Hugo & Nebula Awards: Best Novels discussion

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Random Chatter > What was the first novel/short story/novella that got you into Science Fiction?

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message 1: by Jeff (last edited Aug 25, 2018 04:17PM) (new)

Jeff F I was born a reader, because my Mom was a reader. I remember all my teachers and adult relatives commenting about it frequently, and in particuIar I remember my second-grade teacher saying that I was reading at a fifth-grade level, and I have Mom to thank for that. They all thought it was remarkable, but I thought it was no big deal - didn't everybody do it?
When I was in grade school, back before dirt was invented, I read Heinlein's Have Space Suit—Will Travel.
This was in the mid-1960's, when NASA's Moon program was going strong, so I was already leaning that way. Astronauts? Space travel? Oh hell yeah! Especially for a young boy. But then in 1966, a TV show debuted that hit this 8-year old right between the eyes. Star Trek! My doom was written then and there. And then, just three short years later, in 1969 the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey came out. Thanks to my older brother, I was already reading his Arthur C. Clarke books, and others I don't remember.
I don't remember much about the ensuing years, other than that I was totally S-F wired, until I got to my late teens. When I was 18, a friend handed me a copy of Piers Anthony's Macroscope.
And then when I was 20, my older brother gave me Robert A. Heinlein's The Number of the Beast.
And that was the book that sealed my Science Fiction future. I've been in it ever since, and haven't regretted a moment.
And you know what? Science fiction led (leads) to other intellectual pursuits. It was because of Heinlein that I became interested in Mark Twain. And Star Trek (yes, Star Trek!) caused me to look into Shakespeare, just to see what all the shouting was about. And, the shouting is justified.
How about you? Do you remember when and where you lost your S-F maidenhead?


message 2: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
A very interesting question. I started to read for my own pleasure about 7 years of age give or take 6 months. My earliest SF books should be about when I was 9. I cannot focus on which exactly was the first but among the earliest reads were:
The War of the Worlds
Deathworld 1
The Lost World
also there were some soviet writers [I grew up in the USSR] but their books most likely are unknown to you. When I was 11 I wrote a SF novel. It was awful of course.
At the age of 14 I read A Wizard of Earthsea and The Eternal Champion and this abruptly shifted me toward fantasy.


message 3: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 26, 2018 06:10AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
After I had reread over and over all the books about horses and all the Beverly Cleary Books and Narnia and all the books by Edward Eager, I decided that I was not going to read the stupid girl books about stupid girl stuff all the stupid girls were reading. Instead, I decided to read what the boys were reading. Heinlein juveniles. Jeff, I think the first was Have Space Suit—Will Travel for me, too! That's where Del Rey's Rocket Jockey came from, too.

I can still remember, exactly, the two library shelves over in the corner of the children's section of the library where they had the books for older kids . . .

BTW, the books by Edward Eager (not nec. in order)
Half Magic
Magic by the Lake
Knight's Castle
Magic or Not?
The Time Garden
Seven-Day Magic
The Well-Wishers
aren't half bad, even today, though more juvenile than the first Harry Potter just because of the times when they were written. In the very last one there's a kid with a leather jacket (oh, scary!)

I wish I could find this one series of horse books. Not Walter Farley. It's about a girl who lives on a farm with, like, Clydesdales, and she longs for a riding horse instead of a plow horse. There were several of them.


message 4: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
When I opened Heinlein for myself I was very impressed. The first novels were Orphans of the Sky and Citizen of the Galaxy. However, they appeared a bit later, maybe when I was 12 or 13.


message 5: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 26, 2018 07:10AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Citizen of the Galaxy was one of my early favorites though I think Have Space Suit—Will Travel was first. I loved all of the Heinlein juveniles. But at least two I never read until I was an adult, Starman Jones and Farmer in the Sky I was so happy to find them later, particularly Starman Jones

I also loved short stories (Angels and Spaceships) by Frederic Brown, even though they were in the adult section.


message 6: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
I liked Have Space Suit—Will Travel when I've read it, but I got my hands on it much later. What I like in RAH's juveniles, there are a pleasant read for an adult as well. Other SF books that impressed me in a tender age :) were:
The Caves of Steel, Foundation, The High Crusade, Time Patrol, City, Berserker to name a few


