her father, a farmer, doesn't value book learning. (view spoiler) The heroine's only world experience outside her farm comes from books. Her only books are Ivanhoe, Dombey and Son and Jane Eyre.

A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Complete Wreck are the most literate books I've ever read. The vocabulary is graduate level. Even I had to look up what some words meant and Lemony Snicket usually defines them "a word which here means...". Klaus, the middle Baudelaire child (yes their name is a tribute to Charles Baudelaire) loves to read. He's the thinker of the trio while his older sister Violet is the inventor.
Snicket tends to name his characters after literary people like Beatrice, Dante Alighieri's lost love, Edgar Allen Poe and also things like colophon and Dewey- Dewey is someone of legend who many do not believe exists. He has created a book cataloging all information of the V.F.D., obviously named after Melvil Dewey author of the Dewey Decimal cataloging system.

There are several important libraries mentioned in the stories as well, including one unusual special library underwater. I love the books. I didn't watch the Netflix series and didn't like the movie with Jim Carey. These are BOOKS meant to be read!


message 32: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "If we're counting books about readers and homages to other novels, I must mention The Hired Girl, a middle grades/young adult novel. It is sort of an homage of Anne of Green Gables ..."

I have to read The Hired Girl although I have to admit that I wish that instead of just running away from home, the heroine had also done something to shame her father.


message 33: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "If we're counting books about readers and homages to other novels, I must mention The Hired Girl, a middle grades/young adult novel. It is sort of an homage of Anne of Green Gables ..."

I have generally not enjoyed any movie starring Jim Carrey all that much.


message 34: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
A further middle grade (based in Canada) historical novel I have been meaning to read (and which also features the main protagonist writing some supposedly very very purple prose) is Mable Riley: A Reliable Record of Humdrum, Peril, and Romance.


message 35: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
I read the Series of Unfortunate Events several years ago. I liked them up until the last book, the ending of which was in keeping with the unfortunate events up until then, but I had hoped for a happier ending, with the kids being reunited with their parents. I did like all the vocabulary building in the stories.


message 36: by QNPoohBear (last edited Sep 09, 2018 04:21PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments I read Mabel Riley once but I don't remember anything about it.

Yes the ending of ASOUE is tragic and The Beatrice Letters adds more information on Lemony Snicket's past and future including what happened to the Baudelaires.


message 37: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "My children's librarian did find for me a lot of books about libraries, not surprisingly. I'll start reading them tomorrow. But for now let me suggest that a lot of "meta" fiction are books about b..."

On your recommendation, I got this book at my library. It is quite humorous, both story and illustrations. (view spoiler). I guess you wanted to know what his story was going to be before all the interruptions.


message 38: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Yes, I did. :)


message 39: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Other takes on the theme of the month to consider:

How about children facing challenges in learning to read? Maybe something like Three Cups of Tea (the youth edition), about building schools in poor communities. Or maybe the series Hank Zipzer: #1-10, about a boy who learns that he has a learning disability and gradually learns to deal with it.

Or maybe certain books about teachers, or children who know they want to teach. Maybe These Happy Golden Years, when Laura Ingalls Wilder was a (reluctant!) teenage schoolteacher.


message 40: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
I would love to read more about literacy. My library's catalog lists Baby Storytime Magic: Active Early Literacy Through Bounces, Rhymes, Tickles and More but the staff on duty couldn't find when I was there.

I also will read their e-book of Hot Dogs and Hamburgers: Unlocking Life's Potential by Inspiring Literacy at Any Age but that book is written for adults, so doesn't really fit here. (However, it does look like it would be fine for interested youth.)


message 41: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Btw, one place to browse, if you're the kind of library user who likes to do that, is Dewey 016.


message 42: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I would love to read more about literacy. My library's catalog lists Baby Storytime Magic: Active Early Literacy Through Bounces, Rhymes, Tickles and More but the staff on duty coul..."

