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2018 Book Discussions > Reservoir 13 - Chapters 7 to 13 and Whole Book (Spoilers) (Aug 2018)

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message 1: by Hugh (last edited Aug 01, 2018 03:31AM) (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
This is the place to discuss anything you like (or dislike) about this book without worrying about spoiling (not that there is much to spoil). How did the book live up/down to your expectations? How do you feel about McGregor's deliberate decision to leave Becky's fate open (he has said that he didn't form a view in his own mind about that)? Did you enjoy the structure or did you find it frustrating?


message 2: by Whitney (last edited Aug 02, 2018 08:27AM) (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
There was a study recently showing that people for whom books had been "spoiled" tended to enjoy them more. I think this was the case for me. The only thing I knew going in was that the mystery of the missing girl was never solved. Reading this as a whodunit, searching for clues among the description of life in the village, would have been frustrating. Reading it as a survey of the unchanging / changing life in the village was captivating.

The thing I most appreciated about it was the light touch. The most intensely personal or emotional moments were discussed with the same dispassionate tone as the weather, and mostly took place off screen with just a brief description signaling what may have, or likely, occurred; the bruises on Irene's arm, the fire in the caravan, the light in the window of 'the widower's" daughter, people simply 'being seen' somewhere, etc. I also loved the way the repetition of the regular events in the village each year served as a trellis for the regular and mostly unchanging parts of village life, with the changes weaving within that largely fixed structure.

I have my own thoughts about how the missing girl hovering over the events affected it, but I'd like to hear what other people think.


message 3: by Julie (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 196 comments Whitney wrote: "The thing I most appreciated about it was the light touch. The most intensely personal or emotional moments were discussed with the same dispassionate tone as the weather..."

This probably has much to do with why I didn't like it. I like books that make me feel.


message 4: by Joy D (new)

Joy D Whitney wrote: "Reading this as a whodunit, searching for clues among the description of life in the village, would have been frustrating."

You have hit on one of the main reasons I didn't like it. In this case, being "spoiled" about the mystery not ever being solved would have helped. I would have taken a different approach to noticing the nuances rather than trying to figure out what happened.


message 5: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2465 comments Julie wrote: "I like books that make me feel. ..."

Julie -- with your apparent sensitivities about feelings in the workings of the world, do you have thoughts on the feelings that did or didn't continue to exist in the community for so long after the loss of the young girl? (I think particularly of the varieties of feelings of unease that continued to pervade -- and they lead me to ponder the significance of closure for us as humans.)


message 6: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 18 comments I just finished it and found myself totally absorbed in it.
I really loved it and it fascinates me how much it ressembles life.


message 7: by Bretnie (new)

Bretnie | 569 comments I went into it knowing nothing about it and at times I only kept reading in the hopes that I’d have at least a little better picture of “what happened” to Rebecca, or Becky, or sometimes Bex. (Yep, didn’t care for the repetitiveness.)

I kind of wish I knew what to expect (or not expect) ahead of time, but I also wonder if I had known, if I just would have stopped reading.


message 8: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "Whitney wrote: "The thing I most appreciated about it was the light touch. The most intensely personal or emotional moments were discussed with the same dispassionate tone as the weather..."

This probably has much to do with why I didn't like it. I like books that make me feel. ."


Whoa, I wasn't trying to imply it didn't make me feel! It just didn't hammer you over the head with important events, but let you fill in the blanks on your own. I felt for Irene at the mention of her bruises as much as if there was a explicit scene of her helplessness as Andrew grabbed and wrenched her arm. In a way I think this puts the reader more in the position of another villager, knowing with varying degrees of certainty what's happening behind closed doors.


message 9: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 18 comments Whitney wrote: "Julie wrote: "Whitney wrote: "The thing I most appreciated about it was the light touch. The most intensely personal or emotional moments were discussed with the same dispassionate tone as the weat..."

Exactely my opinion, but you put it in very elegant words.


message 10: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
Well put Whitney. I saw the narrative voice as a sort of collective consciousness of the village - which is why the man who moved in remained nameless.

I am interested in the role of the Becky story. McGregor has said that he was originally going to make her younger and that 13 was just old enough to introduce the possibility that she could have run away and survived. For me marketing the book as a mystery was crassly stupid.

