Drop Everything And Read discussion

50 views
Debates > Should schools/parents censor what teenagers read?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 57 (57 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Some school libraries censor certain books - usually with excessive profanity or sexual content, while (surprisingly) some do not care. Meanwhile, there are also parents who are not comfortable with what their children are reading and ban those books in their homes. There have been incidents where parents requested the teacher assign different books for class because they were not comfortable with their own child reading something.

But do you think teenagers should be 'protected' from inappropriate content in books? Do you think they can even be protected, given that all this content is everywhere? Music, television, media - you can find swearing in the hallways. Do you think this is bit efficient or helpful? Or do you think this is the best for their safety?


Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Sorry if I am waffling on.

I do believe there are books only for 18+. I do think the ones that are not 18+ should not have any inappropriate content. I think they will think what is shown on books is right. At adolescence you are still learning from what is right and what is wrong. Teenagers will feel peer-pressured and will not be ready for some particular life events in the future.

Sometimes teenagers start to do bad things far to early.

Swearing is one of the things that need to be censored and aren't the things they should normally be saying. I know sometimes when you rant you can't help what you say. But most teenagers do not think before they speak. This might bring them in serious trouble and escalates to a lot of conflicts.

I definitely think pornography and explicit images should definitely not be in a teenagers hands. At adolescence you are pressured to do most things. Sometimes you want to feel like you want to fit in with others. Teenagers are way to early and young to understand these things. Adolescent is where a person starts puberty. They may end up posting naked picture of themselves in the internet and it goes against the E-Safety.

This isn't just in books but all forms.

Well having less of explicit content will reduce teenagers from getting anxiety. It won't completely stop someone from these problems but it will reduce them.

Usually in TV swearing is censored during 6am-9pm. Some argue that kids should not be watching TV after 9pm.

I don't think it is really efficient but it is better than nothing which won't be effective at all. I do think there are other ways to help reduce this. I think parenting is one of them. Plus there are other methods too.


message 3: by Phoenix~They/Them (last edited Aug 21, 2018 07:34PM) (new)

Phoenix~They/Them I'll read books about violence, fights, death, and swearing and I won't become violent, I won't start fights, I won't threaten to attack and kill people. Different people do different things, some people may be violent, may start fights, or follow what happens on the book while others may not, doesn't mean that 18+ books shouldn't be "not for teens" cuz everyone is different, when I was younger I was able to read books in like I started reading novels in 5th grade. I read books 2 grades ahead of me, I likes action, I enjoys adventure, those were really important in my childhood, now if I couldn't have read things like that I would be bored, some people take on different things, some people are actually pretty good. I dont think it matters what someone reads when they are teens, I can understand censoring for little kids but come on this is the real world, we hear swearing everyday, at school, at work, at home. So even if you avoided it in books, kids will still pick up bad habits from others, like lets say smoking for example. Some teens start smoking some teens dont, then some teens pick it up from friends to look cool. Think of it as a trend, "everyone is doing so why not me" is someone's thoughts.


I G2G to bed sorry if this is confusing


message 4: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Eisenmeier (carpelibrumbooks) | 80 comments No. It's impossible to protect them in this day and age. Also, personally, I think it's important for everyone, teenagers included, to be exposed to different ways of thinking, different cultures, etc, even if it means being exposed to sex and cussing. One of the best ways is through books.


message 5: by Creative Orange (last edited Aug 22, 2018 05:58PM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments I do believe their should be a age gap bo0ks just for 11-18.

I think most books are not targeted specifically just for adolescence.

If there were less of the swearing in books it will reduce the amount. Reading books is one factor. But I think all factors need to taken account together.

It is very difficult to control your environment and not able to hear what is around you.

Like me nothing gets pass my ears. I'm a really good listener. However I am able to adapt to the things to I hear making sure I don't expose them. In 2018 it is getting really difficult for someone to think before they speak. I do think the person's upbringing is affecting them.

The more we reduce the swearing in the media, books or any format we are able to make an effort.

