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message 1: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Have you read a book that you just couldn't put down? We'd love to hear about it! Share reviews of your recommended reads with your fellow patrons and help create some book buzz!


message 2: by Leda (new)

Leda | 1 comments Currently reading Macbeth by Jo Nesbro. A fresh, modern take on a classic reimagined by one of my favorite Norwegian authors. What’s not to like??


message 3: by Brittany (new)

Brittany | 2 comments Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. Don't miss out on this classic! Pure gothic suspense, beautifully written. Read for the first time many, many years ago and still tops my all-time favorite novels list.


message 4: by Jess (new)

Jess Witkins (jesswitkins) | 3 comments Brittany wrote: "Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. Don't miss out on this classic! Pure gothic suspense, beautifully written. Read for the first time many, many years ago and still tops my all-time favorite novels list."

This is one of my favorites, Brittany! If you like Rebecca, you may also enjoy This House is Haunted.

Perfect time of year for a good thriller!


message 5: by Brittany (new)

Brittany | 2 comments Jess wrote: "Brittany wrote: "Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. Don't miss out on this classic! Pure gothic suspense, beautifully written. Read for the first time many, many years ago and still tops my all-time fav..."

Thanks for the suggestion! It looks great, added to my TBR.


message 6: by Heather (last edited Sep 04, 2018 08:22AM) (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Leda wrote: "Currently reading Macbeth by Jo Nesbro. A fresh, modern take on a classic reimagined by one of my favorite Norwegian authors. What’s not to like??"

Thanks for sharing your recommendation Leda - sounds great, I'll have to check that one out! I really enjoyed Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood, a retelling of The Tempest which is also part of the Hogarth Shakespeare series.


message 7: by Barry (last edited Sep 20, 2018 05:28AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments I recently finished I'll Sleep When I'm Dead, an oral history of the “dirty life and times” of eccentric singer-songwriter Warren Zevon, who was most famous for “Werewolves of London.” Put together by Zevon’s ex-wife, Crystal Zevon, the book explores both sides of the “troubled genius” tag that was often applied to Zevon. His songs were sui generis and earned him a cult following (including many writers like Hunter S. Thompson, Stephen King, and Dave Barry), but the man battled serious demons and inflicted a lot of pain on his loved ones. It’s a fascinating but often tough read. I wouldn’t have minded more emphasis on his music. Best suited for fans of Zevon or connoisseurs of the rock bio genre.


message 8: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Great review Barry – and what a neat connection of King to Zevon – I recently saw that he dedicated his novel Doctor Sleep to him. Thanks for sharing an awesome recommended read!


message 9: by Susan (new)

Susan | 1 comments I just finished “A Gentleman in Moscow.” It was a wonderful book that began between the world wars and continued afterwards.


message 10: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Heather wrote: "Great review Barry – and what a neat connection of King to Zevon – I recently saw that he dedicated his novel Doctor Sleep to him. Thanks for sharing an awesome recommended read!"

That's awesome! Zevon even played occasionally with the Rock Bottom Remainders, a band that consisted of King, Dave Barry, Mitch Albom, Amy Tan, and a bunch of other writers. In general, he was much more comfortable around literary types than he was around fellow rock stars. It was one of many, many interesting aspects of his personality.


message 11: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "I just finished “A Gentleman in Moscow.” It was a wonderful book that began between the world wars and continued afterwards."

Sounds like a fascinating read Susan, thanks for sharing your recommendation!


message 12: by La Crosse (new)

La Crosse Public Library (lacrosselibrary) | 77 comments Mod
Here's a patron recommendation from Lindy, one of our library volunteers!

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland
Dread Nation

The Civil War has been halted. (Please note the language reflects the times!) Negro females ten and over are being sent to Ladies Finishing Schools to learn manners, how to assist “white” ladies and how to kill zombies. Yes Zombies!

Jane and Katherine break the rules of the finishing school at an educational lecture: Jane by carrying a revolver beneath her skirts and Katherine by wearing a bustle. Jane’s foresight saves several people when the lecture subject “turns” mid-lecture. Katherine’s offense almost keeps her from escaping. This is the kind of life available now and only clever and prepared people survive.

