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World & Current Events > Robin Hood - bandit, legend or advocate for a social justice?

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message 1: by Nik (last edited Aug 11, 2018 01:06AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments This dude "is said to have robbed from the rich and given to the poor" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood
So, how do you assess his legacy: should it be praised or condemned? -:)


message 2: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments "Asses" :-)


message 3: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Thanks, edited to add another ass -:)


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments I don't think much is factual, but the story is good and I for one enjoyed reading about it when I was very young. So, getting young boys to read can't be bad.

When I was wandering around York once, I seem to recall seeing a sign where they say Robert Hod was hanged. That wasn't in any of the books I read, though.


message 5: by Graeme (last edited Aug 11, 2018 07:34PM) (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Robin hood wasn't hanged, his position was restored with the return of Richard the III, and the defeat of evil prince John and his vile henchman the Sheriff of Nottingham.

He lived happily ever after with Maid Marion, and the companionship of his merry men.

Surely this is indisputable....


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Nothing is indisputable, Graeme. Someone in York thinks otherwise, and was intent on spoiling the story. That person probably does not believe in the tooth fairy either :-(


message 7: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan You're kidding - no tooth fairy - I'm shocked.


message 8: by J.N. (new)

J.N. Bedout (jndebedout) | 104 comments I'm confident that "Robin Hood: Men in Tights" got it right.

#TomahawkChop


message 9: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan J.N. That's sacrilege. The Disney version was far better.


message 10: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) One comment on films Errol Flynn

Nottingham, Lincoln and York all seem to lay claim to to some part of the legend although facts are very thin on ground. Much like King Arthur with numerous castles and areas claiming ownership.

Does not stop them being good stories and basically anything can be added or taken away. I suspect though that the story origins are older and just adapted over time to fit the politics. i.e. King John was not as bad as history paints and Richard was not as good - after all he almost bankrupted the country with crusades and managed to get himself kidnapped or so legend has it.


message 11: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments From what I understand, Richard was hardly ever in England, which may be why he has such a good reputation - he didn't have time to irritate the English, and John got the "credit" for raising the taxes to pay for Richards overseas ventures.


message 12: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Since they don't have "H" in Russian, the guy is pronounced as "Robin Good". Kinda a different meaning


message 13: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Actually, King Richard III was a rather lousy monarch, according to real history. He didn't care one bit about his people and his only interest was to go fight in the Crusades. As said in an earlier post, he spent most of his life outside of England and he didn't even speak English: he spoke French! What did he do after ruining England by having his ransom paid? He went to France, then back to Palestine for more fighting. His only redeeming quality (if it can be one) was that everyone agreed that he was a brave, skilled warrior.


message 14: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments A tidbit here. Kevin Costner was probably the worst Robin Hood ever. His fake accent was terrible and inconsistent. At times, he sounded like a guy from Wisconsin. He ended up settling a lawsuit against the production company for hiding profits They probably felt justified, based on his performance.


message 15: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments How would a modern-day Robin Hood go about taking from the rich and giving to the poor?


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Probably an accountant who declared himself poor and swindled his clients, giving it to himself, being defined as poor :-)


message 17: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Found quite an anthology of the followers on the web:
http://www.kiwireport.com/real-life-r...
Don't know how accurate the list is, but read it with interest..


message 18: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Covered in film with this movie where they heist some gold and then (some reluctance) give it away. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120188/


message 19: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Scout wrote: "How would a modern-day Robin Hood go about taking from the rich and giving to the poor?"

How about using the Bernie Sanders' method: tax the rich and help the lower classes?


message 20: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Michel, Bernie would not qualify. Robin Hood was an outlaw; Bernie merely wanted to change the law. Now I know some of the greedy think tax is theft, but I disagree. What I would like to see is some of those greedy forced to live like the very poor for a while and see how they could cope. In my opinion, not very well.


message 21: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments I prefer to believe it's not large, but the actual per cent of outlaws among politicians will never be known, as only a small fraction thereof ever gets caught on bribery, abuse of power, fraud and other stuff. Not until crime/culpa scanner is invented? -:)


message 22: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Michel, I laughed out loud when I read your Bernie Sanders comment. Not for any political reason, but just because it was so unexpected. I needed a laugh.


message 23: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Nik, I'm totally against the development and use of a crime/culpa scanner. No way do I want to be held accountable for crimes committed when I was a young sprout, and which I got away with scot-free. Shoplifting, driving under the influence, trespassing on plantation land, fishing without a license. Haven't you guys been criminals at some point? Or maybe I've said too much :-)


message 24: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Scout, we all have old skelettons in our closets. However, some do have a lot more skelettons to hide than the average. Personally, there are certainly at least a couple of things I would have done differently if I could.


message 25: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments When I was young, drink/driving laws were different. The police had to have a reason to stop you, the thinking being if they couldn't see a reason you were probably driving safely. I can recall driving home and being particularly careful not to exceed the speed limit and not to have a light bulb gone :-) I have avoided crimes, although questionable fishing (i.e. no licence) could be held against me. But there were other things that were not crimes, or illegal, or faulty in any way that I still wish I could change because it was not doing something that turned out to possibly be a contributor to something else bad that happened much later, that had nothing to do with me.


message 26: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Maybe a good moment to remind that you probably have a privilege of not self-incriminating. It's an open internet, so don't be surprised to see a fish inspector at your gate one day -:)
If the original Robin's accomplices are here, maybe you can share memories the limitation period on punishability had probably expired after a few centuries


message 27: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Nik, I am gambling that a trout I caught without a licence at the age of ten or thereabouts has probably gone past the statute of limitations. And none of you know when and where :-)


message 28: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Come on, Nik. Surely you committed some minor crime in your youth.


