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What did you read last month? > What I read ~~ July 2018

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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments

Share with us what you read July 2018 !

Please provide:

~ A GoodReads link
~ A few sentences telling us how you felt about the book.
~ How would you rate the book


message 2: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 29, 2018 09:12PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments I only read one book this month but it was a winner. It took me longer than usual even though the book was under 300 pages. That was because I kept looking up all the various YouTube videos of the people and dancer mentioned. And one YouTube video leads to a dozen others. :)

Non Fiction
Rate 5/5

And Then We Danced A Voyage into the Groove by Henry Alford And Then We Danced: A Voyage into the Groove~~~Henry Alford

It started off a bit slow but then I really got into it. The book is partly humorous and also an informative take on a middle aged man who becomes enamored with Zumba. He than tries out various other dance forms and gives a bit of history along the way. If you love dance, you will enjoy this book.

The book came to my attention when it was featured on the cover of the NY Times Book Review.


message 3: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments If you can only read one book in a month, it's terrific that it is rewarding! I can see why this one took you awhile--the video aspect is worth remembering. Too often i wait until i'm totally finished with a book before following up on notes. Naturally, by that time i'm ready to let it all go most often.

I am hoping to complete one more book by the 31st, so am holding off sharing my July list.


message 4: by John (last edited Jul 31, 2018 10:46PM) (new)

John | 1203 comments I liked all three that I read:

Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe - author does a good job of proving her point that the border area of Bulgaria with Greece and Turkey has been a flashpoint for generations.

The Boarding-House - author's fans might not appreciate it's quirkiness, preferring his more serious works about Irish identity, but I felt it was a great character-driven ironic farce.

Finally, Insomniac City: New York, Oliver, and Me truly lived up to showing both a New York and an Oliver Sacks other wouldn't see.


message 5: by Samanta (last edited Aug 01, 2018 06:10AM) (new)

Samanta   (almacubana) | 189 comments My reads for July:

The Story of the Girl Whose Birds Flew Away by Bushra al-Fadil
Genre: Short Story
Review: A story of a young man who who meets a young beautiful girl accompanied by her sister and is enamoured by her beauty. It is set in Sudan and the story won the Caine Prize for 2017. (4 stars)

Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
Genre: Fiction
Review: Interesting read about the modern immersion of physical books and technology. The premise is rather good, but the end was rushed and, to me, implausible. (3 stars)

Everyday Use by Alice Walker
Genre: Short Story
Review: If we are talking about Walker's writing style, this would be a typical for her; beautiful writing, vivid imagery and going to extremes searching for identity in a society that does not accept you as you are. (4 stars)

Zagrebačka županija/ Zagreb County by Empirium Ekspert (no photo)
Genre: Tourist brochure
Review: A review of all the things you can see and do if you visit Zagreb County. Of course, the writing style is flowery but the brochure still gives you a fair amount of feasible information. (5 stars)

The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe by David I. Kertzer (no photo)
Genre: History
Review: This was one of those I've been postponing for ages but finally decided to stick to. I've found out many interesting things I did not know anything about. I was appalled to read some of Mussolini's quotes. He was a true dictator. I didn't particularly like Pope Pius XI. I thought him a tyrant, a bully, a spoiled brat and a narrow-minded dictator, something I never would have thought about a man who spent a large part of his life among books, but as he began to develop conscience (although too late), my scorn for him lessened. I have to read more about his successor, Pius XII, but I did not like how he remained impassive while Hitler was doing mass murder. (4.5 stars)


message 6: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments It looks as though everyone had a good reading month, as far as quality goes. John, i found your comments about the first book, re. border of Bulgaria interesting. I wonder if that is unique or if many places could cite periodic flashpoints on certain borders.

Samanta, i liked your take on Mr. Penumbra's shop. Unfortunately i lost my notes on books i read in the first half of 2014, which included this one. Therefore, i can't recall how the book ended but i know i liked the book overall.

