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Picture of the Day > August 2018

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message 1: by Heather (last edited Aug 01, 2018 12:05PM) (new)

Heather We have some more new members, I'm so glad you are here!! This is a favorite thread, we hope you enjoy it, too!

There is only one thing different about this thread. It is one picture of the day. There is a general theme for each month, I won't disclose what it is, you get to figure it out (But it's not hard)

The only rule to this thread is, only the person running this thread can post a picture here. You are welcome to comment on the one posted that day or any other day in the month, or on other people's comments, you can say whatever you want (keeping with the rules of the group of course). So please don't post a picture in this thread. That's all!

Remember, when you figure out the theme, please don't disclose it for others to be able to figure it out for themselves. But like I said, it's fairly easy after a few days.

Enjoy!


message 2: by Heather (last edited Aug 01, 2018 11:36AM) (new)

Heather

Nude Standing before a Mirror
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
1897

The indolent, cloistered lives of prostitutes were the subject of some of Lautrec’s most powerful works. He made about fifty paintings depicting them, as well as numerous drawings and prints, including a suite of color lithographs, Elles, which was completed the year before this painting. Lautrec does not flatter the woman’s naked figure, nor does he divulge the expression she sees in her mirror: she appears simply to be taking a stark appraisal of herself.

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collect...


message 3: by Heather (new)

Heather I like how this painting uses only a few different colors...blue, white, red then the one skin-color of the female, her orangish hair, and her black boots. She is the only thing in the painting that doesn't have the other red and blue and the only white is the clothing she is holding, not really on her. And no other object in the room has the same coloring as the subject of the painting. To me, this focuses my immediate attention on her (the objective of the painting, of course). The colors seem to balance out the painting as a whole.

I like how the, not acute or sharp 'detail', but pattern in the rug on which she is standing, it incorporates all three of the other colors in the painting bringing them to one center.

One can see more in the mirror than we see in the room itself and the way the bed and other furniture in the room goes outside of the edge of the painting makes the room look larger. My mind barely consciously, so to speak, continues the painting beyond the margins.

Interesting, probably coincidental, the red, blue and white in the painting are the colors of the French flag.

This is one of my favorites of Toulouse-Lautrec.


message 4: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments I particularly like how his colors bleed without being confined within the folds of the cloth or the lines demarking one object to another. And I am particularly intrigued how he has immersed himself in a subculture he would not ordinarily be part of.
I find it fascinating that artists have involved themselves in cultures to which they were not born to eg. Paul Gaugin with the South Pacific,Lautrec with brothels, Dorothy Lange with disenfranchised Oakies, John Steinbeck with the same.......Kollwitz with inner city slum dwellers....


message 5: by Hawaa (new)

Hawaa (hawaaayoub) | 4 comments It reminds me of Bellocq's images of prostitutes, where some of the faces were scratched off the plate (whether by Bellocq or someone else). Interestingly in the painting the subject's facial features are not clear, leaving the viewer to decipher/wonder at her state of mind from her stance, is she relaxed, does she feel uncomfortable, we are left wondering and drawing our own conclusions.

I believe some artists and other humanities have always been inspired, and take interest in people from different backgrounds and cultures; most civilisations have influences resulting from cross-culture experience.

I believe Lange became involved and interested in the displaced migrants due to her husband's work as a journalist. They cared enough to bring people's suffering to the attention of decision makers and the general public.

Whether they sought inspiration from other cultures, or wanted to deliver a message or bring attention about matters the majority may have remained unaware of, their art has enriched many generations with experiences culturally diverse.


message 6: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Lange was chosen by Roy Stryker who had been appointed head of the photography division of the FSA, I believe was the agency-Farm Security Administration. Her husband I believe was the head of a refugee camp. He had been fictionalized by John Steinbeck in the Grapes of Wrath. Lange was a commercial photographer with a studio in CA before accepting the job with the FSA.