I shall repeat myself. All factors need to be solved together to make this work.

Keep that in mind that there are by average 82% of humans that are over 18.

That 82% is what we need to think about when we treat those who are not 18+ who use false language.

I think the problem is increasing by year because we have the internet now. And internet is very large.


Phoenix~They/Them Books without swearing, like I said before will not reduce the amount of swearing, and like I said before its mainly because some kids hear swearing from someone else, I didn't start swearing because of books, I started swearing because of my brothers, on the bus there is a lot of swearing, even for younger kids since they hear it coming out of the mouths of older people, books dont affect many people, its the environment that does, what people a person hangs out with, what their parents act like, its not just books or internet that influences people, they could still hear it in the hall, everywhere, and its harder to censor that, plus as teenagers we're growing into mature adults so censoring things in pointless(Im not good with facts honestly)


message 7: by Creative Orange (last edited Aug 22, 2018 07:56PM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Sylveon~Raven wrote: "Books without swearing, like I said before will not reduce the amount of swearing, and like I said before its mainly because some kids hear swearing from someone else, I didn't start swearing becau..."

Actually books with no swearing will reduce the swearing. Like I said it is one of the factors. The reduction is very slow. The things what kids hear is also one of the factor. But like I said all factors need to be reduced together.

Yes you have started swearing from people around you. But that doesn't mean reducing swearing in books will not work.

We are talking about millions of people in this world in the internet.

If there were swearing in books it will cause more damage.

There are knock-on effects. Just like diseases.

That is why I mentioned that there are all factors affecting it.

Having no swearing in books is easy for an author to not to use.

Actually as teenagers they are still not used to things to things they need to do in the future. They are still learning.

And also swearing affects a person education.

That is why school wish books to be censored. Teachers are there to teach you from what is right and wrong. And all teachers must encourage a student to read. But make sure of the safety of their students.


Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Melissa wrote: "No. It's impossible to protect them in this day and age. Also, personally, I think it's important for everyone, teenagers included, to be exposed to different ways of thinking, different cultures, ..."

I agree


message 9: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Just a reminder that we are not only talking about swearing, but also other things like explicit content. Besides, not just young adult books, also classics. In addition, there was an incident where the parents didn't want their child to read To Kill a Mockingbird in English class. What about that?

(This topic is for profanity in books.)


message 10: by Jess (last edited Aug 23, 2018 03:33AM) (new)

Jess Penhallow | 35 comments I will start this off by saying that i do not have children myself so maybe my opinion will change when I do but I hope not.

I don't know where the rest of the people on this thread come from but I would assume it's the US.

I am always amazed at how fixated parents in the US are on sexual content and swearing but they have no qualms about extreme violence. This mainly comes across in films but also in books.

Every review on booktube has a question on it with "Is this suitable for a 13/14/15 year old" and people replying no because there is swearing!

When I was 13 I was reading books with swearing and watching TV shows with swearingbut I hardly ever swore then and still don't now because I wasn't in an environment where swearing was the norm. But if I'm going to read a book set in a setting where swearing would be the norm (e.g. a battlefield, a sports team etc) it makes the voices of the characters more genuine if they speak how they normally would.

In terms of sexual content. I think this can also be addressed in a way that is suitable for teenagers. The Girls series by Jacqueline Wilson handled this perfectly in my opinion) and I read those books when I was 12. Teenagers need to learn about sex and relationships and it is better that they learn it from books that tackle the subject realistically than from the pornography or unrealistic romance books that they will seek out if they don't learn about it from other sources.

Of course there are different levels of maturity and some children may be more sensitive than others. However, it is better again to use moments where they are upset or confused by a book to start a discussion.

Also, you never know what is going to upset a child or teenager so it's impossible to guard them from things. Another personal example, I remember the most upset I ever was by a book was reading a middle grade/YA book that was set in an orphanage. There is a scene where the 'evil' matron of the orphanage shoves a dirty rag into the protagonists mouth because she talked back to her and she chokes on it. That scene, which I read when I was about 10, upset me more than anything else I read as a child/teen because of how vividly it was described. Nothing to do with sex or swearing but possibly something that was not suitable for it's target demographic (this book was written at a time when corporal punishment was the norm so probably was not as upsetting to children at the time who may have encountered such punishments in their life).