For me the repetition was very effective - mostly because things did change subtly from year to year, seasons and regular events are important to rural communities and if you follow it carefully you can trace a gradual evolution (for example the reduction in the number of teenagers which mirrors what is happening in many British rural communities where the locals and younger people are priced out of the housing market.

I also accept that if the descriptions of the landscape and the natural world leave you cold and you want plot and character development this is not the book for you.

And if anything even less happens in a real small village.


message 11: by Lily (last edited Aug 06, 2018 10:59AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2465 comments I find myself contrasting the book with others about lost children, such as Stewart O'Nan's Songs for the Missing and The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold. It has been long enough since I read either of those but what my memory of them is faulty, but I get a sense of almost a genre or type of story here, and each looks at the intense feelings associated with such an event from a different perspective. O'Nan seemed to focus on the initial search and the subsequent stresses and strains on the family members. Sebold takes the reader to the view of the abducted herself. (Apparently the fears associated with even the possibility are great enough that a number of people (women, in particular?) will refuse to read such stories.)

(O'Nan's book was a Barnes & Noble choice for which copies were supplied to self-selected readers among regular participants in their online book discussions at the time.)


message 12: by Bretnie (last edited Aug 02, 2018 10:02PM) (new)

Bretnie | 569 comments Here's one thing that I struggled with that maybe you guys can help me with. Why did McGregor make the girl an outsider? Her family was on vacation there, right? Part of me was frustrated that a town would have such a deep impact from a girl gone missing who they didn't really know.

That if she had been from the town, the whole plot of "a girl goes missing and here's how it impacts the town and everyone in it" would have been a little more "believable" for me. (although I hate talking about books being believable or not, so apologies for even bringing that into the conversation!)


message 13: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
An interview with McGregor with some interesting explanations:
http://bookanista.com/jon-mcgregor/

We had a very lively discussion of this book last year over at The Mookse and the Gripes here:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 14: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
Bretnie wrote: "Here's one thing that I struggled with that maybe you guys can help me with. Why did McGregor make the girl an outsider?"
I can't speak for McGregor, but if the girl had been local, everyone would have known something about her and many of the possibilities would be closed off early. There is more about her family in The Reservoir Tapes.


message 15: by Claire (new)

Claire  | 18 comments The feeling I got from the book was that of drinking coffee with a neighbour every day or week and discussing what has happened in the village. Some answers are never given, but with time passing by new elements appear. Peoples lives generally change little, they come and go and time passes by with small almost invisable changes)

I don’t think the girl gone missing is an important element. It is only a trigger to reactions and the starting point to observe peoples lives.
It could have been something else ( an unknown man found murdered, an accident and vanished car,...) but a girl gone missing is a better starting point ( lots of interactions and many different scenarios)


message 16: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
Claire wrote: "The feeling I got from the book was that of drinking coffee with a neighbour every day or week and discussing what has happened in the village. Some answers are never given, but with time passing b..."

Yes, I think you're right in that's exactly how it seems. What McGregor tells us are the facts that start the conversation ("How about that fire in the caravan?"), what we fill in in our heads is the speculative gossip that would follow.


message 17: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
On a lighter note, is there a word for that exhalation of breath, half smile, and looking down that people do when something is funny but they know it's totally wrong? Because that's what I did when the girl dressed up as Zombie Rebecca on Mischief Night. It's exactly the kind of asinine stunt that my friends might have pulled as young teenagers.


message 18: by Peter (last edited Aug 03, 2018 01:49PM) (new)

Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments It's an interesting structure, but not nearly as experimental as, say, David Markson's later stuff. It worked for me. I found myself tracing the lives of most of the characters to see what would happen to them next. In some ways the missing girl was a distraction, or at least, not that important.

Being sold as a mystery was, alas, inevitable given how books are marketed. Otherwise the marketing people would have had very little to work with.

