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F2F Book Discussions > F2F80: August 2018 | Mystery

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message 1: by Elaine (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 226 comments Hello fellow readers! I'm Elaine, this month's moderator. I hope everyone is enjoying reading their preferred books with our current discussion format.

Put on your thinking caps, friends because we will be discussing Mystery novels for the month of August. I will be posting a question or two about our topic every week. Any novel categorized by Goodreads as mystery is ok. I'm not very picky and won't judge you for your literary taste. Promise!

Week 1 Questions
1. What book will you be reading this month? Why?
2. Do you often read mystery novels? Any favorite authors/novels you would like to suggest?


message 2: by Monique (last edited Aug 05, 2018 07:52PM) (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Week 1 Questions

1. I will be reading Agatha Christie's (finally!) "And Then There Were None." And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

If I finish that quickly maybe I'll read another Christie, or Tana French's "The Likeness."

2. I don't often read mystery novels but I love them when I get the chance to. Because they're plot-driven, I always find that I can't stop reading until I solve the mystery! Hehe.

My favorite mystery novels are Stieg Larsson's The Millennium Trilogy. LOVE Lisbeth Salander. Super kickass.


message 3: by Monagin (last edited Aug 05, 2018 09:25PM) (new)

Monagin (mdets) Yehey! My favorite genre!

Hi everyone, Monagin here.
1. I will be reading and rereading (yes, I enjoy rereading a whole awful lot) Sherlock Holmes stories. I have the whole set but haven’t really finished it because life got in the way, so I’m going to start from scratch.
2. That said, I enjoy mystery novels so much. But, I only ever liked reading mystery novels after having watched an episode of Detective Conan that stuck with me through the years. Started reading books in the genre at around 12 or 13 y.o? I found out that Detective Conan was loosely based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself and so there ...

Recommendations:
Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Franklin Dixon, Carolyn Keene

Also... do you consider suspense as mystery?

Have a good and blessed day y’all!


message 4: by Maria Ella (new)

Maria Ella (mariaellabetos) | 1351 comments Hello~

Finally this month, I am not re-reading lols. I am planning to get this done. Keigo Higashino's Journey Under the Midnight Sun.
Journey Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino

I am not into mystery novel per se, but I enjoy a slowburn prose. Perhaps this is a first for me to actually enjoy a mystery novel --- because of Higashino's writing technique. Mystery novels are those filled with action, and it kinds of tires me out (tried Maltese Falcon before and I went bleh lols).

So nah, I am not an actual fan of mystery novels heeee


message 5: by Maria (new)

Maria (mariasm) | 2440 comments My first love genre!

1. I will probably read one of the following:

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
Mystic River by Dennis Lehane
The Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsythe
The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy
Intensity by Dean Koontz
Consent to Kill by Vincent Flynn

2. Books of Gillian Flynn, Stiegg Larsson, John Le Carre

Nancy Drew got me started into reading, so this is my default genre.


message 6: by Lik (new)

Lik C | 16 comments I'll read Nancy Drew #44 The Clue in the Crossword Cipher. Nancy Drew also got me started into reading, but it has been years since I read one myself.

I seldom read mystery novels now. I only read them when friends or family recommend to me. I'd love to read a good mystery again.

My favorite mystery novels are Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly and The Testament by John Grisham.


message 7: by Earnest (new)

Earnest | 12 comments Week 1 Questions
1.
I'll read Out by Natsuo Kirino Out by Natsuo Kirino
Or if that's too long for me to finish then maybe The Good Husband of Zebra Drive (No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, #8) by Alexander McCall Smith The Good Husband of Zebra Drive by Alexander McCall Smith

2.
I'm not much of a mystery reader so I can only suggest obvious books like those of Agatha Christie or Sherlock Holmes. Though there are a lot of novels that have a mystery aspect to them even if they are not categorized as such.


message 8: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Week 1 Questions

1. Will be reading Sherlock Holmes, will start with A Study in Scarlet and we'll see how many stories I can finish within the month. Heee. Why? Because I don't even know why I haven't read at least some it yet.
2. I can only think of Stieg Larsson right now, the Millennium trilogy is superb!


message 9: by Aaron Vincent (new)

Aaron Vincent (aaronvincent) | 2053 comments Week 1 Questions

1. I'm reading Tana French's The Secret Place. I've read some reviews of her books from few of our members. These reviews claim that they lost sleep over it. It's been a while since I lost sleep because of a book. I'd like to revisit that experience.

2. I'm not really into mystery novels because I find the usual tropes so tiring: the macguffin, the lead detective brimming with machismo, the damsel in distress, etc. I would love to read something that subverts those usual genre tropes.