What I'm trying to say is that it is impossible to shield teens from things that you don't like. Censoring books only shuts teens off from a big bonus of books which is opening up their world to different people, cultures and experiences that they should be learning and talking about.


message 11: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments I come from the UK.


message 12: by Creative Orange (last edited Aug 23, 2018 05:19AM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Hallie wrote: "Just a reminder that we are not only talking about swearing, but also other things like explicit content. Besides, not just young adult books, also classics. In addition, there was an incident wher..."

I don't think To Kill a Mockingbird has any reference of explicit content. Parents shouldn't be quick to fixate to every book a child reads.

In some books with some sexual references are actually aloud as long it is not explicit. If a book contains just a kiss it is okay other means of sexual references are not really aloud. Sometimes in books, especially books written in 19th and beyond century a person may use different use of the language to cover up a sexual seen. Like Romeo and Juliet.


message 13: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Jess wrote: "I will start this off by saying that i do not have children myself so maybe my opinion will change when I do but I hope not.

I don't know where the rest of the people on this thread come from but ..."


I agree with you completely.

I do think a use of different language is needed to the minds of an adolescence. And I agree with you. Sex is taught at most classes at high school. I am sure you would have learned it in your Biology, Religious Studies and English about Sex.

The ones that should not be in another persons hand is a book filled with words that should not be used and pornography.


message 14: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Eisenmeier (carpelibrumbooks) | 80 comments Jess wrote: "I will start this off by saying that i do not have children myself so maybe my opinion will change when I do but I hope not.

I don't know where the rest of the people on this thread come from but ..."

Good point. One of the kids I used to babysit would play really violent video games, and I know there are kids who watch crime shows like Law and Order and CSI at 14....


message 15: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Eisenmeier (carpelibrumbooks) | 80 comments Sylveon~Raven wrote: "Books without swearing, like I said before will not reduce the amount of swearing, and like I said before its mainly because some kids hear swearing from someone else, I didn't start swearing becau..."

Good point.


message 16: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Also we are talking about parents. Not all parents will understand books and they are no longer teenagers. Parents are not all experts of these sort of things.


message 17: by Heather (new)

Heather 100% I believe that parents should censor what their kids are reading. Garbage in, garbage out.


Phoenix~They/Them But why Heather


message 19: by Creative Orange (last edited Aug 23, 2018 08:12AM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments I think in some circumstances a parent doesn't need to control to what their kids are reading. They can tend to be overprotective and need to see their kids progress.


Savannah- Quad Motherin' Book Readin' Diva (quadmom2005) I think the majority of my issue with some books, especially a classic such as To Kill a Mockingbird may come in comfort level IF the novel is being read aloud.

I remember VIVIDLY being the only black student in a classroom being forced to read Tom Sawyer out loud. It was a nightmare and I'd likely pull my kids from any classroom where they were expected to endure it.

I realize that's a very specific case but there it is. Its what comes to mind when the topic comes up. I think when we start talking about whats appropriate sexual content that's when we vere into parenting choices and opinions and those are SO individual that there won't be any satisfying or accommodating entire classrooms of parents when the kids come from such diverse backgrounds.


message 21: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments I agree with you Savannah. I also think there needs to be proper level of maturity when discussing about something sexual that can be taught.


message 22: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Cross | 18 comments no , the first books I read were ian flemmings james bond books, I think I was about 13 , followed by Jackie Collins and all sorts then a few years later I was reading the harry potter books kind of like Stephen king I just picked up books that were lying around and have all ways had a book in my hand , these days a book or a kindle


message 23: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
How old are you now?


message 24: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 05, 2019 02:01PM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments No. Kids should not be stripped of chances to mature. And, in many schools/games/places they can come across a lot worse than pretty much any book could dish out.

