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Marketing Tactics > Any CrowdFunding experiences, thoughts?

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message 1: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments I have been looking into starting a crowdfunding campaign for the debut novel I am writing.

My intention is to use a platform such as Kickstarter, IndieGogo, GoFundMe, etc. So far my research tells me that in order to secure a few thousand dollars or more toward publishing costs, you need to already have an established social media following.

For me that amounts to maybe 4,400 Followers on Twitter, 5,000 on LinkedIn, and about 2,300 on my Facebook account. Barely a ripple in an ocean of attention seeking. However I also plan on trying to get some relevant "influentials" on my side.

I know this topic was discussed up to a year ago in this group, and have read those threads. Would be happy to exchange ideas with anyone who comments now. :-)


message 2: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments WOW.

Way more followers than I have. Would love to get more information on these platforms as well.


message 3: by Wanjiru (new)

Wanjiru Warama (wanjiruwarama) | 198 comments You have more followers than most authors. And to think I've been gloating for having a total of 8K. Initially, I doubt it's the mega numbers; IMHO it's whether we have the chops to turn those followers into readers.


message 4: by Phillip (last edited Aug 10, 2018 01:26PM) (new)

Phillip Murrell | 367 comments A friend of mine used Publishizer. He had around 330 pre-orders. The more preorders, the bigger the publisher that asks to work with you. I haven’t tried anything like it, but he seemed to have a lot of success.


message 5: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Wanjiru wrote: "You have more followers than most authors. And to think I've been gloating for having a total of 8K. Initially, I doubt it's the mega numbers; IMHO it's whether we have the chops to turn those foll..."

I know what you mean. I had a mini party when I reached 50 on Facebook!


message 6: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Kaylee wrote: "WOW.

Way more followers than I have. Would love to get more information on these platforms as well."


Hi Kalee. Initially I joined a group called ASMSG. It's a mutual support group for indie authors. You "like" their pages, they reciprocate. Plus oodles of sharing on marketing methods.

More recently I have automated my follows/unfollows on Twitter via ManageFlitter, whose paid service toils away while I focus elsewhere. Still a slog, though.


message 7: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Wanjiru wrote: "You have more followers than most authors. And to think I've been gloating for having a total of 8K."

You now have 8,001, Wanjiru - assuming, of course, you accept the invitation I just sent on LinkedIn to connect. :-)

You are absolutely right about it being being a mixture of quality and quantity of followers. I doubt mine are very engaged, although I feed them a consistent (automated) diet of interesting re-tweeted content relevant to the themes in my novel.

By the way, your write very well!


message 8: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Phillip wrote: "A friend of mine used Publishizer. He had around 330 pre-orders. The more preorders, the bigger the publisher that asks to work with you. "

Thanks for pointing this out, Phillip. I'd looked briefly at Publishizer as a possible crowdfunding platform. My initial thoughts:

They claim to be "the world’s first crowdfunding literary agency." Which means what? You, the wannabe published author, submit a book proposal via their online form. No manuscript required. (Liking that part lots).

"For 30 days, publishers receive a weekly round-up that includes your proposal. Use our promotion tools to gain increased exposure." I'm wondering if this means fork over dough, we cook the algorithm.

"Pre-sell copies of your book on Publishizer to unlock a direct pitch to the inboxes of traditional advance-paying publishers." Not sure what the quality of these publishers is.

"Publishers express interest, and you can respond to the publishers you’re interested in. We offer support and guidance through to signing a publishing deal."

I wonder what the author's percentage is on all those pre-orders.


message 9: by Phillip (new)

Phillip Murrell | 367 comments Mark wrote: "I wonder what the author's percentage is on all those pre-orders"

Unfortunately, I can’t answer any of those questions because I’ve never tried a crowdsourcing method. I just noticed Publishizer wasn’t mentioned and a friend had good results with it. He was happy with them, at least.


message 10: by Angela (new)

Angela Maher (angelajmaher) | 43 comments Having a lot of social media followers is good, but it doesn't mean that will translate into donations, especially for a debut book. Have you got shorter works published that people can read? If not, I'm sorry to say, you probably won't be able to generate many funds. A successful crowdfunding campaign needs a hook that gets people to cough up money. You need fans eager for the next book, or a connection to your local community, or it's going to be raising money for charity, etc.
Perhaps look into Unbound or Inkshares, instead. Or perhaps you might qualify for an arts grant.


message 11: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Walker (jetplague) | 33 comments So which is better then?

Patreon, Kickstarter, Publishizer.....

I might try Patreon to see what it's like. Kickstarter didn't really seem that good.


message 12: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 779 comments At first I never understood the point of crowdfunding but then I looked into it and thought it was a good idea. I would strongly consider it however I feel like it would be really difficult for me to get people to fund money. I may need to build up my following first


message 13: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Angela wrote: "Having a lot of social media followers is good, but it doesn't mean that will translate into donations, especially for a debut book. Have you got shorter works published that people can read? "

Good idea, Angela. I do have some short stories that are unpublished. I was thinking of collecting them and publishing a short e-book. Any suggestions on whether I should use it as a free giveaway, or try to sell it on Amazon?