message 7: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
My father was a voracious reader and an early reader of sci-fi. From a very early age, I was encouraged to read, and allowed reading time before lights out. We always had books all over the house and I could read anything I wanted to. He was also a psychologist and Air Force veteran of three wars (WW II, Korea & Vietnam), so we had psychology, sci-fi, history, classics, popular novels, everything you can think of. So I was reading early, at a level well above my age. My dad also subscribed to the Ellery Queen and Fantasy & Science Fiction pulp magazines. He probably was into the earlier pulps but I never saw them (being military, we moved a lot). So I looked at F&SF early, which led me right into Heinlein & Asimov. The first time I recognized that I preferred a genre was when I read Foundation in the early 70's. Then I got into Heinlein, but not the Juveniles. Sadly, my dad passed away at the young age of 55, when I was 21, and I never had the chance to discuss sci-fi with him and hear of his early interest in it. That would have been interesting. A happy footnote, however: when my mom passed away in 2010, I was able to salvage some F&SF issues she had been storing. 105 issues dating back to 1954 and ending about 1972, including many of the classic authors we all know and love.


message 8: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
What a great way to start reading SF, Allan. My parents never read SF, though at some point my mom read a couple of books. I think she read Stranger in a Strange Land at some point, but I don't think she really liked it much. She was just polite about it. This was much later though. I had been reading SF for years.

She liked the Postman and the Mote in God's Eye, which I think she heard about on TV and asked me for them. Of course, I had them to loan her.


message 9: by Robin (new)

Robin Witte | 30 comments Dune started it all for me and its still in my to 5. From there I went to Asimov snd then to Heinlein. Which seems to be a theme in this discussion! C.S. Lewis and Tolkein were right there too. Joan D. Vinge was the first female writer I got into.


message 10: by Ed (new)

Ed Erwin | 722 comments Really hard to be sure. I can't even remember what I had for breakfast. (It was probably coffee.)

My best guess is A Wrinkle in Time.

Definitely not the first, but an early read with a big impact was the short-story version of Flowers for Algernon.


message 11: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Robin wrote: "Dune started it all for me and its still in my to 5. From there I went to Asimov snd then to Heinlein. Which seems to be a theme in this discussion! C.S. Lewis and Tolkein were right there too. Joa..."

You seem to be right about RAH, Robin. I guess there's a reason he's called "The Dean of Science Fiction." A lot of people today who read his early work claim he's all misogynistic, and perhaps he was to a degree (it's debatable), but it was the times in which he was living.
Speaking of "Dune," it's also in my top 10 if not top 5. I think David Lynch did a creditable job with the movie, considering the impossible task he had to accomplish.


message 12: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Ed wrote: "Really hard to be sure. I can't even remember what I had for breakfast. (It was probably coffee.)

My best guess is A Wrinkle in Time.

Definitely not the first, but an early read w..."


There's a book out there, Ed - let me see if I can find it... Ah, here it is:
The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume One, 1929-1964
This contains the short story of Flowers For Algernon which you mentioned.
And it also contains a marvelous collection of must-read classic S-F short stories, and I cannot recommend this book highly enough. There are also companion volumes to this book which are also quite excellent.


message 13: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Oleksandr wrote: "I liked Have Space Suit—Will Travel when I've read it, but I got my hands on it much later. What I like in RAH's juveniles, there are a pleasant read for an adult as well. Other SF boo..."

Hi, Oleksandr. I re-read the Foundation series not too long ago, and one small passage reinforced to me that Asimov was one of the greatest writers ever. It was in the second volume, where young Arkady was visiting her [grandparents? aunt and uncle?]. They were at the breakfast table, and the woman reached over for the salt, then changed her mind and put it back.
It was just a throwaway line, but Asimov included it anyway. It served no purpose to advance the narrative, but it was just a little touch, minisculely unimportant, that served to make the characters even more homely and real. It was something any one of us would do in an absent-minded moment, and the fact that he made a conscious decision to include it in the novel served to remind me that I was in the company of greatness.


message 14: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 27, 2018 10:04PM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Jeff, I know. People really think Heinlein had a problem with women, but I think it was just that social roles have (thank god) changed so much. I think he tried. I also think most of his major female characters are just his usual men characters in a female body, but I don't mind that.

Re: A Wrinkle in Time, I remember reading it in maybe the 6th grade and thinking, "Is that all?" But I was already totally addicted to Narnia at that point . . . it's a book that's good jumping off point for kids to get started in fantasy, though everybody has Harry Potter now.

Has anybody seen the movie of A Wrinkle in Time? Is it any good? I'm still reeling from how incredibly bored I was during a lot of Avengers: Infinity War. So should I bother with Wrinkle?


message 15: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Hi, Jeff. My take on the question of the authors that there are a lot of talented writers, who wrote things I vehemently disagree with, but that doesn't make them a bit less talented. To judge them with today's standards is wrong, but to point that they are not in line with today's standards is fine.
I also enjoy the 50s and 60s music, which for example quite often prescribes gender roles


message 16: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Well, so does music today . . . sometimes


message 17: by Robin (new)

Robin Witte | 30 comments Jeff, I loved that Heinlein tried to write female characters who were different. I gave him some leeway because of that. Plus, reading Stranger in a Strange Land and Friday really opened my eyes when I was a kid. I remember thinking, "Do my parents know what I am reading?" They did not!