I'll post my own books read in July in a different post. Thanks for sharing your thoughts & titles.


message 7: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments The books i read for July are as follows:

The Keeper of Lost Things called to me because i am one who will pick up random lost items and save them. Usually i just see something artistic about the item but sometimes something else calls me. Author Ruth Hogan created a sweet book about a man who lost something important to him, so spent the rest of his life picking up lost items he finds. The story is told from two angles, although initially it's tough to tell--of course, you know the two lines will merge. ANYway, it was pleasant.

I read the above between reading chapters of How the Other Half Lives, the classic written by Jacob A. Riis. I began reading this in May, i think, hoping to quickly scratch off one book from my 2018 Determination List. As this is a rather small book, i thought it would be a breeze. Indeed, not. The chapters in much of the first half describe various neighborhoods into which various ethnic groups which had settled into NYC lived. Unfortunately, his prose created negative images of almost all ethnic people. Overall, it is a good book in the sense that he took the time. AND the photos he took are remarkable for giving insight into the immigrant community of the late 1800s.

Carys Davies novel, West is set in the early 19th century. A father of a 10 year old daughter leaves their Pennsylvania farm to try to find the mammoths he believes still live in the western parts of the US. The daughter is left on the farm with her aunt. While it's naturally tough to understand the dad's actions, it is still a good book, well written. It was 2 or 3 days after completing it that i realized a further development to the way the book ended. Duh.

What to say about Hope Never Dies by Andrew Shaffer? It was a fast mystery to read. The main characters are Joe Biden and Barack Obama--maybe that's all that needs saying. Not great but a fun way to look at them. I wouldn't read more of them if a series develops, though.

Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" was written by Zora Neale Hurston in the 1930s & 40s but never found a publisher because she refused to "translate" the book into "proper English", preferring to use his dialect. The story is of a survivor of the last slave ship, brought to the US illegally in 1860, just so the captain could prove it could still be done. The story covers Oluale Kossula, whose slave name was Cudjo Lewis, from his first 19 years in Africa to the end of his interviews with Hurston. The work has been edited by Deborah G Plant and includes notes about inaccuracies and assumptions made by the author and others. One of the values of his story is that he had a great memory about his African years, including his capture by the Dahomey warriors who sold fellow Africans as slaves. This is a good book.

The Banker’s Wife by Cristina Alger is a mystery i cannot say i liked but found interesting for the material i learned, if that makes sense. It wasn't hard to figure out most of the mystery but the explanations of the Swiss Banking uses & misuses was remarkable...and depressing, in many ways. Ripe for use by oligarchs and wealthy industrialists to hide tax money, etc. ALL the women were beautiful, the men handsome--perhaps that's part of such banking but it made for boring reading.

I saw William J. Barber II on political talk shows and decided to read his book The Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement. It helps me feel hopeful about our future, despite the present US executive administration. Much of the Tea Party agenda was brought to fruition in North Carolina from 2008-2016--purging voter registration, rejecting federal funds for programs which help those in lower income brackets and the demonizing of people who need help. Barber & other NC leaders created what they call a "fusion coalition" to wage battle against legislative proposals by creating Moral Mondays. Prior to the first event, those willing to be arrested by peaceful protests were trained. Arrested followed and the next week, more people protested and more arrests ensued. They were staking a claim while educating voters on what their elected representatives truly represented. The story, of course, is still unfolding but the book is a strong primer, imo.


message 8: by Petra (last edited Aug 01, 2018 05:39PM) (new)

Petra | 1047 comments Alias, that sounds like a good book. I enjoy books about people discovering new loves in life.

John, Border sounds like a good travelogue. Have you read The Great Hedge of India: The Search for the Living Barrier that Divided a People? It's also an interesting look at an area.

Samanta, that's a great selection of books. Your books are always so varied.

Madrano, I read Barracoon a couple months back. I liked it and thought the story was important but I wasn't enamored with it. His story was a difficult one because he was caught in the transition between slavery & freedom. Slavery changed his life and freedom didn't give it back to him.


message 9: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1047 comments I feel as if I didn't read much in July but I've got more books to post than I thought I would, so my perception seems off. :D

I finished the Cazalet family saga by reading the final 3 books: Confusion, Casting Off and All Change. I really enjoyed reading about this family. This saga went from pre-WWII to the mid-1950s. I had to read these books quickly and return them to the library.