Of course, there are some horrible books out there that most adults would do good to get protection from. Still, that's part of the reading deal:
- to learn to discover what works for you and what makes your eyes figuratively bleed,
- to find out how to read and what to read and what for, what to skip, what can be read out there, what different genres are about,
- to know what's trash and what's beautiful, and
- how to tame your bookshelf.

PS. How exactly can kids learn anything worthwhile, if all is sterile? History? Biology? Ethics? Sociology? First aid? Basic medicine? They just might grow up thinking life's about unicorn poop and rainbows...


message 25: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Cross | 18 comments ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ wrote: "No. Kids should not be stripped of chances to mature. And, in many schools/games/companis/places they can come across a lot worse than pretty much any book could dish out.

Of course, there are so..."

and its most of what you said at the bottom of your post that put me off of reading for many years until I read the ian flemming james bond series whilst sitting through boring lessons at school


message 26: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 06, 2019 02:01AM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Matthew wrote: "☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ wrote: "and its most of what you said at the bottom of your post that put me off of reading for many years until I read the ian flemming james bond series whilst sitting through boring lessons at school "It's just that all these subjects can be either presented as basically disemboweled versions of themselves, shortened and simplified to be 'academic' and 'purified' of all 'difficult' or controversial topics instead of interesting and challenging and stimulating and giving food to independent thought and showing different sides to everything.

There's a reason why so many people enjoy reading pop sci, sci fi, all kinds of puzzles and brain teazers and ... and so not many cherish reading some or other texbook on smth 101...

Kids are way smarter than we give them credit for and when they are spoonfed BS, their subconscious makes sure the dose is minimised :)


message 27: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Arabella wrote: "I’m currently ten"

Arabella, I'm afraid you should be at least 13 to be in this website. As the moderator, I'm extremely sorry, but I will have to remove you.


message 28: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 06, 2019 01:56AM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "Arabella wrote: "I’m currently ten"

Arabella, I'm afraid you should be at least 13 to be in this website. As the moderator, I'm extremely sorry, but I will have to remove you."

That's an interesting development :) And that's how kids are being behaviorally trained to lie by our 'protective' society.


message 29: by Creative Orange (last edited Feb 06, 2019 05:09AM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments They should censor what we read. And I am up for it. Ages under 18 should not read such terribleness.


(Not saying I haven't read books that is over my age because I have. That is where I have sneakily done something wrong on purpose. I am a strange one. I have felt guilty reading books with words that I can't take in general.)


But I do think books as this should not be hands on kids. Research shows if children under the age of 18 read books as this they should be aware of it. It affects them psychologically and it messes with their cognition. We can't stop a child from reading them because it is not that possible. But it is the parents job for their children to be well.


Phoenix~They/Them I've been reading books since I was five, Harry Potter books since I was in grade school, and books one grade above me growing up so I don't really think it should be censored out unless it contains things like sex(Seriously, sex can be traumatizing and I'm sure children shouldn't be reading about it), I don't think a lot of swear words should be censored as children grow up in that environment so they'd learn to swear anyway


Phoenix~They/Them Click on the edit membership, then click leave group on the top, pretty self explanatory from there


message 32: by Shae (new)

Shae West (karsynshae) | 48 comments I agree with Pheonix.
Although there are certain swear words that should be censored....to me it depends on the teen. How mature is the teen? And how does the teen act on his/her own?


message 33: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Before a person swears. Maybe they should try researching the meanings of the words and try to judge whether these words are sexual or not.


message 34: by Creative Orange (last edited Feb 06, 2019 05:15AM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments Depending on where you live but where I am from, it is illegal for schools or local library to purchase books or anything with uncensored books. That includes banned or challenged books. I think there is a grey area on challenged books. Schools is about teaching kids the right morals. Censored books encourages school to do this. It is just part of their system.


message 35: by Creative Orange (last edited Feb 06, 2019 05:29AM) (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments According to my librarian there are some schools have different views. Apparently to most Catholic Schools will ban Harry Potter.