Regarding your advice about a connection to community, I am going to try and liaise with some influencers in the fields of Down Syndrome, Intersex, Biodiversity and Abortion. I know, quite the mixed assortment. But those are among the key elements in my novel.

My thinking is that these influentials might help me publicize a crowdfunding campaign. Of course, I might just be barking into an abyss.


message 14: by Haru (new)

Haru Ichiban | 255 comments I have been wondering this for a while myself.
I know how to build a huge following by doing the method it is listed here--a lot of people at deviantArt do it by mass-faving/watching. But how many of those will even care?
I have very few followers in all media, but maybe it is a good thing to show off a big number even if they don't care?


message 15: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Mark wrote: "Phillip wrote: "A friend of mine used Publishizer. He had around 330 pre-orders. The more preorders, the bigger the publisher that asks to work with you. "

Thanks for pointing this out, Phillip. I..."


It sounds like a great opportunity, but I've been burned one too many times. Would they charge a fee or take part of the percentage once you signed with a contractor? Would part of the contract have to include them? Too many questions that need to be answered. I suppose we could always try to reach out to someone that's done that before for more insight.

Thanks for the add!


message 16: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Justin wrote: "At first I never understood the point of crowdfunding but then I looked into it and thought it was a good idea. I would strongly consider it however I feel like it would be really difficult for me ..."

I think mine would be difficult. I feel like for some of those larger crowdfunding platforms you would NEED a crowd in order to help you see anything out of it.

I have heard that Kickstarter has a lot of fees for helping you reach your goals. So, in essence, you'd need to put a higher dollar amount on the release and what you need.


message 17: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Mark wrote: "Angela wrote: "Having a lot of social media followers is good, but it doesn't mean that will translate into donations, especially for a debut book. Have you got shorter works published that people ..."

Mark, you could always try a GoodReads giveaway. Then, list the book for 99 cents for two weeks for introductory. Try to list it on free ebook websites to further your reach and fan base. If fans love your work there are more chances they'll not only follow you but purchase other books as well.


message 18: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Kaylee and Haru wrote some interesting comments.

Thanks for the added input, Kaylee and Haru. I am going to do more research while I continue to (disappointingly slowly) build my social media numbers.

Another option I've been considering for funding has been to identify and approach simpatico philanthropists. Not sure how that might work, or what the results would be. Just an idea for now.


message 19: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Mark wrote: "Kaylee and Haru wrote some interesting comments.

Thanks for the added input, Kaylee and Haru. I am going to do more research while I continue to (disappointingly slowly) build my social media numb..."


Depending upon your book genre, that may work? I think building social media numbers will be key for awhile.


message 20: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 779 comments I feel like the if I used any of them and created a campaign it would go unnoticed and be uneventful.


message 21: by Adrian (last edited Aug 17, 2018 11:56AM) (new)

Morales Adrian | 2 comments Hello,

May I ask why such a hefty sum is required to publish a book? Even going the traditional route and employing a local printer should not cost this much. Is this for promotion then?


message 22: by Kaylee (new)

Kaylee Dolat | 91 comments Adrian wrote: "Hello,

May I ask why such a hefty sum is required to publish a book? Even going the traditional route and employing a local printer should not cost this much. Is this for promotion then?"


I think a lot of authors/aspiring authors don't take into account several things. Such as costs of cover art, editing, formatting (unless you do it yourself), marketing costs, ISBNs, and printing costs.

Even if you go the traditional route, in order to have stock of books to sell, you need to order them. Which, of course, can carry printing costs along with that. My publisher has me buy my copies up front (only a certain number are free for me a year) and then I pocket whatever I sell the book for.


message 23: by C.J. (new)

C.J. Shane (cjshane) | 20 comments Mark wrote: Would be happy to exchange ideas with anyone who comments now For my first novel (self-published), I used Indiegogo for crowdfunding. I received enough to pay for costs like proofreading, cover graphic design, book formatting for print and ebooks, a first order to sell books at a local book fair, etc. The people who donated were mostly from my email list, not social media. I think crowd funding is worth trying to help you get started. It's also worth the effort to find people who can do graphic design and proofreading/copying editing for a lower costs. I used Bookow.com for formatting and that was only $80 (print and ebooks both). Good luck


message 24: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments Adrian wrote: "I think a lot of authors/aspiring authors don't take into account several things. Such as costs of cover art, editing, formatting (unless you do it yourself), marketing costs, ISBNs, and printing costs.."

Bang on, Adrian. I am approaching self-publishing as a business, my novel as the carefully crafted product. Hence the editing, design and marketing costs will be higher than those of a casual hobbyist.


message 25: by Mark (new)

Mark D Swartz (markdswartz2) | 37 comments C.J. wrote: "For my first novel (self-published), I used Indiegogo for crowdfunding. I received enough to pay for costs like proofreading..."

Congrats on your success, C.J. May I ask how you achieved your crowdfunding goals?


message 26: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4306 comments Mod
No links. Thanks.


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