Mind you, having written one book like this, I'm not sure the author ought to ever do exactly this again. It's been done now after all.


message 19: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
I very much doubt that he would try to do it again. All of his 4 novels so far are very different...


message 20: by Bretnie (new)

Bretnie | 569 comments Claire wrote: "The feeling I got from the book was that of drinking coffee with a neighbour every day or week and discussing what has happened in the village. Some answers are never given, but with time passing by new elements appear. Peoples lives generally change little, they come and go and time passes by with small almost invisable changes)

I don’t think the girl gone missing is an important element. It is only a trigger to reactions and the starting point to observe peoples lives.
It could have been something else ( an unknown man found murdered, an accident and vanished car,...) but a girl gone missing is a better starting point ( lots of interactions and many different scenarios)"


This is such a great description Claire, thank you.

I bet if I read this book again in a few years I would enjoy it more. Enough time to pass that I'd forget a lot of the characters but still remember what to expect. I'd know I'd need to read it at a time when I don't mind a slower pace.


message 21: by Bretnie (new)

Bretnie | 569 comments Hugh wrote: "I can't speak for McGregor, but if the girl had been local, everyone would have known something about her and many of the possibilities would be closed off early. There is more about her family in The Reservoir Tapes."

True - the mystery of who she was is a big part of the book.

Maybe I'm thinking of Twin Peaks a little too much (which I just finished the new season) where everyone knew Laura so well and the impact of her death was huge on the town. So still a story of the individual lives of the characters in the town, but with this overarching incident that shadows their lives and the town itself.


message 22: by Whitney (last edited Aug 05, 2018 08:07PM) (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
I just finished listening to The Reservoir Tapes. They were very good in their own right as interconnected short stories. They also had enough scandal and shady happenings that I'm starting to think that the sleepy little village of the book is the Peyton Place of Derbyshire.


message 23: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 180 comments In the small town near the village where I was brought up a 14 year old girl went missing just before Christmas and was later found dead in the local woods. Lots of rumours circulated and the police still believe someone in the community knows what happens but despite extensive investigations, 25 years later the case is still unsolved- indeed it isn't 100% clear if it was murder, manslaugther Or a pure accident. The Reservoir Tapes with their different theories but no answers rang very true to me.


message 24: by Whitney (last edited Aug 05, 2018 09:56PM) (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
Paul wrote: "The Reservoir Tapes with their different theories but no answers rang very true to me...."

I also thought that the lack of resolution and various unproven speculations were very true to reality. Frequently you just don't get answers.


message 25: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 180 comments I rather like the way Andrew claims to know what happened but won't say


message 26: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
I breezed right by that, but yes. It adds yet another layer of uncertainty over everything.


message 27: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
Whitney wrote: "I just finished listening to The Reservoir Tapes. They were very good in their own right as interconnected short stories. They also had enough scandal and shady happenings that I'm ..."
For me The Tapes failed a little in their original conception (a weekly radio monologue that casual listeners could dip in and out of) but worked really well as a book - I was able to make much more sense of them and make many more connections without the long gap between episodes. I suspect listening to the audio over a shorter space of time would be better than spacing them out over 15 weeks.


message 28: by Hugh (last edited Aug 06, 2018 07:01AM) (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
I hope you have forgiven me for reopening a discussion that some may feel was done to death a year ago in other groups, but I hope that the space for reflection since then has been productive, and if a few more people have come to appreciate it, I will feel vindicated (I know from last year's debates that it a book that has strongly divided opinions). Much of the book remains vivid to me over a year after I read it.


message 29: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
I listened to all the tapes in a couple days. I think you're right in that spacing them out a week at a time, many of the connections would have been lost.

I'm not a member of the other groups that discussed this book, so I'm happy it was selected over here.


message 30: by Marc (last edited Aug 06, 2018 01:13PM) (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 2590 comments Mod
I liked the way the event came to define the town externally. When one of the children goes to college, one of the first things that happens when she tells her new friends where she's from is they immediately define her as being from the place where the girl went missing. Made me think about the many places I would know next to nothing about if not for tragedy/mystery and now their name alone defines them (Sandy Hook, Mai Lai, etc.). The event becomes like a marker by which other change is measured (it's been X years since she went missing). It's almost like a temporal/emotional anchor point for memory. And it scars the sense of place and normality or peace.


message 31: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2465 comments Marc wrote: "Made me think about the many places I would know next to nothing about if not for tragedy/mystery and now their name alone defines them (Sandy Hook, Mai Lai, etc.). ..."