I also read 2 books by Abbi Waxman: The Garden of Small Beginnings and Other People's Houses
I enjoyed the first (Small Beginnings) but not the second very much. The first was humorous and warm; the second was slow and repetitive.

The Windfall - I really enjoyed this story. The Jha family have struck it rich and have to adapt to a new lifestyle. Sudden Money can bring quick changes that take some time to allow one to get one's bearings. I liked the Jha family.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle - this was a reread (I listened to the audio this time). This is a fun, quirky, weird story. It's tightly told, every word matters. It's delightful.


message 10: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments John wrote: "I liked all three that I read:

Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe - author does a good job of proving her point that the border area of Bulgaria with Greece and Turkey has bee..."


Interesting books, John. They are all new to me. Thanks for sharing.


message 11: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Nice month, Deb.

I've heard about The Keeper of Lost Things. I'm glad to hear it's a winner. I'll have to check it out.


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Samanta wrote:
The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe by David I. Kertzer (no photo)
Genre: History
Review: This was one of those I've been postponing for ages but finally decided to stick to. I've found out many interesting things I did not know anything about. I was appalled to read some of Mussolini's quotes. He was a true dictator. I didn't particularly like Pope Pius XI. I thought him a tyrant, a bully, a spoiled brat and a narrow-minded dictator, something I never would have thought about a man who spent a large part of his life among books, but as he began to develop conscience (although too late), my scorn for him lessened. I have to read more about his successor, Pius XII, but I did not like how he remained impassive while Hitler was doing mass murder. (4.5 stars) "


This one sounds really interesting. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.


message 13: by Alias Reader (last edited Aug 01, 2018 06:48PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Petra wrote:
We Have Always Lived in the Castle - this was a reread (I listened to the audio this time). This is a fun, quirky, weird story. It's tightly told, every word matters. It's delightful. "


I thought I read this, but according to GR I have not. Maybe I bought it for the black hole that is my Kindle. I'll have to check it out.


message 14: by John (new)

John | 1203 comments Petra wrote: "Alias, that sounds like a good book. I enjoy books about people discovering new loves in life.

John, Border sounds like a good travelogue. Have you read [book:The Great Hedge of India: The Search..."


If I read the book, I do not recall it. So, it goes on to my TBR pile.


message 15: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Petra, that's a good way of putting the problem with Barracoon. Thank you, i intend to use it when talking with people about the book. :-)

You had a good reading month, Petra, but i'll bet reading those last three in the series made it seem as though you hadn't read as many books. I've done that myself, so eager am i to pursue the next book. Otherwise, you seem to have had a successful month of reading.

Like Alias, i thought i'd read the Shirley Jackson Castle book, too. So, i searched my list and see that i was confusing it with I Capture the Castle written by
Dodie Smith, who also wrote 101 Dalmatians. I should have guessed it was the wrong book from the cover shot of the Jackson novel--too dark!


message 16: by George (new)

George McNeese | 3 comments I didn’t read any books in July. Honestly, it’s been hard to find a book that can keep my attention for more than a chapter. I guess I’ve been spoiled by TV and movies. I can’teven remember the last book I read from beginning to end.


message 17: by John (new)

John | 1203 comments George wrote: "I didn’t read any books in July. Honestly, it’s been hard to find a book that can keep my attention for more than a chapter. I guess I’ve been spoiled by TV and movies. I can’teven remember the las..."

I hear you! I have been reading far less than I had been in the past.


message 18: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1047 comments Deb, the Shirley Jackson book isn't dark at all. It's kind of humorous and wacky. There are dark undertones but the story seems mostly light.


George & John, sometimes it's hard to find the time to read. The day flies by so quickly and is so filled with other things.


message 19: by Alias Reader (last edited Aug 04, 2018 05:47PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments I know I waste way too much time on nonsense Facebook.

That is why I am on the waiting list at the library for this book

Ten Arguments For Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now~~~~Jaron Lanier


message 20: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments LOL, Alias! I just replied to your other FB post. I'll add here that because i mostly followed people i knew and they seem to have stopped posting, it's been easier to withdraw from it. Even my family's genealogical page has slowed to random birthday wishes.

