The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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General Chat > True Crime

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message 1: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca WOndering if folks consider "true crime" books as mystery/detective fiction. IN particular thinking of the graphic novel about Jeffrey Dahmer's early years. Thinking of including it in a course on Mystery and Detective fiction...might be a stretch though, but it is such a good book.


message 2: by Lena (new)

Lena | 101 comments I think many would and anything that gets students interested is good. I don’t because I have a pretty firm line between non fiction and everything else.


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 232 comments I'd consider true crime a related area, usually separate as there's the fact / fiction dichotomy, but it also depends how it's written. F'rinstance, I'm not generally a massive true crime fan, but I do a few books such as In Cold Blood and The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America as they read very much like novels.



At some level it's the old debate about whether genres are a real thing or just marketing, but with fact and fiction, as Lena says above, I think we need to maintain a line between the fact and fiction.


message 4: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I'm teaching a "literature" class...which I would argue covers both fiction and nonfiction. Also considering In Cold Blood, especially since it was so groundbreaking, and I could use the movie in connection with it as well.


message 5: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 232 comments Rebecca wrote: "I'm teaching a "literature" class...which I would argue covers both fiction and nonfiction. Also considering In Cold Blood, especially since it was so groundbreaking, and I could use the movie in c..."


I agree on both counts; literature should cover anything written, and In cold Blood is an excellent teaching tool, along with a super book.


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