Although the details of the story already escapes me, I remember being completely sucked into the mystery of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None. It's one of my favorite experience while reading a mystery novel.


message 10: by Veronica (last edited Aug 06, 2018 02:42AM) (new)

Veronica | 734 comments Week 1 Questions
1. I'm currently reading Dissolution by C.J. Sansom and really enjoying it. Murder mystery combined with historical fiction is really right up my alley. The protagonist was commissioned by Thomas Cromwell to investigate a murder in a monastery. It's keeping me happy while I patiently wait for the third book of Hilary Mantel's Cromwell trilogy. :)

2. Whodunits are a favorite genre of mine. I grew up reading Agatha Christie. Maybe that's why I usually prefer Golden Age mystery novels/writers. Here are some of my favorites:
- The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey
- The Moving Toyshop by Edmund Crispin
- Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers
- A Fatal Inversion by Barbara Vine aka Ruth Rendell (not really Golden Age but very good)


message 11: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 10 comments Week 1 Questions
1. What book will you be reading this month? Why?

I am currently reading Dan Brown's Inferno Inferno (Robert Langdon, #4) by Dan Brown I picked this book because 1) I haven't read it since I bought it years ago. 2) I enjoy following Robert Langdon's adventure. 3) I've always wanted to go to Italy 4) I get to learn about art history and coded messages.

2. Do you often read mystery novels? Any favorite authors/novels you would like to suggest?

Not as often as I used to. I used to read A Jigsaw Jones when I was in primary school and Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes series when I turned 11 because of the anime Detective Conan, same with Monagin. It's a fun and captivating genre. Without further ado, here are my my favorite mystery authors:


1) Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes series
2) Dan Brown 's Robert Langdon series
3)Robert Galbraith a.k.a J.K. Rowling Cormoran Strike series

--woah. I didn't realize that all the mystery novels that I've been reading are serialized.


message 12: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 10 comments Monagin wrote: "Yehey! My favorite genre!

Hi everyone, Monagin here.
1. I will be reading and rereading (yes, I enjoy rereading a whole awful lot) Sherlock Holmes stories. I have the whole set but haven’t reall..."


We're totally the same Monagin!!! I used to just passed by the Sherlock Holmes series in the library but because of Detective Conan, I started reading it. I don't own a single book yet though.


message 13: by Monagin (new)

Monagin (mdets) Hi Rain!

Yes! Me too! Hahah. If you like the Robert Langdon series, I’d bet you’d like Origin. I think it’s Dan Brown newest book. I’m currently listening to it myself. So far so good.


message 14: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 10 comments Hello! I think so too. Thanks for the recommendation. It's actually part of my want-to-read list.


message 15: by Maria Ella (new)

Maria Ella (mariaellabetos) | 1351 comments On a side note, Ronnie, what are Golden Age Mystery writers? Is this a legit period way back when? Lol, first time I am hearing it. Siguro kasi I was not really a fan of Agatha Christie.

For those who read Agatha Christie:
Does Agatha's writing make you feel creepy? Mystery bordering horror ba sya? (Like Saw the first movie?)

Higashino, the author I read a book with, is like Stieg Larsson daw. Looking forward to your side if you have read these works rin. I want to compare notes hahaha


message 16: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Maria Ella wrote: "For those who read Agatha Christie:
Does Agatha's writing make you feel creepy? Mystery bordering horror ba sya? (Like Saw the first movie?)"


I only read "And Then There Were None" but it's not creepy at all! It's just straightforward writing, bordering on juvenile nga for me. But I think it has endured and is now a classic because wow talaga, the mystery. She will confound you until you read the last page.


message 17: by Monagin (new)

Monagin (mdets) My first Agatha Christie was “Murder in the Orient Express” and I didn’t think too much of it until I reread in my teens. I agree. Borderline horror na nga siya para sa akin. I still find it fascinating though. Ewan ko ba, naeenganyo kasi ako sa inner trappings (rowtsbaki) of the mind natin e. Murder in the Orient Express showed me just how far anyone would go for their own selfish ‘feelings’ and satisfaction. It’s no wonder why Agatha Christie sells second only to the Bible. She weaves stories in a way that’s both gruesome yet also strangely fascinating.

What about you guys?


message 18: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 1 Questions
1. What book will you be reading this month? Why?

>I meant to finish Twelve by Jennifer Lynn Barnes;
Then, The 17th Suspect by James Patterson;
And if time will allow it, I should really finish the gargantuan Broken Harbor by Tana French.

