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RwS Fall 2018 > 20.5 Singled Out

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message 1: by Kate S (new)

Kate S | 6265 comments Singled Out: How Two Million Women Survived Without Men After the First World War, read a book with a single female as the main character. The woman may be never-married, widowed, abandoned, etc, but should be the main character and obviously head of her own household.


message 2: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary | 3116 comments Elizabeth, do the next three Elizabeth Taylors work for this one?
Palladian
A View of the Harbour
A Wreath of Roses


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Rosemary wrote: "Elizabeth, do the next three Elizabeth Taylors work for this one?
Palladian
A View of the Harbour
A Wreath of Roses"


I'm planning on Harbour and Roses for this - hoping neither of them making what would be a drastic mistake for the task and gets married or takes back a husband - and it looks as if Palladian qualifies too. (I'm using it for the sub-challenge.)


message 4: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary | 3116 comments Haha re drastic mistake ... okay I will put them down as probables for this task.


message 5: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 2597 comments I'm probably making this too complicated in my mind, so would like to ask: does this book seem to fit the task The Water Rat of Wanchai ?


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Valerie wrote: "I'm probably making this too complicated in my mind, so would like to ask: does this book seem to fit the task The Water Rat of Wanchai ?"

I don't see any spouse mentioned in the description so it looks as if it will fit.


message 7: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 555 comments Does head of her own household imply that she should have children?


message 8: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 2659 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Valerie wrote: "I'm probably making this too complicated in my mind, so would like to ask: does this book seem to fit the task The Water Rat of Wanchai ?"

I don't see any spouse me..."


I can confirm no romantic entanglements in this book.


message 9: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 2659 comments Does Night and Day fit? I can't tell and I don't want to read too much of the reviews... I prefer not to know too much about the book before I delve into it.


message 10: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 2659 comments Rachelccameron wrote: "Does head of her own household imply that she should have children?"

Not necessarily. She could be responsible for younger siblings or her grand/mother etc.


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Rachelccameron wrote: "Does head of her own household imply that she should have children?"

No, she needs to not be living with a partner.


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Tien wrote: "Does Night and Day fit? I can't tell and I don't want to read too much of the reviews... I prefer not to know too much about the book before I delve into it."

I haven't read this and cannot say for sure, but I would be leery for this task and would have a backup plan just in case.


message 13: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 2659 comments will do, Elizabeth, thanks!


message 14: by Ed (last edited Aug 19, 2018 08:16PM) (new)

Ed Lehman | 2518 comments Can someone verify that Smilla's Sense of Snow works here? The description indicates the main character is a loner...and the original title (or alternative title) apparently was/is Miss Smilla's Feeling of Snow.


message 15: by Rosemary (last edited Aug 20, 2018 03:08AM) (new)

Rosemary | 3116 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Rachelccameron wrote: "Does head of her own household imply that she should have children?"

No, she needs to not be living with a partner."


What if she is a child/woman living with her parents?

To add to Ed's question, in Smilla's Sense of Snow (view spoiler)


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Ed wrote: "Can someone verify that Smilla's Sense of Snow works here? The description indicates the main character is a loner...and the original title (or alternative title) apparently was/is Mi..."

Yes, that works.

Rosemary wrote: "What if she is a child/woman living with her parents?"

The single woman should be an adult. Yes, she may live with others (a parent, employer), but be more or less independent.


message 17: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 1469 comments Although I've read some Agatha Christie books, they haven't been the Miss Marble series. Would Murder at the Vicarage work?


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Connie wrote: "Although I've read some Agatha Christie books, they haven't been the Miss Marble series. Would Murder at the Vicarage work?"

I think all of the Miss Marple books would work for this task.


message 19: by Rebekah (new)

Rebekah (bekalynn) | 4480 comments Does the character in My Name is Mary Sutter stay single?


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Rebekah wrote: "Does the character in My Name is Mary Sutter stay single?"

Perhaps someone who has read it can chime in, but it sounds as if the answer to your question might be somewhat of a spoiler, so a PM might be better. Still, I skimmed several good reviews, and find nothing that would indicate she is anything but single throughout.


message 21: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) | 4659 comments If a woman lives alone by choice, but does have a boyfriend that she sees occasionally does it work here?

Killing Grounds by Dana Stabenow


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Karen Michele wrote: "If a woman lives alone by choice, but does have a boyfriend that she sees occasionally does it work here?

Killing Grounds by Dana Stabenow"


Yes


message 23: by Coralie (new)

Coralie | 2545 comments Does the single female have to be human? I am reading Sea of Rust and the main character is a single female robot.


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Coralie wrote: "Does the single female have to be human? I am reading Sea of Rust and the main character is a single female robot."

Does this robot live independently?


message 25: by Coralie (new)

Coralie | 2545 comments Yes. The humans were killed in the human/robot war thirty years before (with flashbacks so it fits 20.4) and since then she has been living independently.


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Coralie wrote: "Yes. The humans were killed in the human/robot war thirty years before (with flashbacks so it fits 20.4) and since then she has been living independently."

Yes, you can use it for this task.


message 27: by Coralie (new)

Coralie | 2545 comments Thank you.


message 28: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 2659 comments I've just finished Warcross (Warcross #1) by Marie Lu which I was going to use for 10.7 but I think will fit here. Main protagonist, Emika Chen, is 18. She's been orphaned for a number of years and is responsible for herself. No marriage or any other dependence throughout the book. Works for this task, yes?

YA with 810L. Just thought I'd get the approval here before posting.


message 29: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) | 4659 comments Does the single woman have to be 18? In this adult book, the protagonist is 17 but lives on her own as an adult (and as a man) in the old west.
Whiskey When We're Dry


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Karen Michele wrote: "Does the single woman have to be 18? In this adult book, the protagonist is 17 but lives on her own as an adult (and as a man) in the old west.
Whiskey When We're Dry"


That one is fine for this task. (Not going to stick my neck out and say that *all* 17-year olds will, though.)


message 31: by Karen Michele (new)

Karen Michele Burns (klibrary) | 4659 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Karen Michele wrote: "Does the single woman have to be 18? In this adult book, the protagonist is 17 but lives on her own as an adult (and as a man) in the old west.
[book:Whiskey When We're Dry|36..."


Thanks --- I'm in the middle of this book and it definitely "feels" like a fit;)


message 32: by Beth (new)

Beth Robinson (bethrobinson) | 1118 comments Does the woman need to be unmarried the entire book?

I am reading Crocodile on the Sandbank and I know Peabody marries Emerson before the next book, so presumably it is going to be mentioned as a "happy ending" element in this one. Does that disqualify it?


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Beth wrote: "Does the woman need to be unmarried the entire book?

I am reading Crocodile on the Sandbank and I know Peabody marries Emerson before the next book, so presumably it is going to be..."


I just glanced at a couple of reviews, one calling Peabody a spinster, another "an independent woman" so I think you can use this for this task.


message 34: by Deedee (new)

Deedee | 1983 comments I'm reading The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock (2018) by Imogen Hermes Gowar. There are 2 main characters: a widower; and a 27 year old woman. The woman lives with a female maid/companion (it's set in the 18th century) making a household of 2. So far the widower and the woman have not met (I'm about a fourth of the way through the story). Would this count for this task? Even if the widower and the woman meet later in the story, and, perhaps, get married?


Elizabeth (Alaska) | 12773 comments Deedee wrote: "I'm reading The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock (2018) by Imogen Hermes Gowar. There are 2 main characters: a widower; and a 27 year old woman. The woman lives with a fem..."

Meeting later, even having a romance is fine. They should not get married, although a wedding could be anticipated at the end.


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