I found this a novel combination of inequality and discrimination in a suspenseful setting with fun, strong and resourceful characters. A sequel may lie ahead.


message 13: by Barry (last edited Oct 12, 2018 05:37AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments For a long time I’ve been meaning to reread the first four books of Stephen King’s epic “Dark Tower” series and then tackle the four subsequent installments. One down, as I just wrapped up The Gunslinger, which introduces readers to the character of Roland Deschain and his quest for the mysterious Dark Tower. The biggest strength of “The Gunslinger” is how it blends different genres together. You could call it a mystical western. It revolves around a stoic cowboy-like character, but there are elements of fantasy, horror, and medieval iconography. Also, it’s set in a different world, but one that's connected to ours in interesting ways. Not much is explained in detail. “The Gunslinger” tells an engaging story but, by design, it offers more questions than answers. It sets the stage for a much bigger mythology.


message 14: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "For a long time I’ve been meaning to reread the first four books of Stephen King’s epic “Dark Tower” series and then tackle the four subsequent installments. One down, as I just wrapped up [book:Th..." There's nothing like rereading your favorite series, thank you for sharing your recommendation Barry!


message 15: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Heather wrote: "Barry wrote: "For a long time I’ve been meaning to reread the first four books of Stephen King’s epic “Dark Tower” series and then tackle the four subsequent installments. One down, as I just wrapp..."

So true! Not too long ago I did the same with Lord of the Rings and the Chronicles of Narnia.


message 16: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "Heather wrote: "Barry wrote: "For a long time I’ve been meaning to reread the first four books of Stephen King’s epic “Dark Tower” series and then tackle the four subsequent installments. One down,..."

Excellent series indeed! If you like The Chronicles, you may also enjoy the Wingfeather Saga -first in the series is On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness – available in the library and on Hoopla for digital download.


message 17: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Thanks for the recommendation, Heather! I'm not familiar with that series but I'm looking forward to finding out more.


message 18: by Barry (last edited Nov 13, 2018 11:08AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Most recommendations of Flannery O'Connor come with several caveats. Her Southern Gothic stories, which touch on serial killers, con men, "circus freaks," refugees, and more, are often dark and violent, leaving you with an unsettled feeling. The language she uses reflects her early-to-mid-century Southern roots. Her work is full of Biblical symbolism/imagery that might not connect with all readers. One of her frequent themes is the destructive consequences of pride and self-righteousness. If you're still interested, then you should absolutely give her a shot. Her stories are so vivid and memorable. They merge the comic, the profound, the tragic, and the everyday in brilliant ways. I just finished reading her collection A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories for the second time, and I think I appreciated it more this time through because I wasn't so focused on what might be waiting for me at the end of the stories. My main word of advice: read the book slowly. Her short stories were not meant to be binged.


message 19: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "Most recommendations of Flannery O'Connor come with several caveats. Her Southern Gothic stories, which touch on serial killers, con men, "circus freaks," refugees, and more, are oft..."

It’s been years since I’ve read O’Connor’s works - sounds like a reread is in order! Thank you for the thoughtful recommendation Barry.


message 20: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Heather wrote: "Barry wrote: "Most recommendations of Flannery O'Connor come with several caveats. Her Southern Gothic stories, which touch on serial killers, con men, "circus freaks," refugees, and..."

She's the best! It's sad that she died so young but her contributions to the world of literature are absolute treasures.


message 21: by Barry (last edited Dec 26, 2018 09:07AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Of all the books I read in 2018, Keith Richards’ memoir, Life, was my favorite. If you’re at all familiar with the Rolling Stones guitarist, you probably know what a colorful character he is. Richards possesses a surplus of personality, and it’s fully on display in his book, which takes you deep into his life with the Rolling Stones, his harrowing struggles as a drug addict, his unceasing love-affair with music (especially the blues), and much more. The stories he tells are often insane, and the book as a whole is incredibly entertaining, engaging, intimate, and funny. It’s a portrait of someone who lived the rock star life, managed to survive and stay sane, and somehow emerged as a weirdly lovable figure.


message 22: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "Of all the books I read in 2018, Keith Richards’ memoir, Life, was my favorite. If you’re at all familiar with the Rolling Stones guitarist, you probably know what a colorful charact..."
Sounds like a fascinating read - thanks for sharing this review Barry!


