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The Golden Lion of Granpere
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Archived Group Reads 2018 > Golden Lion: Week 4: Ch. 14-17

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message 1: by Renee, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Renee M | 1861 comments Mod
Ch 14-17
•Does Trollope convey any insights into the lot of women in his time?
•Do you find the older generation to be realistic? What of the younger characters?
•In what way does Marie resolve to end her engagement? How does her uncle react?
•What reasons are given to coerce Marie into a marriage she clearly does not want? Do you see any of these as valid for her time and circumstance?


message 2: by Linda (new)

Linda | 115 comments Marie's decision in how to end her engagement reveals the essential conflict she faces. She has found enough independence to end the engagement and to reveal the truth about why, but as she still remains fearful of her uncle because her sense of duty and obligation to him still has a hold, she sends the letter in secret so Michel cannot intervene with its posting. This conflict is not only hers but a social argument in the later 19th century as well, with some championing women's new found sense of self and others decrying anything which would wound the the ideal of the "angel in the house".


Rosemarie | 186 comments I think her uncle has taken a stance he might be regretting, since he will lose Marie if she marries the other suitor, and he will also lose his son.
I am glad Marie is standing fast. She would rather never get married than marry a man she doesn't love. If only her uncle could get that through his thick head!


message 4: by Linda (new)

Linda | 115 comments The narrator has been making comments along the way that if Michel had understood the true nature of Marie and George’s feelings, he might have acted differently. Now it seems that both Marie and Michel both face problems arising from their sense of duty. Michel feels he has a duty to abide by his word of honor to Adrian that Marie will finally be his bride.


Rosemarie | 186 comments Sometimes it is very hard for a person to admit they made a mistake, especially some one so strong minded as Michel.


message 6: by Renee, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Renee M | 1861 comments Mod
I struggle with Michele. I certainly believed that he would side with Marie & George if they would only be straight with him, but now I wonder if that was merely a reflection of what he told himself on the subject. (Perhaps because he unconsciously suspected a liking between them??)

I absolutely believe that he thinks Urmand is a viable suitor and the match is a good one for Marie. But I wonder if there was ever a time when he would have agreed to a marriage between Marie & George. I suspect that he would have been sure he could do better for her. ... And, maybe, that George could do better as well.


message 7: by Renee, Moderator (new) - rated it 3 stars

Renee M | 1861 comments Mod
I particularly love Chapter 14. The way Trollope shows us George’s thoughts as he drives away. His prejudice in summing up Marie’s behavior to himself and then the narrator pointing out all the things George doesn’t understand about Marie.

And, then, how his thoughts turn to how he’ll go & beat up on Urmand. So human and funny.


Clarissa (clariann) | 526 comments Renee wrote: "I wonder if there was ever a time when he would have agreed to a marriage between Marie & George. I suspect that he would have been sure he could do better for her. ... And, maybe, that George could do better as well.."

I think the narrator says, I am not sure in Michel's voice or his own, that Michel would have agreed to the marriage he was only upset because they hadn't consulted him which undermined his position of authority. If George had come to him and asked permission than it's implied he would have granted it, but he is angry that the two young people have acted on their own. Or that's how I understood it anyway!


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