Petra, thanks for that additional info. I suppose i see the name--Shirley Jackson--and just think dark.

There are years when books just don't seem to call to me, either. For me, it's often that i've become distracted by things in my offline life, tv being a big culprit. Still, here's hoping you find worthy books soon.


message 21: by Andreia (last edited Aug 25, 2018 03:45AM) (new)

Andreia | 53 comments In July I read:


- A Ilustre Casa de Ramires/ The Illustrious House of Ramires, by Eça de Queirós – One of my favorite books by this author. Not so much for the chronicle of one of the ancestors of the main character, a bloodthirsty grandfather of the 12th century, but maninly for Gonçalo Mendes Ramires himself, an unsecure but generous nobleman in a candid and disinterested way. Out of ambition and lack of confidence in himself he ends up putting other people (like his sister) in trouble, but after some mishaps, he finally finds the strength necessary to take care of his destiny and give prestige again to the old house of the Ramires. The final comparison is brilliant! (5 stars)

- Os novos Maias/The New Maias, 3 volumes:
- 1st Os novos Maias by José Luís Peixoto, José Eduardo Agualusa (3 stars),
- 2nd Os novos Maias by Mário Zambujal, José Rentes de Carvalho (4 stars),
- 3rd Os novos Maias by Gonçalo M. Tavares, Clara Ferreira Alves (4 stars)

These three books are the result of a literary project. These six contemporary authors were challenged to continue the story of Eça de Queirós’ ‘The Maias’. Each author should invent the continuation of the story for a decade (or so), but they didn’t know how, or what, the other authors would write. The result is interesting, but not as good as the original masterpiece.
Some authors were more creative, others tried to write dialogues similar to the original’s. It was funny to see Carlos da Maia emigrating to Angola, and it was unexpected that Carlos da Maia lived long enough to see the begin of the Nazism and our dictatorial regime, for instance. My favourite was Gonçalo M. Tavares' version. It was an exigent challenge, and I enjoyed the result.

- A Cidade e as Serras/The City and the Mountains, by Eça de Queirós – This is the story of Jacinto, who lives in Paris, in a luxury apartment, surrounded by what he calls "the civilization" – all the books (the science) and all the technology of the 19th century (telephone, phonograph, and some less useful electric instruments to do the most ridiculous things). Everything a man needs and wants to have a comfortable life, full of knowledge, to be happy, in Jacinto's concept. Jacinto also has a very occupied social life. But, Jacinto is terribly bored… One day he must go to his ancestor’s village, in the north of Portugal, a place surrounded by mountains, because of some family issues. Jacinto engages an uncomfortable trip with is friend José Fernandes (the narrator), to Tormes. But something terrible happens, all the luggage (including the million books and technology) disappear during the train trip, and when Jacinto arrives to Tormes he must learn how to live with just one hairbrush, no comfortable furniture, no books, and so on. This book criticizes the city's empty life, and praises genuine life in the countryside. (5 stars)

Quote: ‘Yes, take the phonograph! Even the phonograph, Zé Fernandes, gives me a real sense of my superiority as a thinking being and distinguishes me from the beasts. Believe me, Zé Fernandes, there is only the City and nothing but the City!’

- Desperdício Zero/Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste, by Bea Johnson – Based on her experience, her life transformation, the author writes a guide for those who want to waste the least possible. The five principles are: to refuse – to reduce – to reuse – to recycle – to compost. For me, this book is a real inspiration, I’m already doing some of the things she suggests, and I hope I can do more, soon… (5 stars)

- Contos/Short Stories*, Eça de Queiroz – This is a compilation of all the short stories of Eça de Queirós, even the unfinished short stories. The thing about short stories is that they are short! 😊 So, not everyone can write good stuff in few words. Well, Eça could write whatever we wanted. Here there are really great stories like “A aia”/“The wet nurse”, “O defunto”/“Our Lady of Pillar”, “Singularidades de uma Rapariga Loira”/“The Idiosyncrasies of a Young Blonde Woman’, “O suave milagre”/“The sweet miracle”, “José Matías”, and many more.. (4 stars)

*I found several editions with individual short stories, others with some short stories, but not a complete compilation: The Wet Nurse, Our Lady of the Pillar, The Sweet Miracle, Alves and Co And Other Stories, The Mandarin and Other Stories.


message 22: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I only read one book this month but it was a winner. It took me longer than usual even though the book was under 300 pages. That was because I kept looking up all the various YouTube videos of the ..."