message 23: by Barry (last edited Jan 14, 2019 02:45PM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments While doing research on something, I came across a reference to May Pang’s Instamatic Karma: Photographs of John Lennon and was happy to find out that the library has a copy of it. May Pang was John Lennon’s girlfriend during his infamous “Lost Weekend,” an 18-month period from 1973 to 1975 in which the ex-Beatle was separated from Yoko Ono. In “Instamatic Karma,” Pang collects many of the memorable photographs she took in that timespan. They show Lennon at work, at play, at ease, and in the company of fellow music legends like Paul, Ringo, Keith Moon, and Harry Nilsson. The best ones are of John and his son Julian, reunited after years apart. All in all, the book offers a warm and intimate glimpse into a very interesting and much-discussed period of John Lennon’s life.


message 24: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "While doing research on something, I came across a reference to May Pang’s Instamatic Karma: Photographs of John Lennon and was happy to find out that the library has a copy of it. M..."
Sounds like a fascinating find, thanks for sharing Barry! We also have Keith Richards: A Life In Pictures if you're interested in a bio pictorial book to compliment your last review of Life.


message 25: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Thank you for the recommendation, Heather! I'm going to check that out at once!


message 26: by Paul (new)

Paul Runnoe Been listening to the audio book of Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Fascinating, heart-wrenching, and funny all at the same time. He does a good job retelling his life story within the complex historical and cultural context of post apartheid South Africa. It's recommend it!


message 27: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Paul wrote: "Been listening to the audio book of Born a Crime by Trevor Noah. Fascinating, heart-wrenching, and funny all at the same time. He does a good job retelling his life story within the complex histori..."

Wow, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood sounds like a great read; no wonder this was named one of the best books of the year! The audiobook has been added to our Patrons Pick display and we also have print and ebook copies available. Thanks for the recommendation Paul!


message 28: by Barry (last edited Feb 19, 2019 10:50AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments A book about the recent global debt crisis really isn't my idea of a page-turner, but Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World turned out to be just that thanks to Michael Lewis’ brilliant abilities as a journalist. It tells the story of how countries like Ireland, Greece, Germany, and more piled up insane levels of debt, what the fallout was, and what each crisis had to say about the country in question. Lewis goes to each of these spots to survey the wreckage for himself. The best part is the colorful cast of individuals that he interviews. A group of Greek monks who somehow made a fortune off real estate dealings. An obscure Irish academic who ended up being prophetic. Arnold Schwarzenegger. And more. “Boomerang” was well outside of my comfort zone, but I’m glad I read it. Because of Lewis' gift for lucid storytelling and his nose for ridiculous details, it was both illuminating and entertaining.


message 29: by Heather (last edited Feb 25, 2019 08:30AM) (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "A book about the recent global debt crisis really isn't my idea of a page-turner, but Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World turned out to be just that thanks to Michael Lewis’ b..."

Thanks for sharing a great review reminding us to step outside of our reading comfort zone! In addition to applying his journalistic skills to writing books on the economy, such as The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, I was interested to learn that Michael Lewis also writes sports books and is the author of Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game and The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game which all were turned into films.


message 30: by Barry (last edited Mar 27, 2019 04:08PM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Here’s another Flannery O’Connor recommendation, but this time it’s one of her novels. Wise Blood tells the story of Hazel Motes, a God-haunted WWII veteran who returns to the States intent on establishing his own (anti)religion that doesn’t rely on any god or anyone else for redemption (“the Church of Christ Without Christ” he calls it). As this is a Flannery O’Connor creation, there are certain elements of “Wise Blood” that almost seem inevitable: the story takes place in the South, the characters are weird and/or unsympathetic, the tone is heavy and sardonic, and there’s no lack of theological symbolism and imagery. At the center of it all is Motes, who I think is one of the most fascinating protagonists in any book I’ve read. He strives to live a life of rebellion, but there are roadblocks along the way. That tension is at the heart of the story. It’s one of the main reasons (along with O’Connor’s vivid prose and biting sense of humor) why “Wise Blood” is such a compelling read.