Ground Zero... (Well, you probably would still know about the area, but in entirely different contexts and without that name.) But I suspect at least those of us over fifty probably can think of parallels in stories we have lived -- only we might not have previously considered them from this perspective. A major economic layoff, a particular death, a new road, a large new subdivision, .... As you say, marker events from which we measure other changes.


message 32: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 2590 comments Mod
I was thinking a bit more about Whitney's post saying that spoilers may actually help people enjoy books more and I would think this would particularly impact genre-writing (or books that appear like they might be related to a genre... say, a mystery in this case). It has to center on expectations--for me, if I'm expecting a book to be one way (funny, lyrical, "ground-breaking," etc.) and it doesn't meet those expectations, I'm either going to be disappointed/frustrated, or I'm going to have to adjust very quickly and go where the book actually takes me instead of where I think it should take me. It's not always easy for me to make that mental transition and let go of the expectation.

In that sense, I guess certain narrative conventions like a more traditional story arc, a central character, etc. are also expectations for readers. Just thinking through some of the reasons this book may have turned away some readers.

I loved the way there weren't even paragraph divisions when it came to updates--McGregor moved from updating us about birds, to the human twins, to weather patterns, to town events... You could feel the sort of motion and layering of life. Time's progression made tangible.


message 33: by Paul (new)

Paul Fulcher (fulcherkim) | 180 comments That slipping from one to the other was what he has called "The rhythm of the non-sequitur"


message 34: by Linda (new)

Linda | 71 comments I finished yesterday, but have not had time to comment fully. In short, I was pleasantly surprised by this book although I went in with the knowledge that it was centered around a murder. I was not disappointed that the murder was not solved as that outcome 13 years later mirrors reality in many cases. Given that this book had a different feeling from the outset from "normal" murder mysteries, I was not surprised that the murder remained unsolved, and as I neared the end I think I would have been surprised it if had been solved. This is in stark contrast to one particular murder mystery that I read years ago where the mystery was not solved and many readers were extremely upset.

I thought this book had a soothing effect as I listened to the audiobook, and perhaps it was just the type of book I needed at the moment. I say "soothing", but that was just how the style of writing came across, not necessarily the nature of the various events.

I liked the rhythmic nature and the simplistic way that the author related events. Whitney said it nicely in message #2 - "The thing I most appreciated about it was the light touch. The most intensely personal or emotional moments were discussed with the same dispassionate tone as the weather, and mostly took place off screen with just a brief description signaling what may have, or likely, occurred..."


message 35: by Peter (new)

Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments You know, we've been talking about the structure of the book, the technique used to write it, the feel of it, how true to life it feels, but not really about the events of the book (except to say the disappearance is never solved). Not what in a more conventional might be described as the plot. Does this book have something you could call a plot? Does it simply do without one? If it doesn't have a plot, would it be better with one? (Of if it does have one, would it be better with a stronger one?)


message 36: by Lily (last edited Aug 10, 2018 07:29PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2465 comments Peter wrote: "...Does this book have something you could call a plot? Does it simply do without one? If it doesn't have a plot, would it be better with one? (Of if it does have one, would it be better with a stronger one?..."

Peter -- my own reaction: Like any community in which one lives, R13 has multiple plots. But we must care to follow and recognize those plots. R13 was rather like that for me; in this case, I didn't really develop enough caring for any particular protagonists to follow their plot in depth, but I kind of got to know about them and what to expect, as I do about many members of the community within which I function and live -- which as a retired person with some "volunteer" connections, is considerably different than was "community" to me when I was working.


message 37: by Marc (new)

Marc (monkeelino) | 2590 comments Mod
I'm not sure I'd say it has a "plot" in any conventional sense, although it does have a kind of narrative arc. Those who were children at the beginning are returning to the village after going away to school. A new generation will soon be taking over, so to speak. I think, in part, because it did not seem to have a traditional plot, nor main characters, it makes it somewhat hard to discuss. I didn't even bother trying to keep track of the characters' names--I started to think of them like the wildlife in a sense. Oh, there's the couple with the twins, or the lady with the abusive guy, or the son who last saw the missing girl. What this book seems to have is an absence upon which every other presence either refers back to or blissfully continues unawares. Technology and change subtly start to carve out their own space and traditions alter/evolve (as someone more aptly stated either earlier in this thread or in the background/non-spoiler thread). Almost like my reaction to some poetry, I was left with more a feeling of an experience or a feeling than what I would think of as a straight "story" per se. Or, as Lily, said, we're left with many stories, each of which did seem to have conflict or struggle to varying degrees.

