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Austen on Film > Northanger Abbey picks?

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message 1: by Claudia (new)

Claudia | 25 comments Hi everyone,

So I was thinking about how I've seen most of JA adaptations and it just hit me - I have never seen a Northanger Abbey movie.

Do any of you know any good adaptations for this one, or one you really liked? Thanks! :D


message 2: by jennifer (new)

jennifer (mascarawand) | 8 comments I like the version with Peter Firth as Henry and Robert Hardy as Mr. Tilney. It's probably close to 20 years old.


message 3: by Amanda (new)

Amanda | 47 comments The new one from Masterpiece is pretty good too!


message 4: by Claudia (new)

Claudia | 25 comments Thank you! :)


message 5: by Rachael (last edited Sep 16, 2009 04:41PM) (new)

Rachael (rprensner) | 35 comments I have to put in a strong plug for the new PBS Northanger Abbey. It is just beautiful and sweet. The girl who plays Catherine has a very natural performance- it blends right into the story, while supporting and contributing to it. Henry Tilney is great- I think of him as the "good guy" hero and the actor who portrays him makes him very tender but at the same time full of vitality. The costumes and sets are a visual feast.
I must say it had a little bit of modern feel- in a couple points it nearly felt like Catherine was being flirtatious, but then again she is Austen's most naive, unguarded heroine, so perhaps it was just that aspect of her character.
Overall a great movie and highly reccomended- just gave it to a friend for her birthday.


message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Sep 15, 2009 06:32AM) (new)

Rachael said "I must say it had a little bit of modern feel- it a couple points it nearly felt like Catherine was being flirtatious"

This was true of all of the latest PBS adaptations: Anne went running out of the concert hall after Wentworth (she did a lot of running), Fanny Price did a lot of flirting, too. But the stories are so good and the adaptations kept to the stories, so I could ignore most of it.




message 7: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Jeannette, I noticed the running scenes in the movie also ?!? Maybe it was meant to signify frantic emotion. The acting was good in that version, but the running could be seen as disorienting. It was effective, just too long. Maybe the director was overwhelmed because he/she had such a great filming location?


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Sarah wrote: "Jeannette, I noticed the running scenes in the movie also ?!? Maybe it was meant to signify frantic emotion. The acting was good in that version, but the running could be seen as disorienting. I..."

Yes, the running and the way they filmed the movie conveyed Anne's sense of desperation, time running out. The locations are beautiful, very authentic.

Commenting on Rachel's observation ("having a modern feel"), I just can't see Austen's Anne running about Bath. (Where did Wentworth get to so quickly, anyway??) It was more moving to know that she was overcome with emotion and not just winded from sprinting! ;) Also, in the newest adaptations the ladies seem less "restricted" in public -- kissing on the street! -- than in the novels' time period.




TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) Rachael wrote: "I have to put in a strong plug for the new PBS Northanger Abbey. It is just beautiful and sweet. The girl who plays Catherine has a very natural performance- it blends right into the story, while s..."

I'm always glad when PBS does a new Austen adaptation, but at the same time a little burdened. I have the older NORTHANGER ABBEY and now I'll want to buy the new one as well! I mean, if you're an Austen fan, you are an Austen fan! And can't get enough of her.



message 10: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Jeannette wrote: "Sarah wrote: "Jeannette, I noticed the running scenes in the movie also ?!? Maybe it was meant to signify frantic emotion. The acting was good in that version, but the running could be seen as di..."

Jeannette, I have a broad view about the Austen ladies in the new versions and their displays of affection. We have talked here in the group before and some readers just don't think it would have been Austen's intention.

My view is that these main ladies are finally with their heart's desire. I think they might be inspired to kiss. They aren't prone to kissing in the street, but at long last, they have cleared up their struggles and would naturally relax a little -- after all the restrictions of society have caused some of their problems to start with -- they may not mind a little public statement. ha ha




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