Kate, I felt that the Wrinkle in Time movie left much to be desired. It's beautiful to look at, but quite boring to watch.


message 18: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Thanks, Robin. Maybe it will come on Netflix or Hulu soon, then


message 19: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (last edited Aug 29, 2018 07:55PM) (new)

Art | 2546 comments Mod
Thanks for putting this question to the group, Jeff. Seems like many of us had similar experiences (with a few exceptions), falling in love with sci-fi. My family's always had books around and in many ways I was exposed to their love and even reverence of multitude of authors of the genre. I don't remember any particular novel that got me on track, I do however remember going through volume after volume of sci-fi short story compilations. Sheckley, Zelazny, Asimov, Harrison, Bradbury always stood out and I started haunting my local library, so that I wouldn't miss the book I was interested in.

All that was back in the day when getting a book you wanted involved not only being in luck of finding the book on the shelf, but also buttering up to librarians (later, when traveling in European capitals, ridden with ancient churches I've seen gargoyles sitting on their steeples who had more charm and cheer), keeping an immaculate track record of returning books a few days before the return date (god forbid you returned it on the last day, let alone bringing it in overdue).

The brightest memories belong to the summer days of reading The Hobbit, Narnia Chronicles, then there was Dune and Martian Chronicles, Zelazny's Lord of Light has somehow always been there for me, I believe I've read it in at least three languages and I would be hard pressed to say when I actually read it for the first time. Starship Troopers, Alien, loads of Bradbury and Asimov.

I believe that sci-fi has an undisputed advantage over any other genre because it is so hard to make into a decent movie. There are hundreds of thousand of fantastic titles worth reading, but there are just handful of movies worth even mentioning. I believe every other genre is somehow easier to pin down, distill and repackage all the content into 120minutes of entertainment.

In any case, my journey's just begun and I'm going to leech off the collective wisdom of this group for recommendations for a long time yet.


message 20: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
The Thrill of the Hunt drives me to this day. Sure, the reading is the main thing, but you have to find it first! I love the feeling of finding that Nebula nominee or series book 3 that I'm missing. To Hell with buying used books in the internet! There is no satisfaction just looking it up and having it sent to your home. Where is the adventure?


message 21: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Allan wrote: "The Thrill of the Hunt drives me to this day. Sure, the reading is the main thing, but you have to find it first! I love the feeling of finding that Nebula nominee or series book 3 that I'm missing..."

I'm with you on that, Allan. My book source of choice is Half Price Books, and there's an independent used bookstore in an ancient rickety building in the Old Town area that's a treat to spend a couple of hours in, wandering around the narrow aisles with books to the ceiling. It's the smell, that wonderful smell. Smells like....
I could have all the books I want next week, but I would feel let down afterwards. Plus, I don't like doing business with Amazon all that much. But I may have no choice with one or two; I've been looking for years for a copy of The Forever Machine.


message 22: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
Half Price Books is my go-to spot. I live in San Antonio and have three stores in easy reach. My daughter goes to college near their flagship store in Dallas, near their corporate HQ, and it is literally the size of a Wal-Mart! I've hit a few others in Waco, Austin, Corpus Christi, but that one is amazing. I could just camp out in the sci-fi section. Excluding the ones I've already read this year, most of the 95 books I have from our list were found at HPB.


message 23: by Antti (new)

Antti Värtö (andekn) | 850 comments Mod
Many of you have fond early memories of Heinlein juveniles. Not me, though: I haven't read any of them. The reason is simple enough: none of them were translated into Finnish when I was a kid,and by the time I learned enoght English to start reading novels, I was teenager and I read what teenagers read (I think it was cyberpunk back then). From time to time I've thought that I probably should read "Have Space Suit...", but I've never gotten around it. Do you think that an adult reading it for the first time would appreciate it?

For me it was Asimov and Clarke who drew me in. Loved the Robots books, but I remember "Childhood's End" most fondly.


message 24: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Antti wrote: "Do you think that an adult reading it for the first time would appreciate it?"

Just try him. He influenced a lot of later SF so some stuff can be seen as he repeats others but it is other way round. Start maybe with The Puppet Masters just to have a taste


message 25: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
The puppet masters is not a juvenile, though.