message 29: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Talking of crimes, here is an extract I remember from a French historical TV theater play titled 'Les Rois Maudits' (The Damned Kings), telling about the curse put on French King Philippe V Le Bel by the head of the Knights Templar as the latter was being burned alive at the stake. One of the main characters of the play was the Count Robert d'Artois, an unscrupulous and ambitious but quite savory character. Early in the story, he travelled by boat to England to bring a message to his cousin, who was Queen of England, and was describing his sea trip in the following words:
- The sea was so rough and the boat so shaky that I feared that I was going to drown, so I started to confess my crimes. Thankfully, the storm abated and I was left with enough crimes to confess for the return trip to France.


message 30: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Scout wrote: "Come on, Nik. Surely you committed some minor crime in your youth."

Participated in student protests almost quarter a century ago -:)


message 31: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments If we are going into that sort of event, fifty years ago at the end of this week, I did some illegal driving, interference in a military exercise, various protests and ended up in my only smuggling operation. Details on my Thursday blog post, to mark the anniversary. (Previously announced blog post on evidence will be delayed by a week).


message 32: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Ian wrote: "my only smuggling operation.."

Spoiler alert!
(From Czechoslovakia to London?)


message 33: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Actually, the blog post has grown so I shall have to split it in two. What an alert spoiler, but not exactly.


message 34: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments I read part 1, ending in a cliffhanger. Looking forward to part 2. Can you believe it was 50 years ago?


message 35: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Maybe you should put the link here for those who don't have it.


message 36: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments It is supposedly on Goodreads, but if not:
https://wordpress.com/post/ianmillerb...


message 37: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Thanks.


message 38: by Nik (last edited Apr 13, 2021 01:25AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments So, if catapulted into modern times, would Robin spearhead BLM, succeed Bernie as the progressive leader, ambush and extort Forbes's list, join conservatives to advocate for gun rights, or maybe retire hopeless to an Australian outback to set up a dingo farm? :)
What do you think?


message 39: by Marie (new)

Marie | 569 comments Nik wrote: "So, if catapulted into modern times, would Robin spearhead BLM, succeed Bernie as the progressive leader, ambush and extort Forbes's list, join conservatives to advocate for gun rights, or maybe retire hopeless to an Australian outback to set up a dingo farm? :)
What do you think?..."


Well I think I will a tiny input in here. :) I don't know about the dingo farm - lol.

A modern day Robin Hood? I don't know about stealing from the rich to feed the poor but I do know that there should be some kind of organization in place to get the poor and homeless off the streets. There is so much of that over here in America that it would be nice to see someone or some type of good samaritan group do something to help the poor people.

I don't know if Robin Hood would have made it in these times but who knows as there is lots of crime everywhere so maybe he would just blend in with the masses. At least he would do some good for humanity as anything would be better than nothing.


message 40: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Marie wrote: "....I don't know if Robin Hood would have made it in these times but who knows as there is lots of crime everywhere so maybe he would just blend in with the masses. At least he would do some good for humanity as anything would be better than nothing...."

Yeah, Mr Hood would just need to update his skills a little, there are plenty of opportunities to apply them to


message 41: by Marie (new)

Marie | 569 comments Nik wrote: "Marie wrote: "....I don't know if Robin Hood would have made it in these times but who knows as there is lots of crime everywhere so maybe he would just blend in with the masses. At least he would ..."

Mr. Hood?! (chuckle)


message 42: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments I sometimes feel like retiring to a dingo farm, but Robin Hood? He'd be siphoning money from offshore accounts and giving it to non-profits.


message 43: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) Scout wrote: "I sometimes feel like retiring to a dingo farm, but Robin Hood? He'd be siphoning money from offshore accounts and giving it to non-profits."

Only after taking his cut after all he had all the merry men and Marion to take care of


message 44: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Thanks for the smile :-)


message 45: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Right now, Mr Hood would probably be arrested, e.g. for riding a horse through Nottingham without a permit, or driving something without a licence. If his robbing the rich relied on stealing from them as they went through Sherwood forest, he would have very slim pickings. Also, hiding would be more difficult. Sherwood Forest has shrunk to something like 1,000 acres, I believe. Mr Hood would have to resort to being a merchant banker to fleece all and sundry.


message 46: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments Right. Poor Robin. Are there truly any Robin Hoods today?


message 47: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13528 comments Scout wrote: "Right. Poor Robin. Are there truly any Robin Hoods today?"

Googled "modern robin hoods" and that's the first entry it returned with: https://www.themodernrogue.com/articl... :)
I've no idea whether it's true or accurate


message 48: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 1629 comments I like the one where a group took construction materials from a luxury building in Manhattan and gave them to people needing help after Hurricane Sandy. At lest one of these is in line with the article Nik posted.
https://curiousmatic.com/6-modern-day...

I am curious as to what we all think of this one - hackers using ransomware to extort money from businesses that can affort it, which they they donate to charity.
https://en.cryptonomist.ch/2020/10/20...


message 49: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9531 comments Lizzie wrote: "I like the one where a group took construction materials from a luxury building in Manhattan and gave them to people needing help after Hurricane Sandy. At lest one of these is in line with the art..."

As a real weird one, an acquaintance of mine in the US had his identity stolen, I think $10,000 was stolen, and it was used to buy bibles!


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