That book is very appealing to me. I love dancing. It seems that the author discovered that it's never too late to discover the passion for dance :)


message 23: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments John wrote: "I liked all three that I read:

Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe - author does a good job of proving her point that the border area of Bulgaria with Greece and Turkey has bee..."


Hi John! I think I would love to read "Insomniac City: New York, Oliver, and Me", as I loved the two books I read by Oliver Sacks, and it also seems a guide to the city.

The first book also seems very interesting.


message 24: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Andreia, it's great to see the titles and stories linked here. Thanks for this. Amidst the Eça de Queiroz titles, i see the organizing manual, which also calls to me. Tips from such authors have helped me weed down (& out) many of my unneeded items. Thanks for sharing with us.


message 25: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Andreia wrote: "That book is very appealing to me. I love dancing. It seems that the author discovered that it's never too late to discover the passion for dance :) ..."

I liked it so much I am listening to the audio now.

He mentions a lot of dance books throughout. So if you like dance books, your TBR will explode. :)


message 26: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Andreia wrote: "In July I read:


- A Ilustre Casa de Ramires/ The Illustrious House of Ramires, by Eça de Queirós – One of my favorite books by this author. Not so..."



Mostly 4 and 5 stars ! Congrats on a very nice reading month.


message 27: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments Madrano wrote: "Andreia, it's great to see the titles and stories linked here. Thanks for this. Amidst the Eça de Queiroz titles, i see the organizing manual, which also calls to me. Tips from such authors have he..."

Yes! I also need to get rid of a lot of things, from clothes to little gadgets and things that I never use (that I don't need)… And I should read more eBooks (for ecological reasons) but I’m not prepared to that change, yet…
What I really like in that book is the message that encourages us to have a simpler life. Having less things, means less time spent around those things (cleaning them, for example). It reminded me the movie “The fight club” and José Mujica’s (former president of Uruguay) ideals.


message 28: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Andreia wrote: "That book is very appealing to me. I love dancing. It seems that the author discovered that it's never too late to discover the passion for dance :) ..."

I liked it so much I am li..."


Someone said "so many books, so little time", isn't it?

:)


message 29: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments LOL--too true about so little time.

Neat link to the ideas behind Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. Despite all my reading about getting rid of items, etc., i never made that link but like it very much.

We've been going through every box we packed when we sold our house to go on the road. Much of what we shed were items given to us by others, which we held onto in case they visited. No more!

Our family donates our discarded goods to Salvation Army. When we delivered our last batch there it was a Thursday afternoon. There were THREE other cars there, none of which donated fewer than 3 boxes of stuff. Beginning of school year, i wonder? Prep for upcoming winter holidays? I was surprised at so many cars in less than a 5 minute time period. However, this is the third time we've dropped off boxes and Every Time there have been at least two other cars full of donations. Remarkable.


message 30: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments Madrano wrote: "LOL--too true about so little time.

Neat link to the ideas behind Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. Despite all my reading about getting rid of items, etc., i never made..."


That's a great solution, Deb, thanks for the suggestion! We’ve already given some furniture to an association, and clothes to another one, and I will look for others to give other things (house stuff). The use of medicines is something insane in Portugal. When we buy a medicine that we need, we can’t buy the amount that the doctor prescribes us because we must buy the pills in boxes, so we always waste medicines. Recently I discovered we can give them to the local (public) health centre, and they will give to poor people, when they are assisted there. I was thrilled, I never thought about it! The thing is that we don’t think about all the things we throw in the garbage.

I also discovered an interesting app, "I love olio", where we can give away food (and other goods) that we will not consume. Unfortunately, few people know this app in Portugal, yet. And there are other nice apps, like “ShareWaste”.