message 31: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "Here’s another Flannery O’Connor recommendation, but this time it’s one of her novels. Wise Blood tells the story of Hazel Motes, a God-haunted WWII veteran who returns to the States i..."
Thanks for sharing your recommendation Barry! It's been added to our Patron Picks shelf for others to enjoy.


message 32: by Barry (last edited Apr 17, 2019 12:32PM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments One of my 2019 reading goals was to make it through a book of poetry. I can check that off after finishing a collection of T.S. Eliot’s work, Collected Poems, 1909-1962. Among the poems I read were famous ones like “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “Portrait of a Lady,” “The Waste Land,” “The Hollow Men,” “Journey of the Magi,” and more. It was often pretty challenging. To take the most extreme example, I watched a short documentary and listened to both a lecture and a podcast just to scratch the surface of “The Waste Land” (with its numerous literary allusions and references). But it was a rewarding experience overall, mainly because of the depth and beauty of so many of Eliot’s observations, turns of phrase, and introspective outpourings. “Prufrock” is an embarrassment of riches on its own. “There will be time, there will be time / To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet.” Or, “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.” Or, more comically, “Do I dare eat a peach?” I often found myself just basking in the power of the words, even if I didn’t understand everything.


message 33: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "One of my 2019 reading goals was to make it through a book of poetry. I can check that off after finishing a collection of T.S. Eliot’s work, Collected Poems, 1909-1962. Among the poe..."Thanks for your review Barry - glad to hear that this was a rewarding reading experience and great idea to checkout a podcast and a listen to a lecture to gain greater insight into The Waste Land - that is one tough poem to tackle!

Thanks for sharing an inspiring review and Happy National Poetry Month!


message 34: by Barry (last edited Jul 27, 2019 06:51AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments I doubt there’s much I can say about Something Wicked This Way Comes that hasn’t been said many times before. Ray Bradbury’s fantastical tale about two young boys and a sinister traveling carnival is a beloved, unassailable classic. It delivers on many levels. Memorable characters? Will Halloway and Jim Nightshade fit the bill. Same for Will’s father, Charles, and the main villain, Mr. Dark. Engaging plot? The story’s twists and turns keep you locked in from start to finish. Unique style? Bradbury’s adventurous prose bursts with color, exuberance, and lyrical ingenuity. Thematic richness? Bradbury covers good versus evil, the nature of temptation, the transition from youth to adulthood, the courage and wisdom of living in the moment, and more. To top it off, he also pays tribute to the houses of illumination and imagination that are libraries. If you love to read fiction, “Something Wicked This Way Comes” is one of those books that will remind you why.


message 35: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "I doubt there’s much I can say about Something Wicked This Way Comes that hasn’t been said many times before. Ray Bradbury’s fantastical tale about two young boys and a sinister trave..."

Wow, sounds like it checks all the boxes – thanks for a great new addition for my “to read” list! The description also reminds me of another title on my to read list: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by the captivatingly talented Neil Gaiman. So many books, so little time!


message 36: by Barry (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Heather wrote: "Barry wrote: "I doubt there’s much I can say about Something Wicked This Way Comes that hasn’t been said many times before. Ray Bradbury’s fantastical tale about two young boys and a ..."

It's funny you mention Gaiman, because he was heavily influenced by Bradbury. Of course, the same could probably be said of most horror/sci-fi/fantasy writers who came after Bradbury.

"Something Wicked This Way Comes" is a real joy. One of my favorite summer reads (despite being a thoroughly "fall" book).


message 37: by Barry (last edited Jun 24, 2019 09:35AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments If you’re ever interested in reading a thorough, accessible, and fair-minded study of Bob Dylan’s spiritual and “political” convictions, I’d strongly recommend The Political World of Bob Dylan: Freedom and Justice, Power and Sin. It explores Dylan’s background and his evolution as an artist and a person, using quotes, lyrics, and major life developments to tease out the general worldview of this enigmatic and at times inscrutable artist. You’ll read about his upbringing in northern Minnesota, his folk/protest period, his conversion to Christianity, and much more. What emerges is a portrait of someone with strong beliefs but a steadfast unwillingness to be boxed in or labelled. To the immense credit of the co-authors (one of whom, Chad Israelson, grew up in La Crescent and attended UWL), they take Dylan’s words and deeds at face value (as much as that’s possible, anyway) and draw conclusions accordingly. They don’t exaggerate or mythologize. They let the man speak for himself.