Yes, I am glad you mentioned Belloq. I couldn`t recall his name. Thanks


message 7: by Heather (last edited Aug 02, 2018 09:46AM) (new)

Heather

Rokeby Venus
Diego Velázquez
Completed between 1647 and 1651


message 8: by Heather (new)

Heather

Las Meninas
Diego Velázquez
1656


message 9: by Heather (new)

Heather Has anyone guessed the theme yet? It's only been three paintings so far, but just curious. You may just state yes or no, but please don't disclose what you think it is!

We had some great discussion about this painting last year, there is so much to see and say! Thoughts anyone?


message 10: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Mirror, mirror on the wall, who`s the fairest of them all? Why the wicked witch, you better say, or she will fry you.


message 11: by Heather (new)

Heather I want to stick my tongue out at you Geoffrey! :P


message 12: by Heather (last edited Aug 04, 2018 08:05AM) (new)

Heather

Girl before a mirror
Pablo Picasso
1932

Picasso was married when he met Marie-Thérèse Walter who is the subject of the painting. During the 1930s, she became his favorite subject and in this painting he used colors and symbols to show the different ways he viewed her and the ways that she viewed herself. The art work is considered erotic in Picasso's art, and received a wide range of reactions and interpretations.

The painting is of woman looking into a mirror and the image is different which forms the basis of the interpretation. The woman in the painting is shown to be beautiful with smooth complexion and big eyes. The colors have been given to enhance the beauty of the woman. The front part painted with choicest of colors merges with rough colors that reflect in the mirror to highlight the difference.

Interpretations

How Pablo Picasso views his beloved forms the understanding of one interpretation where her beauty is the subject. The yellow side of her face represents happy times with Picasso. The bright colors represent the times together. This side of her face shows her youth in the makeup free completion. This woman is painted with colors that increase her beauty.

The reflection represents the other interpretation of how she views herself. The colors used here are dark and make her look very old. Instead of happiness the meaning here is more of hate and unhappiness, fear and as if aging is getting on to her indicative of her fear of losing her youth.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girl_be...

Does anyone have an interpretation of your own when you view this painting?


message 13: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Heather wrote: "I want to stick my tongue out at you Geoffrey! :P"

Sorry, I didn`t read your request.
Please put your tongue back in its place.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 95 comments I had guessed the theme before reading Geoffrey's post.(until reading Heather's first post in this month's read I didn't realise we weren't meant to post our guesses)

I love that first Toulouse-Lautrec. I have never seen it before & it is just so beautiful.


message 15: by Heather (new)

Heather Geoffrey wrote: "Heather wrote: "I want to stick my tongue out at you Geoffrey! :P"

Sorry, I didn`t read your request.
Please put your tongue back in its place."


You're forgiven, Geoffrey. :)


message 16: by Heather (new)

Heather Carol ꧁꧂ wrote: "I had guessed the theme before reading Geoffrey's post.(until reading Heather's first post in this month's read I didn't realise we weren't meant to post our guesses)

I love that first Toulouse-La..."


I thought someone would guess what I would choose as the theme from our recent posts in other threads.

I try to pick paintings that aren't so familiar. Of course, I do post those more popular. I like it, also and I hadn't seen it before, either.


message 17: by Heather (new)

Heather

Symphony in White, No. 2: The Little White Girl
James Abbott McNeill Whistler
1864

"The model is Joanna Hiffernan, the artist's mistress. Though the painting was originally called The Little White Girl, Whistler later started calling it Symphony in White, No. 2. By referring to his work in such abstract terms, he intended to emphasize his "art for art's sake" philosophy.

In this painting, Heffernan wears a ring on her ring finger, even though the two were not married. By this religious imagery, Whistler emphasizes the aesthetic philosophy behind his work."


http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Symphony_i...


message 18: by Hawaa (new)

Hawaa (hawaaayoub) | 4 comments Heather wrote: "Girl before a mirror
Pablo Picasso
1932

Picasso was married when he met Marie-Thérèse Walter who is the subject of the painting. During the 1930s, she became his favorite subject and in this pain..."