Maybe one of the children's librarians was hoarding at their desk!?


message 43: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Perhaps!


message 44: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
I can't decide which of the following two books I like better; I'm glad my library had them both. Both are about brave, stubborn, adventurous women who devoted themselves to making libraries welcoming to children.

I read Librarian on the Roof! A True Story by M.G. King first. Exciting true story with lively cartoony illustrations. Very inspirational. Author's note. No bibliography, probably because this is basically a 'current event' and the flap photo reveals that King had access to Laurell. It almost makes me want to visit Lockhart, Texas, to see their new children's section.

Jan Pinborough's Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children is a more serious biography, suitable for schoolchildren doing research reports with notes and bibliography. But it's still engaging, not to mention inspiring, with charming illustrations. It takes place a century earlier, mostly in NYC.


message 45: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
When I asked the librarian today for children's books on literacy, she latched on to the idea of leveled readers. I can see her point.

But the book that caught my eye was Jeanne Steig and William Steig's alphabet book of 26 very silly poems Alpha Beta Chowder. They're nonsense poems abounding in words starting with the featured letter (or, in the case of 'X,' starting with 'ex') and crammed with high-level vocabulary words... iow, trademark Steig.

King Kang

Ken, the killer kangaroo,
Knows karate, plays kazoo,
Knits his keeper khaki kilts,
Clowns around on lacquered stilts,
Cockeyed, knock-kneed Kenny's quick,
If you cross him,
Ken
can
kick!

Note the different ways K can be spelled, or how it can be combined with other letters like N, C, and even H. Note the other ways to make the same sound that K makes. If reading that poem doesn't improve one's literacy, I don't know what will!


message 46: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 2265 comments Tomas and the Library Lady Based on a true story, Tomas is a child of migrant farmers in the 1950s. He misses his hometown in Texas when the family heads north to Iowa for the summer. He loves hearing his grandfather's stories but he knows them all already! His grandfather sends him to the local library where the librarian becomes his new friend and mentor. She helps him choose books that will transport him to new places, help his family learn English and he helps her learn Spanish.

This is a nice, simple story that emphasises the importance of books in feeding the imagination and improving literacy. With books, Tomas can visit places he's never been before like the time of the dinosaurs and the jungle. There's a brief biographical note in the book about Tomas Rivera

Book Fiesta!: Celebrate Children's Day/Book Day; Celebremos El dia de los ninos/El dia de los libros
Book Fiesta! Celebrate Children's Day/Book Day; Celebremos El dia de los ninos/El dia de los libros (Bilingual Spanish-English) by Pat Mora

The illustrations are so fun! They're super bright and colorful. The text is very simple and short-almost poetry but not. I didn't understand why each snippet of text has to end with "toon! toon!" is that supposed to be the sound of a horn? The book also includes an explanation of the holiday (Mexico's Children's Day) and how to hold your own fiesta.


message 47: by Cheryl , Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl  (cherylllr) | 6846 comments Mod
Oh I love the idea of a Book Fiesta! I'll have to see if I can get a copy of that.

The book about Tomas looks good, too.

Oh my towering Mt. TBR!


message 48: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "I can't decide which of the following two books I like better; I'm glad my library had them both. Both are about brave, stubborn, adventurous women who devoted themselves to making libraries welcom..."

I read the Anne Moore book a couple of years ago, but was unfamiliar with the Librarian on the Roof. It is in our library system, so I will be getting that one to look at. Thanks for the recommendation!


message 49: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2599 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Tomas and the Library Lady Based on a true story, Tomas is a child of migrant farmers in the 1950s. He misses his hometown in Texas when the family heads north to Iowa for the summer..."

I have read both of those books and liked both of them. I actually met Pat Mora several years ago when she was at a Texas Library Association function.


message 50: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 8814 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "QNPoohBear wrote: "Tomas and the Library Lady Based on a true story, Tomas is a child of migrant farmers in the 1950s. He misses his hometown in Texas when the family heads north to ..."

How cool! I have liked many of Pat Mora's picture books and Tomas and the Library Lady is a favourite.


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