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Author Chat > JG Ballard

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message 2: by Antonomasia (new)

Antonomasia | 2629 comments N.B. Above article starts with NSFW picture. Text seems like a decent introductory guide to Ballard.

J.G. Ballard (1930-2009). English novelist, short story writer, and essayist.

Novels

The Wind from Nowhere (1961)

The Drowned World (1962)

The Burning World (1964) aka The Drought

The Crystal World (1966)

The Atrocity Exhibition (1970) aka Love and Napalm

Crash (1973)

Concrete Island (1974)

High-Rise (1975)

The Unlimited Dream Company (1979)

Hello America (1981)

Empire of the Sun (1984)

The Day of Creation (1987)

Running Wild (1988)

The Kindness of Women (1991)

Rushing to Paradise (1994)

Cocaine Nights (1996)

Super-Cannes (2000)

Millennium People (2003)

Kingdom Come (2006)


Short story collections

The Voices of Time and other stories (1962)

Billennium (1962)

Passport To Eternity (1963)

The 4-Dimensional Nightmare (1963)

The Terminal Beach (1964)

The Impossible Man (1966)

The Overloaded Man (1967)

The Disaster Area (1967)

The Day of Forever (1967)

Vermilion Sands (1971)

Chronopolis (1971)

Low Flying Aircraft And Other Stories (1976)

The Best of J. G. Ballard (1977)

The Best Short Stories (1978)

The Venus Hunters (1980)

Myths of the Near Future (1982)

The Voices Of Time (1985)

Memories of the Space Age (1988)

War Fever (1990)

The Complete Short Stories (2001)

The Complete Short Stories: Volume 1 (2006)

The Complete Short Stories: Volume 2 (2006)

The Complete Stories of J. G. Ballard (2009) [Goodreads combines this with the 2001 Complete Short Stories.]


Non-fiction

A User's Guide to the Millennium: Essays and Reviews (1996)

Miracles of Life: Shanghai to Shepperton: An Autobiography (autobiography; 2008)


message 3: by Antonomasia (new)

Antonomasia | 2629 comments Well, I didn't know before that how many short story collections Ballard had published.

Acknowledgements to Hugh's Angela Carter list, which I used as a template for the above, with publication list from Wikipedia. If anyone spots a missed book, do say.

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As I've probably said before on GR, Ballard is one of those authors I feel like I've read more of than I actually have. Several friends (majority not in the M&G group) are fans, all around the same age and I'm used to hearing about his books and seeing posts about them; by osmosis, it feels obvious what Ballardian means. Ballard was often talked about in British indie culture of the 90s and seemed like an author one should have read - touchstones included Joy Division's 'Atrocity Exhibition', championing of Ballard by Will Self on Radio 1, and the release of the film of Crash and publication of Cocaine Nights, both in 1996. A bit later, in TV comedy, we got the allusion to Super Cannes in the name of Peep Show character Super Hans.

I'm not sure - and curious - if Ballard seems as big a deal, as much of a classic, to people outside Britain, or to Brits under 35 (?..30?), or for that matter to those in the UK who just didn't notice this much media coverage of him in the late years of the 20th century.

I agree with the author of the article Lee posted above that Empire of the Sun seems so different, it's like the work of another author. It was something it was quite safe to be seen reading by a strict parent who'd seen the film adaptation, whereas bringing a copy of Crash into the house would have been quite a different matter.

Concrete Island is a book I still think about regularly, even though it's about ten years since I read it. I had a strong sense of déja vu through most of it, although the title was unfamiliar before it was selected by a book group that, in the end, I couldn't be bothered to go to. The character marooned in the parallel world of a roundabout seemed to connect with me as someone who had moved long distances (by British standards) several times and got used to starting on my own in relatively cheap, and not always entirely salubrious areas of cities.
Ballard always good on urban isolation / alienation and on prescience.


message 4: by Antonomasia (new)

Antonomasia | 2629 comments A new book, Applied Ballardianism: Memoir from a Parallel Universe by Simon Sellars.
Guardian piece about it, shorter than some back-cover blurbs.


message 5: by Lee (new)

Lee I've read Concrete Island a few times and read a few chapters again the other day. It's impossible to tire of, and I often wonder just why that is. I tend to re-attribute the Scorsese quote about Cronenberg. "I go to his films to find out who we are. So upsetting." Something like that.


message 6: by Alysson (new)

Alysson Oliveira | 90 comments I've read my share of Ballard (High rise, Crash, Kingdom come, and some stories), but I still have some books I bought and want to read. I liked a lot these books I read.

And after I learned the Booker polemic when Empire of the sun lost to Hotel du Lac, I added this book to my to-read list.


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