I see a woman who may be pregnant, the oval shape within an oval shape almost like a placenta in the womb and her belly slightly bulging in the shape of pregnancy; she stares at her image contemplating her exposed body, the fear similar to that of aging, but from the changes pregnancy may have on her body.

In the reflection the lines and colours resemble a head veil draping her head, similar to how the Virgin Mary is usually portrayed wearing a head veil.

Although both breasts in the woman's image are equally balanced, in the reflection they are positioned unevenly also indicating the possible effects of pregnancy and the changes she fears will happen to her body.


message 19: by Heather (new)

Heather Hawaa wrote: I see a woman who may be pregnant, the oval shape within an oval shape almost like a placenta in the womb and her belly slightly bulging in the shape of pregnancy; she stares at her image contemplating her exposed body, the fear similar to that of aging, but from the changes pregnancy may have on her body. "

That is a wonderful observation, Hawaa! I really like the representations you assigned to different aspects of the painting.

It does look like she could be pregnant. I agree, she could be contemplating and/or feeling contempt toward the effect it is having on her body. If she isn't pregnant, just the look in the mirror seems that she doesn't see herself in a good light. It seems she doesn't like what or who she sees. Maybe she doesn't like her looks, feels older, or something else about herself that she doesn't see with kindness or acceptance.

I agree with all of what you said as a possible explanation for the way Picasso painted this girl. Thank you!


message 20: by Hawaa (new)

Hawaa (hawaaayoub) | 4 comments Heather wrote: "Hawaa wrote: I see a woman who may be pregnant, the oval shape within an oval shape almost like a placenta in the womb and her belly slightly bulging in the shape of pregnancy; she stares at her im..."

You're welcome, Heather!


message 21: by Heather (new)

Heather

Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror
Parmigianino
1524

The painting depicts the young artist (then twenty one) in the middle of a room, distorted by the use of a convex mirror. The hand in the foreground is greatly elongated and distorted by the mirror. The work was painted on a specially-prepared convex panel in order to mimic the curve of the mirror used.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-po...


message 22: by Heather (new)

Heather There probably isn't too much to say about the painting I posted earlier. It's famous, it's convex, it's a mirror...
I'm going to post another one, hopefully less well-known.


message 23: by Heather (new)

Heather

The Pearl Necklace
Henry Tonks
1905

So since the majority or all of you following this thread have probably guessed the theme, this painting I threw in here to be a bit different.

It has the mirror except the mirror itself nor a reflection isn't visible. It's 'implied' by Tonks painting what looks like the mirror on her dresser while she looks at it holding her necklace. It's pretty obvious that she's looking into a mirror.

Any comments on this one? How many people are familiar with this painting, or Henry Tonks as an artist himself?


message 24: by Heather (new)

Heather

A Nude Woman Doing Her Hair Before a Mirror
Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg
1841
Neoclassicism
Hirschsprung Collection in Copenhagen

"With her right hand she has lifted and taken to the brown hair that is tightly put up with center parting and chignon. Her big red left earlobe has a gold glistening earring. her right earring is also seen, not in the mirror, and hairstyle are also different in the mirror. The head is turned slightly to the left and sunk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Nude_...


message 25: by Heather (new)

Heather

Woman Before a Mirror
Edouard Manet
1877


message 26: by Heather (new)

Heather

Venus with a Mirror
Titian
1555
National Gallery of Art

"The painting is said to celebrate the ideal beauty of the female form, or to be a critique of vanity, or perhaps both.

Titian made a number of paintings of the same subject, but this is the believed to be the earliest and the only version to be entirely by the hand of Titian, without additions by his assistants. it remained in his house until his death in 1576.[3]

X-rays of the painting have revealed that Titian painted it over a double portrait which he had abandoned. Titian kept the red cloak of one of the figures in the abandoned painting and placed it under Venus's arm.
"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_w...


message 27: by Heather (new)

Heather I'm sure you have all probably noticed, the theme could have been expanded to be 'women in front of a mirror' because looking back, there are only two other paintings that are not of this theme. The self-portrait by Parmigianino And Las Meninas by Velazquez.