'One school to ban Harry Potter was St. Mary's Island Church of England school in Chatham, Kent. Head teacher Carol Rockwood explained that "The Bible is very clear and consistent in its teachings that wizards, devils and demons exist and are very real, powerful and dangerous and God's people are told to have nothing to do with them." She added that "I believe it is confusing to children when something wicked is being made to look fun.”'

This is what they have said. I can't say I agree with them. But from the school it is what it is.

Here is a PPT site from a power point to show censorship and schools. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/i...

Ask yourselves this: Why is censorship an issue in relation to the materials children should encounter in schools?


message 36: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ wrote: "Hallie wrote: "Arabella wrote: "I’m currently ten"

Arabella, I'm afraid you should be at least 13 to be in this website. As the moderator, I'm extremely sorry, but I will have to remove you."
That..."


So you're saying.....?


message 37: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 07, 2019 10:47AM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ wrote: "Hallie wrote: "Arabella wrote: "I’m currently ten"

Arabella, I'm afraid you should be at least 13 to be in this website. As the moderator, I'm extr..."
So, I'm saying that in our lovely haste to 'protect' kids from reading, we, as a society, fail them. We instill rules banning kids from grown up sites, hide books from them and not just porn but absolutely good books)...

As a result, we get a bunch of generations that
- are totally immature in their 20s... 30s... 40s... you name it,
- who are shocked, triggered etc by pretty much everything,
- who live in Faceboook (even I would probably have lived in FB. had the best of this world aka books been banned to me as a kid...),
- who are bullied pretty much everywhere (yes, I can easily see how a kid unable to deal with reading Dreiser will also be unable to deal with a bunch of mean kids bent on being mean),
- who live in rosy unicorn worlds (yes, I'm looking at those inept millenials who can't work unless it's all gamificated, made intense and interesting and adventurous and... For Pete's sake, people have been doing accounting and other boring jobs since ages and were ok to do it but NOW, it needs to be gamificated... Wonder why.... Obviously, kid books and games and other immature stuff don't give them any kind of preview to reality and... kaboom! lifes turns to be first a shocker and then, a downer.
- AND who know that often being sincere can result in unfair consequences, such as 'protection' from a book site by removal :) Which is, sadly, a behavioral training in lies... I'm sorta sure that the next time she gets to some site above her age, she'll be hush about personal details that can get her kicked out...

PS I'm NOT saying that bullying or being trigger-prone or anything is only a problem of immaturity or of certain kids. They are NOT. But a certain degree of resistibility, of being able to be strong, knowledgeable, to roll with the punches, to stop reading that shocking or ugly or unpleasant book, to be able to have independent ideas, to know what they want in life and in career and in choosing reading material... all of this and more, none of this has ever threatened anyone.

Since ages, kids could sign up to adult libraries under a grown up's supervision. What's so different about GR? Mind it, I'm not about to find talks with young kids satisfying and intellectually stimulating... I'm not her parent and don't care if you kick YAs out. But I can't help wondering what kinds of weird shit should I expect from youngsters in, like, 10 yrs. I'm gonna gave to work with those kids when they grow up, you know? And I can't help feeling it's gonna be a real pain in the butt.


message 38: by Creative Orange (new)

Creative Orange (Rumell Khan) (rkrespectedmember) | 2542 comments I am confused.


message 39: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (last edited Feb 07, 2019 10:57PM) (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Misericordia, while I do agree that this need to 'protect' kids from anything boith futile and unnecessary at times, in this particular case, I have to do this. Goodreads could literally get in trouble with the law for allowing someone under age of 13 on here.