2. Do you often read mystery novels? Any favorite authors/novels you would like to suggest?

>Yes. For some reason, I like the stories behind bloody murders.
James Patterson - he's a staple,
C.S. Harris - simply love her well-researched Victorian mysteries.
Joanne Fluke - my regular dose of candy. Although, I've never seen the TV movie based on the books.
Ariana Franklin - I hate that she died before she finished her Mistress of the Art of Death series, but she will remain a favorite.
Amanda Stevens - nobody scared me off my bed like she did.


message 19: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Maria Ella wrote: "Higashino, the author I read a book with, is like Stieg Larsson daw. Looking forward to your side if you have read these works rin. I want to compare notes hahaha "

I've read from both authors, and no, I never had a hint that they are alike. If I venture to compare, Keigo Higashino is more like Guillermo Martínez.


message 20: by Bennard (new)

Bennard | 730 comments Week 1 Questions
1. What book will you be reading this month? Why?

- I'm currently reading Jonathan Lethem's The Feral Detective. If I had the time and the inclination, I might also read The Blackbirder by Dorothy B. Hughes and All The Conspirators by Carlos Bulosan.

2. Do you often read mystery novels? Any favorite authors/novels you would like to suggest?

- I read mystery novels every now and then. It's one of my favorite genres though I'm very picky with the mystery novels I read. I would really recommend the works of Dorothy B. Hughes. I believe that she's way ahead of her time and she has written mystery novels with sociopolitical bite. If the world were a just place, we'd be considering Hughes as the master of noir instead of Chandler or Hammett.


message 21: by Elaine (last edited Aug 09, 2018 12:00AM) (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 226 comments Monique: We read the same book. I found it a quick read. Hoping to hear more of your other mystery reads in the following weeks if you ever finish more.

Monagin: Yay! It's good to hear that we're taking up your favorite genre. See you on the month end for our F2F, yes? :D

Maria Ella: I wish you're enjoying your current mystery read (base sa tweets mo, hahaha, nacurious ako bigla). Will this book/author make you a fan of mystery novels? Hmmm... I have only read And Then There Were None by Christie and I do not see it bordering on horror. It's more like a catch-me-if-you-can thing for me. Maybe on her other novels? I'm planning to read Murder on the Orient Express and will try to see. :)

Maria: Read one lang? Read all na! Hehe

Lik: Hi Lik!!! It was nice meeting you last F2F! I hope it won't be the last time you attend. (Secretly hoping umattend ka ulit for my discussion para madami, masaya). I also love Nancy Drew, and the Hardy Boys. They're my first mystery reads when I was in grade school.

Earnest: Curious and out of topic question, did you finish The Idiot? Please enlighten us on the next F2F. :P

Mawi: Happy birth month!!! Yay! I'm also reading Sherlock Holmes because surprisingly, I also haven't read this. Do you also have the 2-volume copy? Hehe.

Aaron Vincent: Ooohh. I hope the book is as good as they claim it to be and that it's not written in the usual mystery tropes. Eyebags not sore eyes on the next F2F? :P

Veronica: That sounds interesting. I like whodunit novels (even if I have only ever read intermediate books) because they're very plot-driven. :)

Rain: Hi Rain! It was nice meeting you last F2F! I hope to see you on the month end too. Hehe. I haven't read Inferno yet but I have read Da Vinci's Code. I liked it when he incorporated art history and art-inspired theories in his mysteries because it's something I can relate with. History of arts is l-o-v-e but not enough for me to follow through on Langdon's subsequesnt adventures.

Louize: Wow!! So many books on the list. I wish I have enough time and energy to down so many reads in a month now. Huhu. Haallooo and hugs all the way to Saskatchewan! We miss you!

Bennard wrote: I know you're a very picky reader and so, I will be putting Dorothy Hughes on my list since you recommended it. Let's see if it would make me appreciate noir more than Hammett did. Hehe.


message 22: by Elaine (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 226 comments How are you guys holding up with your reading? I'm crossing my fingers that you're enjoying your reads.


Week 2 Questions:
1. Mystery is divided into subgenres. Which subgenre does the novel(s) you're reading belong to? Which subgenre do you fancy/read more often? Why?
2. Mystery vs Thriller vs Suspense. What do you think differentiates the three?


message 23: by Maria Ella (new)

Maria Ella (mariaellabetos) | 1351 comments Elaine wrote: "1. Mystery is divided into subgenres. Which subgenre does the novel(s) yo..."

I don't want to answer this yet because all the while I thought they are one and the same goodness why so many genres T_T


message 24: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 10 comments Elaine wrote: "Monique: We read the same book. I found it a quick read. Hoping to hear more of your other mystery reads in the following weeks if you ever finish more.

Monagin: Yay! It's good to hear that we're ..."



Hello Elaine! It was nice meeting you too last F2F! I can't wait to meet you all again on this month's F2F. Actually, I have only read Angels and Demons and, currently this one. I unintentionally skipped it because I found this book first at the Manila International Book Fair but none of the 2nd & 3rd namely, The Da Vinci Code The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2) by Dan Brown and The Lost Symbol The Lost Symbol (Robert Langdon, #3) by Dan Brown . Right? Mystery + History of Art = awesome adventure.


message 25: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Week 2 Questions:
1. Mystery is divided into subgenres. Which subgenre does the novel(s) you're reading belong to? Which subgenre do you fancy/read more often? Why?
Agatha Christie is like the "mother" of mystery writers and her works are a canon by themselves. From those subgenres, her mystery stories are under "Classic." I don't fancy a mystery subgenre. Probably because as long as it's a "mystery" they're all the same to me!