Were there "events" that stood out to you, Peter?


message 38: by Peter (last edited Aug 11, 2018 09:09AM) (new)

Peter Aronson (peteraronson) | 516 comments Marc wrote: "Were there "events" that stood out to you, Peter?"

Not really, more of a gestalt of change. Oh, I can remember details, but none of them really seem any more important than any others.


message 39: by Whitney (new)

Whitney | 2088 comments Mod
I got pretty wrapped up in the individual stories. I think any one of them could be fleshed out into a novel, or at least a satisfying novella or short story. I appreciate how we experience them in a greater or lessor degree of intimacy, as a fellow villager would, but I feel a like the town gossip, wanting to know more juicy details. (Who set the fire in the caravan? What was Jones' relationship to the widower? etc.. )

I think the only story that actually had a somewhat conventional resolution was Irene's.


message 40: by Linda (new)

Linda | 71 comments Peter wrote: " Does this book have something you could call a plot? If it doesn't have a plot, would it be better with one?"

Marc wrote: "I'm not sure I'd say it has a "plot" in any conventional sense, although it does have a kind of narrative arc. A new generation will soon be taking over, so to speak."


I agree with Marc that it doesn't have a traditional plot, but that there was a sense of a beginning and trajectory towards an end as any one person's life has. It felt to me that at the beginning, there was a lot of focus on the younger generation, the kids who had known Becky and had hung out together. And although towards the end there were new children mentioned living in the village, it seemed my focus was more on the older folks - the man who passed away, along with Richard's mother. And the time that comes when one's parents pass and the children must figure out what to do with the house.

I actually did try to remember who was who in the village, and so I did get frustrated when I couldn't remember right off the history of a particular person. And like Whitney, I wanted to find out more "juicy details".

I think that if the book had had more of a central plot, that the feeling of the book would have been completely different. I'm wondering if perhaps the small details might have gotten lost within the larger scope of "the plot"? I think not having a plot mirrors one's own life. We all go about our days, day in and day out, following more or less of a schedule. If nothing "big" is happening at the moment (planned vacation, special holiday, etc), it may seem monotonous. However, it's the small details that make up our life, which are so important to slow down and notice - Watching the squirrel running across the fence with his peanut he found as you're standing at the kitchen window. Slowing down in the mornings to help teach your young daughter to tie her shoes on her own. Helping your elderly neighbor across the street prune back her roses. I think these are the things we look back on our life and remember. To me, the book felt similar to this.


message 41: by Mari (new)

Mari (silvicultrix) | 9 comments Everyone has said so much on this novel here and elsewhere that I'm not sure I have much to add to the discussion, coming late as I am.

Something which struck me more on reading the novel for a second time than the first time around is the subtle humour in many of the descriptions of village life, for example “There was some confusion at the first Workers’ Educational Association meeting of the term when the book-keeping tutor turned up with a bag of protective clothing and a demonstration hive” (ch. 4). I felt that the quirkiness usually found in any diverse group of people was not at all overplayed in this novel (some writers can just pile it on), and this is one of the things I most enjoyed about it this time around. There is kind of compassion with village life in the writing that really appeals to me.

I’m now going to listen to The Reservoir Tapes – thanks to everyone who mentioned them, otherwise I wouldn’t have known about their existence.


message 42: by Lucy (new)

Lucy | 8 comments I agree very much with what Mari says about both humour and compassion. It's about four months since I read the book first, - I loved it then and, if anything, it improves on re-reading.

For me the number and diversity of the characters didn't distract from the narrative focus but instead made it all the more moving. It seems to suggest how traces of individual existence (even of someone seemingly peripheral to the community) are carried through time in the lives of others. These details might not even be consciously recalled but persist in subtle ways.