I wrote a post about Heinlien juveniles which should be around here somewhere in this group's archives, but I have to go do something now. Maybe later I can find it.


message 26: by Jeff (last edited Aug 30, 2018 06:18PM) (new)

Jeff F Antti wrote: "Many of you have fond early memories of Heinlein juveniles. Not me, though: I haven't read any of them. The reason is simple enough: none of them were translated into Finnish when I was a kid,and b..."

I re-read it a few years ago, and it's still a rollicking adventure story, as long as you bear in mind that it was written before Man went to the Moon, and view it in that context. For example, there was not a computer in sight, and orbits were being plotted on slide rules!


message 27: by Art, Stay home, stay safe. (new)

Art | 2546 comments Mod
Double Star is another fine example of Robert A. Heinlein's work, not a juvenile either. No wonder he's dominated Hugos for years.


message 28: by Ed (new)

Ed Erwin | 722 comments Allan wrote: "Half Price Books is my go-to spot...."

They are nice. I like them. But it is sad that smaller bookstores struggle so much. The Half-Price Books in my town is in the same block that used to house "The Other Change of Hobbit" which was a long-lasting store specializing in SF books. Rising rents and competition from on-line stores forced them out. They tried to survive in a different location, but couldn't.

There is still an independent SF and Mystery book store in town called "Dark Carnival", but it, too, is struggling.

C'est la vie!


message 29: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Allan wrote: "Half Price Books is my go-to spot. I live in San Antonio and have three stores in easy reach. My daughter goes to college near their flagship store in Dallas, near their corporate HQ, and it is lit..."

That's my store, Allan! It's a drive across town, and there are other HPB's that are closer, but it's the one I go to first.
A few years ago, they rented out the Dallas Market Hall for a weekend and had a warehouse sale. Wow! I walked out of there with a shopping cart full of books for around 30 bucks, including hardcover copies of pretty much the entire Foreigner series by C.J. Cherryh. It was wonderful, and I wish they'd do it again.
PS: This is why I have 75 books on my to-read list. :)


message 30: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "The puppet masters is not a juvenile, though."

True. I just think that starting reading the master at older age calls for more mature novels first


message 31: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 31, 2018 11:41AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Well, I am not that crazy about the Puppet Masters. I'm sure he did it first, but now it's been done to death.

I say, if you are not starting with Juveniles . . . try The Moon is a Harsh Mistress After all, it is a Hugo winner.

2 things, though.
1) It's kind of America-centric--for one thing, July 4th becomes an important date, (but hey, he's American) and
2) If you start with his best book ever (arguably) then you have nowhere to go but down--of course, Heinlein's best is always better than most people's

Two of his books that I think are overlooked because they were written so early, but which I enjoy immensely are:
Sixth Column
and
Beyond This Horizon

I know I had a post where I discussed the juveniles, but I can't find it. Maybe later

(Later correction--Excuse me, I meant "Heinlein's worst is always better than most peoples'")


message 32: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "Well, I am not that crazy about the Puppet Masters. I'm sure he did it first, but now it's been done to death."

I started with it as an average (therefore more representative) Heinlein's work with all his 'features', like old wise figure, young protagonist who want to learn/advance, his promotion of nudism etc


message 33: by Robin (new)

Robin Witte | 30 comments I still love Tunnel in the Sky, it's my favorite juvenile of his.


message 34: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Another great start on Heinlein is The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag, one of his earliest, circa 1942. It is short and is a bit outside his later style, but I liked it when I finally got my hands on it.
Also a lot of his short stories are good


message 35: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 31, 2018 09:46AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Yes, Oleksandr, I agree that The Puppet Masters is representative.

I'm not that nuts about Double Star either, but it is a classic!

Not sure why. They just are not my favs. As a once-aspiring writer I should be able to figure out why. I just don't feel like reading them again.


message 36: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 31, 2018 11:38AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
I love Tunnel in the Sky, too. The post I cannot find about Heinlein juveniles talks about which ones I liked more and which were still good but not my faves. This is one of my Faves.

The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag is good, but I came across it later, after I had read almost everything else of his, so it seemed a little less exciting than some. I think it is one where he is honing his style, and you see these characters, with different names and problems, later. Actually, its male/female leads remind me of the Puppet Master leads, now that I think about it.


message 37: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "As a once-aspiring writer I should be able to figure out why. I just don't feel like reading them again. "

You too?!
Actually I never have been an aspiring author, but I tried to write several SF&F novels from age 11 to 16... finished one, and it is awful :D
Had a few ideas, later implemented by others, for example to show fantasy life from POV of an orc, whom I based on First Nations


message 38: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 31, 2018 11:32AM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
I don't know First Nations? Details?