A few years ago, my friend who was nearly 18 at that time, got catphised on Goodreads. I've also seen pedophiles extracting nudes from minors after meeting them on here. They were older than 13, and they still couldn't be 'protected'. But would you want to let your own child be a victim such sexual predators? I could care least about the ages of the members here, but one of the instructions to the moderators include removing underage members if we know about them. Goodreads isn't "different" - the COPPA puts it and every other website in legal trouble if they allow members younger than 13 to participate in their services - unless, of course, it's a site like Club Penguin, where their content is different. Maybe it gives the kids a reason to lie about their age, but isn't made by me. Yes, maybe they will lie protect themselves next time, and yes, there is only a certain amount of 'protection' we can all offer. I could say more, but this is not the place. It's a whole different topic from what we have going on right here.

Bella, once again, it could land Goodreads in trouble if they let you participate here, and read my above comment directed to Misericordia - I've explained how online predators can put you at a risk. You being mad at me is not going to change anything for me - or for Goodreads. So kindly listen when I say you have to leave, because Goodreads can block you as many times as they want if they figure you're back. Anyone who realizes that you are 10 may report you, and you will thereby be banned. It's not about how much personal information you give out; it's more than that, and you need to understand the seriousness of it. If you'd like to challenge the terms, go to Goodreads, not me.

Edited to fix typo.

Now back on topic: Should schools/parents censor what teenagers read?


message 40: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 07, 2019 11:37PM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Bellabooksisback wrote: "Hi Hallie! I’m not sure if you know this, but you got me banned. But it’s fine! I forgive you! The reason I got banned was for being “underage” but it’s not like I’m giving out personal info. Besid..."
Bella, do pay attention, she explicitly WROTE you are banned due to being young:
Hallie wrote: "Arabella, I'm afraid you should be at least 13 to be in this website. As the moderator, I'm extremely sorry, but I will have to remove you."
Not just from group but from the site altogether. My opinion on which I stated clearly above.

In Hallie's defense, it's her job as a mod to ban kids and she didn't invent this immensely stupid rule. So, do not be mad at her, she's just at work.

Once again, that's how our world works: first they will ban you from books site, then (when you become of age) they will instantly start demanding that you are a well-read and a well-rounded and a socially adapted person. All the best luck to you in this life-long quest!


message 41: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 07, 2019 11:33PM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Rumell wrote: "I am confused."
You see this thread as scrambled because Arabella's profile was removed along with all her posts. (Arabella is a reader who was provoked by Hally, a mod, to admit to being underage (ten) and suffered removal of her profile as a consequence.)

Hallie wrote: Goodreads could literally get in trouble with the law for allowing someone under age of 13 on here."Yes, I know. GR needs to cover its ass in such cases. Had I been advising it, I would have told them to do it myself.

I was speaking out about our society in general, not saying that GR needs to change. Though, it does. It loses audience of growing up potential readers. The habits people develop in their youth are tremendously difficult to overcome later, so dependency on GR would be a good thing for GR.

றϓқі૯ wrote: "@Misericordia and Bella, it is not Hallie's decision. she is only following Goodread's rules and you need to just deal with it.
schools/parents censoring what teenagers read is not goin..."

Thank you, I know. I advise on policy structuring and risk management professionally, among other things.... It doesn't prevent me from thinking it's all crock. Plus, it's plenty clear I'm ranting about society not GR rules or any particular mods....

றϓқі૯ wrote: "schools/parents censoring what teenagers read is not going to stop them from reading it so there is no point " Sadly, while I'm sure no kids will skip watching/reading porn, many definitely will skip reading quite a lot of GOOD books, just ones raising difficult topic... So, perversely, this social attitude is promoting explicit porn by banning it and demoting reading as a practice.


message 42: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 07, 2019 11:30PM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "A few years ago, my friend who was nearly 18 at that time, got catphised on Goodreads. I've also seen pedophiles extracting nudes from minors after meeting them on here. "
It's all crock. And it's all widely known things you didn't really need to spell for me.

Catfishing? Who can be catfished at GR? About what? It's a reading site and I literally can't imagine how a bunch of sock accs can hurt anyone? Just block them all, ignore and delete teir comments and voila! You've learned to deal with catfishing...
Another thing, I really wouldn't want to hire that 18-y old gal who can't tell a bunch of online trolls to just go do smth constructive... How's she gonna live with skills like that?