message 38: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "If you’re ever interested in reading a thorough, accessible, and fair-minded study of Bob Dylan’s spiritual and “political” convictions, I’d strongly recommend [book:The Political World of Bob Dyla..."Sounds like a well framed exploration of Dylan’s roots, the systems that he embraced and fought against and his resulting worldview - and what a cool local connection with the co-author! I’ll be recommending this to a friend who is a big Dylan fan – thanks for the great review.


message 39: by Barry (last edited Jul 26, 2019 11:20AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments If you’re on the hunt for a quintessential “summer read,” something entertaining, engaging, and escapist, you can’t go wrong with Stephen King’s Joyland. King combines elements of mystery, humor, romance, and detective fiction into a coming-of-age story that glows with the soft, bittersweet aura of nostalgia. He applies a much lighter touch than usual here. He’s in Americana mode, as exemplified best in the story’s amusement-park setting and the colorful jargon (“the Talk”) that all the carnies use. “Joyland” doesn’t ask much of the reader, but it still delivers in droves.


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "If you’re on the hunt for a quintessential “summer read,” something entertaining, engaging, and escapist, you can’t go wrong with Stephen King’s Joyland. King combines elements of m..."

Sounds like the perfect beach read - thanks for sharing Barry!


message 41: by Barry (last edited Aug 21, 2019 05:33AM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments I’m not sure I could recommend Infinite Jest to anyone in good faith. It’s far and away the most challenging book I’ve ever read. It’s looooooooong (almost a thousand dense pages of “story” plus two hundred dense pages of endnotes that you shouldn't skip). It’s non-linear. The plot throws convention to the wind. There are scads of characters. David Foster Wallace’s prose is often weird and experimental. His sweeping vocabulary will leave you with feelings of deep inadequacy about your own (some words are entirely of his own creation). Many sentences span the length of paragraphs. Many paragraphs span the length of pages. It’s sad and hilarious but more sad than hilarious. And yet, it was one of the most rewarding reading experiences of my life. I’ll cite three reasons (though there are more). 1) Genre-wise, it was worlds away from my comfort zone. 2) It was an accomplishment read (many have tried and failed to scale this particular mountain). 3) I read it with a close friend and a family member. Special emphasis on the last point. Reading it in tandem with others greatly enriched the two and a half months I spent in the strange but distressingly familiar world of “Infinite Jest.” So I’ll end by saying, if you ever give this book a shot, don’t go it alone.


message 42: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Barry wrote: "I’m not sure I could recommend Infinite Jest to anyone in good faith. It’s far and away the most challenging book I’ve ever read. It’s looooooooong (almost a thousand dense pages of “st..."

Wow, this sounds like quite the reading quest! I was intrigued by your review and discovered this title made the top twenty Goodreads List for Most Begun “Read But Unfinished” (Initiated) Book Ever and the top ten on the Most Difficult Novel list – way to go on finishing this epic journey!


message 43: by Julia (new)

Julia Van | 4 comments I have recently read "Where the Crawdads Sing" by Delia Owens. Owens was an unfamiliar author to me, but she did not disappoint. Her writing style is so fluid and beautiful that it was almost hard to focus on the storyline itself! Her novel was such a complex web of romance and mystery and suspense, and the ending left me SPEECHLESS. I cannot say enough good things about this book,


message 44: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Julia wrote: "I have recently read "Where the Crawdads Sing" by Delia Owens. Owens was an unfamiliar author to me, but she did not disappoint. Her writing style is so fluid and beautiful that it was almost hard ..."

Thanks for this enticing review Julia – I can’t wait to read this novel!

While this is Delia Owens’ debut novel, she is an established nonfiction author of three books about her life as a wildlife scientist in Africa: Cry of the Kalahari, The Eye of the Elephant: An Epic Adventure in the African Wilderness, and Secrets of the Savanna: Twenty-three Years in the African Wilderness Unraveling the Mysteries of Elephants and People.