McGregor's feel for the landscape is remarkable, and is also most powerfully expressed in tiny details. It is as though we as readers stoop and peer into hedgerows, or find our attention suddenly caught by a seemingly unimportant thing. None of these processes provide any answers but create the strange feeling that, though we're detached from everything in the story, we are compelled to look at it closely. It says so much about memory and about human community too. Definitely worth re-reading...


message 43: by Sue (new)

Sue | 61 comments I just finished today. I enjoyed reading everyone's comments, and agree this was a very soothing story. It felt a little like sitting at the beach watching the waves wash in and out.

I will add one personal note. I know there are a few posters who grew up in a village setting similar to the one found in this book.

I had the privilege of living in a similar village for a couple years in my 20's. My husband and I were referred to "Our Americans". Literally every single person in the village seemed to know who we were as had put together our story based on any shred of information we shared.

I felt embraced by that community more than any place I've lived before or since. I sincerely wish this book had existed then. But reading it now, I could see how we were likely viewed by the village.


message 44: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
Last day for this one today - as usual the discussion threads will remain open for late contributions. Thanks to everyone who has helped to make this a lively discussion.


message 45: by James E. (new)

James E. Martin | 76 comments I just finished it and liked it. It has a poetic feel. There is some truly beautiful writing peppered through the book. It brought to mind some of the "revolt from the village" novels and story cycles in 20th C Am Lit. Yes, there's beauty in the seasonal cycles but also lots of repressed emotions, miscommunication, unfulfilled desire, etc. The village is certainly not romanticised and I appreciated that.


message 46: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 154 comments I also just finished this and loved it. It has a wonderful rhythm, of the seasons and in the writing. I'm so happy I saw in the non-spoiler thread that it was not really a murder mystery and that it was repetitive. With that frame I could relax into it and enjoy it for what it was - I could hardly put it down. I started this in audio, but couldn't keep track, so glad a library copy of the print book was available.

Also, thanks to Paul who created the list of characters. I became very attached to the people so was glad to have that to refer to initially. The "mystery" of this book to me was how people's lives were going to play out. Would Richard ever get up his nerve to make his move with Cathy? How would the lives/relationships of the teens go as they became university age? (for a couple of examples)

I grew up in a small town in rural Illinois in the States, so while I couldn't exactly relate to the geography of the area and the issues they were experiencing, I definitely could relate to how everyone knows everyone's business and also the ebb and flow of the seasons.

While reading, I pictured things clearly (well, after looking up all the bird species, plants and what the heck well-dressing was :)), playing out almost like a tv series. At the end of each block of text where McGregor wrote things like "The butterflies were out. The fieldfares were away, raising their young in the colder north." I pictured a chorus to the side singing those lines. This was such an evocative book!

I've enjoyed reading everyone's comments - Hugh, this was indeed a lively discussion and an enriching one as well. Two of my IRL friends are reading this so we can discuss. It will be fun to tell them of some of your perspectives.

Lastly, I'll mention a movie that this reminded me of. Another Year, starring Jim Broadbent. It takes place over the four seasons of a year and starts out in an allotment. Loved the movie for it's seasonal rhythm.


message 47: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 15 comments I just finished and LOVED it! I've watched the interview, thanks Hugh, and plan to check the Mookse and Gripes thread too. I didn't feel cheated that the mystery wasn't solved, but I don't know how I'd have felt if I'd known that ahead of time.

I think I'll consider this an excellent choose-your-own-ending story. Some characters were "eliminated from my enquiries", as the police are fond of saying, but some certainly remain possibilities. And people do get away with murder all the time.

If McGregor ever wanted to, he could have write another novel where someone stumbles across evidence of her (alive or bones) years in the future. It would still make a good starting point for a different story.

Meanwhile, I did a review with a few photos of well-dressing for fun. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 48: by Hugh (new)

Hugh (bodachliath) | 2593 comments Mod
Thanks Patty and Suzy


message 49: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 154 comments Thanks for including your review, Patty - loved the pics and will read when I have a few minutes. You're reminding me that I need to write my own review.


message 50: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 15 comments Hugh wrote: "Thanks Patty and Suzy"

Suzy wrote: "Thanks for including your review, Patty - loved the pics and will read when I have a few minutes. You're reminding me that I need to write my own review."

I’m only sorry I was so late to the discussion, but I am SO pleased it was on your list so I was prompted to read it!


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