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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > Do you dream when you sleep?

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message 1: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments I just read that dreaming helps us work out things that have happened during the day, and if you don't dream, you may become anxious and depressed. Do you dream? I read something about Einstein having a dream that inspired his theory of relativity. Do you think dreams have meanings we can decipher? Is there a particularly vivid dream you've had?


message 2: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Hi Scout, another excellent question.

I dream every night, vividly, but mostly in grey scale, i.e. no color, like high-definition black and white TV.

Occasionally, I'll have a full color dream, which is very-rarely lucid.

Dreams worth remembering include, the following elements in no particular order.

Flight, and or 'almost,' weightlessness.
Labyrinths, especially ones that move and close in.
Vampires.
Conflict.
and, being lost, or trying to find something, in a complex world that is indifferent to my efforts.

Most of the people in my dreams, are completely made up, very rarely, people I know will show up in my dreams.


message 3: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13767 comments Don't know about Einstein, but Mendeleev "... claimed to have to have envisioned the complete arrangement of the elements in a dream", i.e. - The Periodic Table https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitri_...

I probably dream every night, but remember myself dreaming maybe once in every 3-4 nights..


message 4: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I dream every night, quite vividly. Sadly, Tuesday night's dream encompassed a whole weekend, so I woke up thinking it was Monday all over again! I was very happy to discover it was actually Wednesday. 🤣🤣🤣


message 5: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin I believe that dreaming is a standard feature of Human sleep. In fact, in the TV series 'Star Trek, The Next Generation', there was an episode made about the problems created by the crew being unable (for a reason I don't remember) to dream, leaving them tired and depressed.


message 6: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments Leonie, great outcome. You cheered yourself up :-)


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments Graeme, I've never had that flying dream people talk about, but I'd like to. I did have a bad dream after I went up in a glider and then let my son go up. Afterwards, in a dream, I watched helplessly as the glider with my son crashed. Some message there about how terrifying it is to let your child go out into the world where you have no control. Still, he had a great time.

At a time in my life when I felt helpless, I had a labyrinth-type dream. I walked into an old house with a long hallway that had many doors. Every door I opened revealed a room with no exit. One room had a window, but when I looked out, there was a nest of rattlesnakes below. I walked to the end of the hall, where there was a curtain. I pushed it aside, and there was a mad doctor operating on someone. Probably me.


message 8: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments Here's a question. Have you ever had a problem on your mind, maybe how to work out some element of plot in your novel, or some problem in your life, and slept on it - only to awaken the next day to have some new insight?


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9745 comments Scout wrote: "Here's a question. Have you ever had a problem on your mind, maybe how to work out some element of plot in your novel, or some problem in your life, and slept on it - only to awaken the next day to..."

I have also composed music, and I have dreamt of something that, in the dream, seemed fantastic. I woke up, put it on paper as best I could, but when I went to play it next day it was rubbish - very bland. I don't know whether that was the useless dream or whether it faded and went bland as I awoke.


message 10: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Scout wrote: "Here's a question. Have you ever had a problem on your mind, maybe how to work out some element of plot in your novel, or some problem in your life, and slept on it - only to awaken the next day to..."

What I hate is the situation where your on the verge of sleep and your limbs have locked down and feel like they're made of lead, and you get a brilliant idea for whatever story you're working on and you have to wake yourself up to record it.

The wish that , "Surely I'll remember this in the morning," never, ever works.


message 11: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13767 comments Graeme wrote: "The wish that , "Surely I'll remember this in the morning," never, ever works...."

Maybe a biz opportunity for a 'dream recorder'? -:)


message 12: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments That would be cool. I wake up sometimes and can recall parts of my dream but in a couple of minutes the whole thing is gone And, like Graeme, most of the people in my dreams are not ones I know.

Serendipitously (see thread about coincidences), I ran across an article yesterday in Readers Digest (I buy it for my mom) about people who had meaningful dreams: "Yesterday" came to Paul McCartney in a dream; Dmitri Mendeleev dreamed the Periodic Table of Elements; Elias Howe was inspired by a dream to create the sewing machine needle; Mary Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein; Jack Nicklaus dreamed about the perfect swing; Coleridge was inspired to write "Kubla Khan"; Keith Richards dreamed the first verse of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction." What do you think?


message 13: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Scout wrote: "What do you think? ."

Perfectly reasonable, sometimes dreams turn up gems.


message 14: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin Or they turn into nightmares!


message 15: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments I gave examples of dreams people had that guided them creatively. Are you saying that some people have dreams that motivate them to do bad things? I haven't found evidence of that, but it could be true.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13767 comments I often find it useful to 'sleep' on something rather than make decisions under a spur of the moment. The night pause does usually contributes to an orderly perception and YES dreams or borderline dormant thinking do give some creative ideas.
Still thinking about beds with inbuilt dream recorder -:)


message 17: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments Nik, you always come up with these ingenious inventions.

This isn't an invention, but a discovery I made way before I read about it many years later. When I was in college, I discovered that if I crammed all night for an exam and didn't go to sleep, I didn't do so well. But if I crammed and slept for a couple of hours, I did well. I knew, way before it was generally known, that sleep plays a role in learning.

And I do believe that if you think about a problem before you go to sleep, you may wake up with an answer to the problem.


message 18: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13767 comments Yes, my experience coincides with yours - that our brain processors need a sleep break to absorb better the input and perform rejuvenated the morning after.
As an opposite example, taking an exam being hungover, isn't something I'd recommend.


message 19: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments When we consider that we spend one third of our life sleeping, we have to hope that the time is well spent.


message 20: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9745 comments It is well spent if you consider what you feel like if you don't.


message 21: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2151 comments The problem is when you're headed toward sleep, you're loosening your mind and opening it up, making it easier for ideas to flow than when you're awake and trying to force them to come out. That's why all the good ideas seem to come when you're about to fall asleep. It's the same reason a lot of artists work best when their on drugs, because the drugs open the mind to random and free thought.


message 22: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5516 comments Are you thinking that some drugs may induce a state that mimics REM sleep, the stage in which you dream? That's an interesting thought.


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