The painting with more people by Velazquez has a lot of symbolism, or insinuations included, a subject upon which we have touched when we did that group book read awhile ago. The mirror in that painting is said to have the reflections of the couple who commissioned it, right? (My memory may be a bit rusty) and the people in the painting in their various attire, among other observations previously discussed.

The self-portrait was in the convex mirror which is interesting in itself showing the way the convexity of the mirror distorts his image.

But, all the others I have posted have been of females looking into a mirror. Some with cupid holding the mirror up for her to gaze at herself.

What does this particular fact mean to you?

Several thoughts come to mind for me, as said above in Wikipedia, it is "said to celebrate the ideal beauty of the female form" or "critique of vanity". My thoughts weren't necessarily the celebration of the female form, as females have been painted without mirrors for centuries and they could be glorifying their form even as standing alone, for example The Birth of Venus by Botticelli. She is standing alone on the half-shell, full figure seen, and could be said to 'glorify the female form'.

Thinking in this vein, my impression by all these paintings of women looking into a mirror brings me to the other conclusion, touching on the subject of vanity.

Why is it that they are all females looking into the mirror? Are these artists implying that females could be more vain? Or maybe we are more self-conscious of our appearance? Or maybe, as was described by Hawaa regarding Picasso's woman looking into the mirror:
"...she stares at her image contemplating her exposed body, the fear similar to that of aging, but from the changes pregnancy may have on her body.

Although both breasts in the woman's image are equally balanced, in the reflection they are positioned unevenly also indicating the possible effects of pregnancy and the changes she fears will happen to her body."


So, what are your thoughts about the whole topic of women looking into a mirror? Do you think of vanity? Self-criticism? or some other thoughts?

I'm interested in knowing where this 'theme' is going in August. First, there isn't as much discussion this month. Is there not much to say about any of this? Are all the paintings of the same 'woman looking into the mirror', alike? Do they all just represent one thing? Or is there more to each individual painting? Maybe not. Please share your thoughts!


message 28: by Heather (new)

Heather I'm going to share my thoughts of different paintings and the differences I see in each. (I will post the paintings again to avoid the need to scroll up to each to see what I'm talking about)

First:
Nude Standing before a Mirror by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec:

It is my impression that she is scrutinizing herself. In light of the knkowledge that Toulouse-Lautrec used prostitutes in many of his works brings me to think that maybe she is thinking of her life, maybe she has lost respect for herself by the way she lives and what she does. I don't think her look into the mirror at herself is one of vanity, but of disappointment or even disgust at her image. Not necessarily her body itself, but her body representing her and what she thinks of herself while looking into the mirror.


message 29: by Heather (last edited Aug 09, 2018 06:53AM) (new)

Heather Rokeby Venus by Diego Velázquez and Venus with a Mirror by Titian are both of the same goddess, Venus. These paintings seem to me that the women are looking at themselves with vanity, they are proud and satisfied if not well-pleased at what they see. Yes, these two, for me, represent vanity of women.https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...#


Rokeby Venus


Venus with a Mirror by Titian


message 30: by Heather (last edited Aug 09, 2018 06:47AM) (new)

Heather I already commented on what Picasso's painting make me think of. Moving on to "Symphony in White, No. 2: The Little White Girl by James Abbott McNeill Whistler



To me, it looks as if she is daydreaming, or reminiscing? She is deep in thought. The fact that she is in front of a mirror makes me think that she is thinking about herself and/or some situation in which she finds herself. I do believe that the mirror represents her deep-in-thought look to show that some of her thought is concentrated on herself. She doesn't look happy. In this particular painting, since she is not looking directly at her own reflection, I don't know that she thinks disgust or dislike for herself, but maybe who or what she is in the situation of which she is thinking.

