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Le Médecin Malgré Lui
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Buddy Reads > Le Médecin malgré lui - Buddy read

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message 1: by Pink (last edited Aug 07, 2018 11:32PM) (new)

Pink | 6556 comments This is our buddy read thread for Le Médecin Malgré Lui by Molière

Newly, Luffy and Eileen are reading this in French, during August 2018. Feel free to join in!


message 2: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Thank you, Pink! I'm going to read this in two days.


message 3: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Just read the first act. It reminds me of L'avare, by Moliere himself. I recognized some words as being corrupted by the writer, to make Snaganarelle seem coarse. I won't be reviewing this book o Goodreads, because I didn't find any merit in it. Moliere is des années lumières away from writers like Oscar Wilde and Shakespeare.

Still, the play is a representation of the classical period We can understand the mores of the time through the story. No vulgarity, no violence per se (by that I mean no murder committed on the scene).


Eileen | 19 comments I finished it and thought the redeeming and comedic parts were the doctor's ridiculous medical diagnoses and recommended treatments. I am moving on to try his play The Misanthrope but will check back for further discussion.


Eileen | 19 comments This was my favorite recommended medical treatment and one that I wished worked in real life! (view spoiler)


message 6: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Eileen wrote: "I finished it and thought the redeeming and comedic parts were the doctor's ridiculous medical diagnoses and recommended treatments. I am moving on to try his play The Misanthrope but..."

I would've rated it the same as you. I finished the book hours away. It's a head-scratching play.


message 7: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments hey guys or bonjour y All. je commence Act 1.


message 8: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments real quick question is there a french version of iambic pantameter?


message 9: by Eileen (last edited Aug 08, 2018 10:14AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Eileen | 19 comments Bonjour, et je ne suis pas sûre. Alexandrine, peut-être?


message 10: by Luffy (last edited Aug 08, 2018 10:11AM) (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Newly wrote: "real quick question is there a french version of iambic pantameter?"

Don't know, but there must be. Google said Pentamètre iambique.


Eileen | 19 comments Oh, maybe you meant translation of the words themselves versus similarly common poetry structure.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments An Alexandrine has 12 poetic feet and was used generally in tragedies, especially Racine and Corneille.


message 13: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "An Alexandrine has 12 poetic feet and was used generally in tragedies, especially Racine and Corneille."

I think it's called an Alexandrin. But I'm not sure.


Eileen | 19 comments Luffy wrote: "

Yes, I thought the play was just ok but I'm glad I read it. I like French literature and had not gotten to this one yet. I would have enjoyed it more had the lead-up premise for Snaganarelle acting like a doctor been different.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments Moliere played the role of Snagnarellle(?) I am sure it would have been funny seeing him on stage.


message 16: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Moliere played the role of Snagnarellle(?) I am sure it would have been funny seeing him on stage."

I didn't know that.


message 17: by Eileen (last edited Aug 08, 2018 10:56AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Eileen | 19 comments I believe he did, Rosemarie. Apparently medical professionals weren't too happy with his work!


Rosemarie | 1556 comments Of course, back then, the doctors killed more people than they cured. You were better off trusting to nature or to peasant remedies.
Moliere really did not care for the medical profession.


Eileen | 19 comments The play did make me think of how the practice of medicine and patient knowledge was much less advanced and, with the comedy aside, it certainly illustrates how patients could be more vulnerable.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments Not only that, the people of the time thought that fresh air was bad for you so the windows were sealed shut.


message 21: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments okay so domestic violence is not funny but this first act is hilarious. from what I can gather. these two ppl have been married a while and they are poor. some of the reason is because he is an alcoholic who drinks all the money. Martine the wife is nagging at him and she is winning the argument. how am I doing?


Valerie (nicehotcupoftea) | 46 comments I've read the first act, and watched act 1 of a YouTube play, and the banter between husband and wife is really funny. It seems to me that she is taking a slow act of revenge on him by telling people that he is a doctor with a great track record of cures (which of course he isn't). There are many old words and expressions that I don't know.


message 23: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments I'm through the second act. And I think I'm following the story alright. It's slow going but I'm really enjoying it. Moliere was throwing shade at the medical professionals of his age. Love it.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I finished 4 scenes and think that Martine has an ingenious plan for getting even with her husband for beating her.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I have just finished two acts and would love to see this on stage. It is a very visual play. I can just imagine S's costume as the doctor.
Jacqueline makes a lot of sense when she states the cure for the young woman's loss of voice-a husband of her choice.


message 26: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I have just finished two acts and would love to see this on stage. It is a very visual play. I can just imagine S's costume as the doctor.
Jacqueline makes a lot of sense when she states the cure f..."


i'm glad you're liking it. I was assigned L'avare on my courses recently. Moliere is easy to get into unlike Victor Hugo.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments One of my favourites is L'École des Femmes.


message 28: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "One of my favourites is L'École des Femmes."

Never heard of it. You must be fluent in French.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I took a course in 17th century French literature in university so we read a lot of Moliere, Racine and Corneille.
It is a very sweet and funny play, more "refined"than Le Medecin malgre lui.


message 30: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments I didn't go to University. My biggest regret.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments This is a great group to get an education in classic literature while having fun.
I went to university in the 70s, when tuition was much much lower than it is now.
As an added bonus, I met my husband in university.


message 32: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "As an added bonus, I met my husband in university...."

I love life stories like that. So romantic! If you want something french to buddy read(especially novels) PM me.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I just finished the play. It was a fun read.


message 34: by Luffy (new)

Luffy (monkey-d-luffy) | 75 comments Rosemarie wrote: "I just finished the play. It was a fun read."

I concur, but it's now a blur in my mind. I'm beginning to forget about it.


Rosemarie | 1556 comments It was pure entertainment, I think.


message 36: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments This is a perfect example of the classical french farce. It's highly improbable over the top and makes no maneuvers to teach a lesson. This is an over the top incredible play that give or take a couple plot points aged exceptionally well. It is over 200 years old and its still hilarious. Moliere is truly a one of a kind humorist. I will say that he is funnier that Shakespeare and Wilde. I'd dont think that very many of today's comedic minds will age half as well. His is not trying to teach or shape your opinion, this is strictly entertainment. Its raunchy without being perverse and cheeky without vulgarity. Not to say that there is no vulgarity, oh its there but it's funny. Moliere crosses the line in the way that truly great humorist can.


Valerie (nicehotcupoftea) | 46 comments I just finished the play, and was quite surprised that it was so accessible, and it really has a timeless humour.


Eileen | 19 comments Glad you enjoyed it, Newly, and thanks for suggesting it. I did enjoy the comedic satirical elements relative 17th-Century French medicine. If you and others would like to discuss other plays or other French Classics, I'd be interested in joining in when I can.


Eileen | 19 comments Rosemarie wrote: "One of my favourites is L'École des Femmes."

Rosemarie, I'm going to read that one based on your suggestion. :)


Rosemarie | 1556 comments I hope you like it. ☺️


message 41: by Newly (new)

Newly Wardell | 180 comments thanks so much you guys. I'm going to read l e cole des f emmes this Sept. thanks for the suggestion Eileen


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The Misanthrope (other topics)
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