I tried to write much later. No, I take that back. I tried to write a Nancy Drew at my grandmother's house for the weekend when I was a kid (nothing else to do there). It was terrible and I tore it up. I was probably around 10.

I came back to writing after people told me I could write. I was hacking around on the internet and found the site of some authors I had liked years before (still like, actually) and they had a little writing course. The first thing I wrote, they said it was publishable. But then, a few years later when I got laid off from my job, I found that, though I can write to some extent, I have not the ability to plot. In other words, though I can write dialogue, I have no story to tell.

I think maybe I should return to writing short-shorts with a punch line. At least my husband likes them.


message 39: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "I don't know First Nations? Details?"

I was told that what one calls Indians nowadays. An Idea was to have brave warriors in techno-primitive society (they cannot use iron, only bronze), hunted down by elves, who denigrate orcs. At the same time a bit of Nordic culture with berserkers and Northmen-like raids


message 40: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (last edited Aug 31, 2018 12:00PM) (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Ah. Thought they were native americans still. That's OK, it changes all the time. I try to keep up.

Oleksandr said Had a few ideas, later implemented by others, for example to show fantasy life from POV of an orc<-i>

So who implemented it and how can I get a copy? Were you involved with the implementation at all?

Now I cannot figure out how to get rid of the italics . . .



message 41: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
I started with The Puppet Masters and The Door Into Summer, both of which I loved. I thought Beyond This Horizon was terrible though. Then Methuselah's Children, The Past Through Tomorrow and Time Enough For Love.


message 42: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Oh, yeah! The Door Into Summer. What a great one!


message 43: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
Jeff, you're lucky to be so close to that store! Regarding the big sale, here they do a massive annual clearance sale, where they bring in clearance books from multiple stores and sell hardbacks for $2, paperbacks for $0.50 or a buck. They have it over a weekend in a vacant old Target store and just line up the books on folding tables. I actually take the day off work to go to it! My wife and I walk out with a few shopping bags of books for $40. In fact, it should be coming up soon!


message 44: by Antti (new)

Antti Värtö (andekn) | 850 comments Mod
I read "The Moon us a Harsh Mistress" when I was younger and I liked it a lot. Unfortunately the only other Heinlein books in my local library when I was growing up (and, consequently, only Heinlein books I've read) were "Sixth Column", which felt pretty shallow and, well, unrealistic even at age 12; and "Job: A Comedy of Justice", which I just found completely inaccessible and not enjoyable at all.


message 45: by Jeff (new)

Jeff F Kateblue wrote: "Yes, Oleksandr, I agree that The Puppet Masters is representative.

I'm not that nuts about Double Star either, but it is a classic!

Not sure why. They just are not ..."


I know, right? I read Double Star not too long ago. It was good, but I was left thinking, how the heck did it win a Hugo?


message 46: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Kateblue wrote: "So who implemented it and how can I get a copy? Were you involved with the implementation at all?"

From what I know it wasn't implemented exactly like I described, but there is a book [cannot find it] where half-orcs are the border-guards and there are quite many books now, which re-tell classical tales from villain POV


message 47: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Jeff, I do agree that Double Star just didn't seem like a Hugo Winner. It actually didn't even seem like SF except it was set in the future.

Here is a totally different question.

I think most of us have read the Heinlein Hugo and Nebula nominees and winners? Shall we take a poll? Perhaps there are some books that this group will never read because most everyone read them already. So should there should be a "rereading" nomination so that those few who haven't read them and those who want to re-read can? Should we find out if there are books that everyone has read already? (With a shifting membership perhaps this is futile?)

Discuss?


message 48: by Oleksandr, a.k.a. Acorn (new)

Oleksandr Zholud | 3996 comments Mod
Right now discussing RAH in another group (among other writers) and it seems a lot of people see him as a sexist and racist. While he has his serious blindspots, I see his as a progressive author for his time (at least his works from 1940 to the late 1960s). Can it be that choosing him as a re-read may be sensitive for some?


message 49: by Allan (new)

Allan Phillips | 2359 comments Mod
Personally, today I find Heinlein's books a bit stiff. Frankly, I'd rather read Asimov at this point, there are more of his that I haven't read & want to.


message 50: by Kateblue, 2nd star to the right and straight on til morning (new)

Kateblue | 4070 comments Mod
Yes, well, what I was really suggesting was that we consciously DON'T read Heinlein because we probably mostly all have. So assigning it in a different classification of rereads where you don't have to . . . see what I mean?

So forget the reread thing. I suppose it will be self correcting b/c noone will vote for the books they have already read . . . unless someone uses and ENC of course.

Never mind.


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