Also, it seems that her profile is neutral whereas the reflection of her face is one of sadness. Maybe she puts on the 'neutral' mask in the situation but inside she is unhappy.


message 31: by Heather (last edited Aug 09, 2018 06:52AM) (new)

Heather The Pearl Necklace by Henry Tonks

Maybe the necklace was a gift, from a lover? She is gazing at the necklace she is wearing and maybe thinking of the person who gave it to her? What the necklace means to her in relation to what the giver means to her? Maybe she is just admiring its beauty and seeing how it looks on herself. But perhaps 'admiration' isn't the word, she doesn't have a look of satisfaction on her face, but again, she seems deep in thought. What could she be thinking?


message 32: by Heather (last edited Aug 09, 2018 07:07AM) (new)

Heather
A Nude Woman Doing Her Hair Before a Mirror by Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg

Yet another painting that seems like the woman is deep in thought. She isn't looking at herself but still holding her hair. Maybe she is only thinking of how to do her hair, but it seems that her thoughts go deeper than that. Why is she arranging her hair? Maybe she is thinking about that? She isn't looking at herself, either. What is she thinking about? The fact that the drapery on her is below the waist just above the buttocks, seems that she doesn't dislike her body, but that isn't what she is thinking about. It seems she is not concentrating on her looks, but about something else maybe not seen in the painting. This painting doesn't imply vanity, IMO, but it does seem that she is not scrutinizing or thinking derogatorily about herself or reflection. The painting takes us somewhere else besides just how she looks in a mirror. What is in the box? Why is she resting her hand on the table? A lot to think about in this painting, and I like how defined it is.


message 33: by Heather (last edited Aug 09, 2018 07:10AM) (new)

Heather Woman Before a Mirror by Edouard Manet



In this painting, as opposed to the others, her reflection is blurred. We can't see the look on her face. She is holding something in her hand to her side. What is it? Does it represent something? Did she just finish dressing and getting ready and now appraising how she looks? Because we don't see her face in the mirror, this work leaves much to contemplate. I love the way Manet paints this piece!

The final painting I posted today I have already discussed. Thoughts on any or all of these anyone?


message 34: by Heather (new)

Heather

Woman at the Mirror
Joan Miró
1956
L:ithograph



Woman Doing Her Hair before a Mirror
Joan Miró
1938


message 35: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Miro!!!!!!!!!


message 36: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1943 comments I’ve always thought it appropriate that his name translates to “he looked.”


message 37: by Heather (new)

Heather I didn’t know that, in what language?


message 38: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Spanish.
But it really translates as "I look", not he.


message 39: by Heather (new)

Heather Is that where the word ‘mirror’ came from? Interesting!


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather

Dali from the Back Painting Gala from the Back Eternalized
Salvador Dali
1972-1973


message 41: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Hmmmm. Interesting speculation Heather. Very perceptive of you if true. Even if not.


message 42: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1943 comments Heather wrote: "Is that where the word ‘mirror’ came from? Interesting!"

They both come from the Latin.


message 43: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1943 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Spanish.
But it really translates as "I look", not he."


I think the accent mark makes it past tense singular, doesn’t it?


message 44: by Heather (last edited Aug 14, 2018 04:01AM) (new)

Heather Geoffrey wrote: "Hmmmm. Interesting speculation Heather. Very perceptive of you if true. Even if not."

Well thank you Geoffrey


message 45: by Heather (new)

Heather

Barber's Shop (Uncle Zusman)
Marc Chagall
1914


message 46: by Heather (new)

Heather

The Mirror
Marc Chagall
1911-1912


message 47: by Heather (new)

Heather

Quai to Flowers from Behind the Mirror
Marc Chagall
1954


message 48: by Heather (new)

Heather

Behind the Mirror
Marc Chagall
1964


message 49: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Ruth wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "Spanish.
But it really translates as "I look", not he."

I think the accent mark makes it past tense singular, doesn’t it?"


Oops. You´re right Ruth


message 50: by Heather (new)

Heather

Woman at Mirror
Joseph Mallord William Turner
1830


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