2. Mystery vs Thriller vs Suspense. What do you think differentiates the three?
I'm no expert but I think that there's a very thin line separating those three genres. A mystery will always have that air of suspense in it, and thrillers and/or suspense books will more likely than not have a mystery within it that must be solved. So honestly... I don't know how to differentiate them. Haha.


message 26: by Monagin (last edited Aug 14, 2018 02:39AM) (new)

Monagin (mdets) Monique wrote: "Week 2 Questions:
1. Mystery is divided into subgenres. Which subgenre does the novel(s) you're reading belong to? Which subgenre do you fancy/read more often? Why?
Agatha Christie is like the "mot..."


1. Sherlock Holmes' stories, I'd say, are mystery novels.

2. I always thought of it this way:
Mystery - The reader does not know something the author does. (Like a whodunnit novel). I thought of it this way since I see most books labeled as "mystery-thrillers"; meaning once they finally find out who it is, they are now in the thrill of chase.

Thriller - Here, the story centers mostly on the protagonist's battle with evil. This is the genre I usually describe my detective novels (e.g. Catherine Coulter books) I wouldn't really say Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew are 'pure' thrillers though, since they also do not know who the culprit is. Usually too, the hero is already in danger from the beginning.

Suspense - There's a lot of action involved. Quite simple definition, for me. Hehe. IDK about this one, mostly. I know Mary Higgins Clark is termed the Queen of Suspense and I generally based my assumption of the genre from her works. Since, often times, the reader knows something bad is about to happen to the protagonist.

I'm always torn when I describe my books to friends. They see it as suspense yet I see it as mystery/thriller. Hahah!


message 27: by KaZaam (last edited Aug 16, 2018 02:08AM) (new)

KaZaam | 151 comments Week 1 Questions
(view spoiler)
Week 2 Questions:
(view spoiler)


message 28: by Jinkay (new)

Jinkay  (kayjin) | 7 comments Week 1 Questions
1. What book will you be reading this month? Why?
I've recently finished Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty .
I am currently reading Out by Natsuo Kirino . I am amazed how Japanese authors make amazing mystery novels.

2. Do you often read mystery novels? Any favorite authors/novels you would like to suggest?
Yes, I do. It's my favorite genre. I recommend Penance by Kanae Minato and Confessions by Kanae Minato both by Kanae Minato. She is an awesome multiple POV mystery writer.

Week 2 Questions:
1. Mystery is divided into subgenres. Which subgenre does the novel(s) you're reading belong to? Which subgenre do you fancy/read more often? Why?
I'm sorry I am not familiar with subgenres of mystery. Haha.

2. Mystery vs Thriller vs Suspense. What do you think differentiates the three?
Mystery - the reader doesn't know who died and why. It doesn't necessarily have to have some action as long as the reader is kept in breathless anticipation.
Thriller - there are some actions, most probably that the protagonist is in danger or in some kind of a chase. This will make the reader want to jump off their seat and take action as well.
Suspense - there must be some kind of action but the author must build the tension first. This will give the reader a feeling of being on the edge of their seats.
reply | flag *


message 29: by Elaine (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 226 comments Maria Ella + Monique: Unfortunately, genres have subgenres! Hahaha. Ang hirap na nga i-categorize pinahirapan pa nila tayo. Hehehe.

KaZaam:" Hi Kathy! Interesting reads. Maybe I'll put Tana French's books on my pile and see if I can finally figure out whodunnit. I'm not very good with that. Hehe.

Jinkay: Hi Jinkay! Welcome to TFG! I haven't read a mystery novel penned by a Japanese author yet. I would love to hear more about what you read (lists Natsuo Kirino and Kanae Minato on TBR pile). (^,^)//


message 30: by Elaine (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 226 comments Happy Monday! So sorry this mod was not able to post questions last week. Huhu. I'll combine Week 3 and 4 Questions instead.

Week 3/ 4 Questions
1. As you read along, pieces of evidence are revealed. Do you try to hypothesize the solution/who committed the crime? if yes, were you able to get it correctly? How effective was the author's use of plot twists and red herrings?

2. What do you think is the most important part of a mystery? Characterization, plot, setting, or problem/solution? How does your book rate in each of this areas?


P.S.: The event invite is up, hope you guys can RSVP and join our discussion on the weekend. I'm crossing my fingers that it won't rain cats and dogs this week. Stay safe and dry, everyone! :D


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