You can't extract anything (including nudes) from anyone who knows how to be safe online. And what's gonna be of those kids when they grow up?

People and kids particularly should be trained in the ways of safety procedures (i.e. don't post your photos, real name, address, occupation particulars, salary, any info you don't want to see discussed in Times). And your post actually illustrated my points to perfection. Our society is gonna become a special snowflakes gathering in the years to come. It's already beginning.
(It's not GR idea or Club Penguin idea or whatever, I know it, you don't need to explain it! But our society IS insipid.)

Hallie wrote: "my above comment directed to Misericordia - I've explained how online predators can put you at a risk. You being mad at me is not going to change anything for me - or for Goodreads. So kindly listen when I say you have to leave, because Goodreads can block you as many times as they want if they figure you're back." The only thing she's gonna learn from this exchange is some sneakiness. And this is behavioral training our kids to lie. Just like I said above.


message 43: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
It has its own advantages and disadvantages - but that, like I said, is a whole different topic.


message 44: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
I see you've edited your comments multiple times, and I neither want to spend my time refreshing the page to say what I think, nor do I wish to continue this topic here. If you think pushing people in front of a speeding bus should help them develop the agility to run and save themselves, that's your opinion, and you can't change the society's mindset by arguing with me. I agree - we can't protect anyone from anything, and even when I'm talking about the actual debate topic here, I would only say that it's of no use trying to protect. But at least in this group, I'd rather teach people to watch out for speeding vehicles instead because I don't wholly agree with you. I'm not saying lock them up at home and never expose them to the horrors.

That said, I can't do anything about this. And the course of the discussion seems to have drifted far off from the original debate topic, and I'd love for it to be back on course. Please drop the topic here.


☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "
I see you've edited your comments multiple times, and I neither want to spend my time refreshing the page to say what I think, nor do I wish to continue this topic here. If you think pushing people in front of a speeding bus should help them develop the agility to run and save themselves"

Hallie, YES, people edit their comments, while writing them. It's NORMAL practice. One just needs to wait until they actually FINISH typing. I was responding to different people so I added my reactions to different posts as I was getting free minutes to flip through forum...

Hallie wrote: "If you think pushing people in front of a speeding bus should help them develop the agility to run and save themselves" RIDICULOUS. Is reading is the equivalent of speeding bus for some people these days?

Hallie wrote: "I'd love for it to be back on course. Please drop the topic here. "This discussion IS on course. My part of it. Since the topic is:'Should schools/parents censor what teenagers read?' And my thoughts ARE expressed above.

In contrast, your part of this discussion is OFF-topic: GR risk management, extricating her age from that gal and banning her, nudes photos, your friend who gets catfished on GR - all this is largely very tangential to the topic...


message 46: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Please, just stop. You seem to be misconstruing my posts, or I'm not talking clearly enough (more likely that it's the latter), but please only stick to the book aspect of it. I said those things as an example for Bella, and like I said over and over again, both of these are separate and leave it separate.


message 47: by Deepthi (new)

Deepthi (d-star) | 22 comments I agree with Hallie. Those are two different topics and this is not the place to discuss it. Please stop it.


message 48: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 08, 2019 12:54AM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "Please, just stop. You seem to be misconstruing my posts, or I'm not talking clearly enough (more likely that it's the latter), but please only stick to the book aspect of it. I said those things a..." You can stop anytime. Don't make it as if I'm victimizing you. What the hell? You started going off-topic... I just posted my thoughts on the topic. You don't like my views? It's ok to debate.


message 49: by Hallie, I'm all about the books (new)

Hallie (inkyhallie) | 5470 comments Mod
Basically, should parents have control over what their children read?


message 50: by ☘Misericordia☘ (last edited Feb 08, 2019 12:56AM) (new)

☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣ (misericordia) | 12 comments Hallie wrote: "Basically, should parents have control over what their children read?"

Why are you changing topic? The initial one was broader: Should schools/parents censor what teenagers read?


« previous 1
back to top