Also, if you enjoyed this novel and are looking for similar reads, search Where the Crawdads Sing in Encore, our online catalog, select the title and scroll down to the bottom of the page where you will find a list of read-alikes that you might also enjoy!


message 45: by La Crosse (new)

La Crosse Public Library (lacrosselibrary) | 77 comments Mod
Here's another recommendation from Lindy, one of our volunteers.

Wanderers by Chuck Wendig, published 2019
Genre: Science Fiction (so far!)
Nessie, a fifteen year old honor student, is the first Wanderer. She leaves her home and begins to walk purposefully across the country joined by other Wanderers one by one from all ages, over 15 and below 60, and all walks of life. Nessie’s sister Shana is unable to “wake” her or any of the other Wanderer’s and she and other family members trail the group as shepherds to their flock of Wanderers. Where are they going? How do they maintain their energy without eating or sleeping? What is protecting their skin from injury as they walk along the back roads of several American states over any obstacles placed in their path?
At the same time, a mysterious disease is spreading throughout the world, puzzling the CDC and international sources with its virulence and causing widespread contagion and fatalities. CDC officials are torn between attending to the two catastrophes as are most of the world’s scientists.
Add to this mix a rabidly right minister who airs radio broadcasts choosing to call the Wanderers Demons, and a group of stereotypical redneck reformers with a sadistic leader who plan to shoot the Wanderers down.
My husband and I both found this an attention getting page turner (all 782 pages!). He is more a hard science guy and had some difficulty with the science but thought the main disease premise was absolutely possible. I found the characters, other than the caricature-like bad guys, compelling and realistic in their humanity.
SCARY!


message 46: by Barry (last edited Sep 25, 2019 03:37PM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Now that fall has officially arrived, it’s time to pick up a book appropriate for the season (if you haven’t already). Something dark, something creepy, something with crunchy leaves underfoot. My recommendation is Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Jackson is best known for “The Lottery” and “The Haunting of Hill House,” but “Castle” deserves to be mentioned with those classics. It’s a short and methodically paced book, but it packs a punch, thanks to Jackson’s plainspoken prose and her incredibly memorable characters. You won’t soon forget the experience of entering the mind of Merricat Blackwood, the young and eminently untrustable narrator of the story who lives with her older sister and their doddering uncle just outside a small village. For reasons I won’t divulge, the Blackwoods lead a very isolated and scorned existence. As the plot unfolds and secrets are revealed, the tension surrounding the family only builds and builds. It’s a riveting story.


message 47: by Jess (new)

Jess Witkins (jesswitkins) | 3 comments Barry wrote: "Now that fall has officially arrived, it’s time to pick up a book appropriate for the season (if you haven’t already). Something dark, something creepy, something with crunchy leaves underfoot. My ..."

Love this book! I agree, Barry, that anything by Shirley Jackson is a great creepy read for the season. I highly recommend the audio version of this story, and for fans of film adaptations, there's a new movie out by the same title and is available in our library system!

Another one on my to read list is a biography about the author called Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life which is also in our library system. You may be interested in that one too as a fellow fan.


message 48: by Barry (last edited Sep 26, 2019 01:48PM) (new)

Barry Lenser | 30 comments Jess wrote: "Barry wrote: "Now that fall has officially arrived, it’s time to pick up a book appropriate for the season (if you haven’t already). Something dark, something creepy, something with crunchy leaves ..."

Thanks for the heads up about that biography, Jess. Jackson was an incredible writer. Such a shame she died at a relatively young age. I'm sure there was plenty left in her imagination.


message 49: by Julia (last edited Oct 11, 2019 09:47AM) (new)

Julia Van | 4 comments I just finished reading I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter. This book, while its reading level is a little lower, really packs a punch. It is cunning and witty, while still maintaining a YA feel to it. I would definitely recommend to those looking for an interesting, fast read with minor twists and turns. You will fall in love with the narrator's commentary and different outlook on life. This book will make you laugh, cry, and wonder what is going to happen next!


message 50: by Heather (new)

Heather | 23 comments Mod
Julia wrote: "I just finished reading I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter. This book, while its reading level is a little lower, really packs a punch. It is cunning and witty, while still main..."

Sounds like a great read indeed! Linda, our Teen Librarian also recommends: The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo and Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero if you're looking for similarly compelling, character-driven, coming-of-age stories.


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