Little changes every day make the difference! 😊


message 31: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments When my father died (followed by some other elder family members deaths), we learned that in the US no one will accept unused medicine, not even health centers for the poor. Perhaps this is just about liability (we are a litigious nation, for certain!), but they couldn't accpet anything we had to offer. It's a pity because, as you may know, older people are often on a number of medications or have had to try many meds to find the one that works best for their bodies. The result is that we threw away many, many medications. The same was true when my brother-in-law died from cancer--no one could accept them.

Consider yourself lucky to have an outlet for them. It seems incredibly wasteful, imo.

I wasn't aware of ShareWaste but this sounds as though it would be another good resource. There are good ideas available but finding them is a challenge sometimes.


message 32: by Alias Reader (last edited Aug 27, 2018 10:03PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Madrano wrote: "When my father died (followed by some other elder family members deaths), we learned that in the US no one will accept unused medicine, not even health centers for the poor. Perhaps this is just ab..."

Perhaps that is why we have the problem of people flushing meds down the toilet. Now meds are showing up in the water supply.

Drugs in Our Drinking Water?
https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/f...

Of course you don't want to throw them in the garbage where children or animals may get to them.

I think pharmacies will take them and dispose of them properly.

I just googled and
here are the NYC rules and what to do if you can't find a drop off site.
https://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/67720...


message 33: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1047 comments Pharmacies take back all drugs, vitamins, drug supplies, etc. around here. I hate to think of them going into the water supply.

I always take any expired vitamins, drugs, etc to them. When my husband was on a syringed medication, we took the used needles & syringes back, too.
Any pharmacy will take meds from any other pharmacy. We don't have to go back to where we purchased them.


message 34: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments We were unable to find a pharmacy to take my dad's meds back in '12. I'd like to think that has changed but at the time no one seemed to care.

Alias, i think we mixed the meds with water, then put it in our trash, knowing data about drugs in water in US. I think my sister did the same with her husband's cancer drugs but am not sure. I know she explored many options.


message 35: by Andreia (new)

Andreia | 53 comments Deb, Alias and Petra, here we can take those meds to the pharmacies, too. And that's a good solution. But the ideal of "zero waste" would be to give those meds to someone who needs them. That way there is no waste, at all. And we help someone in need. Maybe contact associations who send meds to countries like Venezuela (some days ago I saw an interview about this) or others that need this kind of help.

It's a long way... but I think that each time we question ourselves and others (and the instituions they represent) about these kind of stuff, we are moving forward...


message 36: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1047 comments Andreia, I wish there were places that took and used medical supplies & drugs. When my husband was operated on, we needed to purchase some medical supplies for his aftercare. Frustratingly, supplies need to be purchased by the box or case. We knew we'd have many extra supplies at the end and asked whether we could donate the rest to someone who needed it. These supplies were individually wrapped, unopened and not expired (as well as in clean, pristine condition).
No one knew how to pass the supplies to someone who could have benefitted from them. It was a shame to throw them all out.

At work, my team & I look for 3rd World Organizations to donate used and well working medical equipment to when the hospital is disposing of items. It's a lot of work but very satisfying to know the items are not being junked.
We once could not find anyone to take 3 infant incubators. We found a Wildlife Rescue organization that was happy to have them for the birds. We still help them out when the incubators need to be looked at.


message 37: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18869 comments Petra wrote: We once could not find anyone to take 3 infant incubators. We found a Wildlife Rescue organization that was happy to have them for the birds. We still help them out when the incubators need to be looked at. .."

That is so awesome that you care and took the time and effort to put them to good use.

Maybe someone will come up with a website where people can donate big expensive items like you had so they don't go to waste.


message 38: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Petra and Andreia, you are setting a great example in pursuit of donating medical supplies. Thank you. I intend to pass this info along, as it's come up in other families we know. The idea of 3rd World nations benefiting is particularly rewarding.

Funny about the incubators being used for animals. It seems such a logical idea now that you mention it. When i had a stash of empty medicine containers i tried to find someone to recycle them for use, not just melting down. Pharmacies didn't want them back, stating law prohibited that. However, veterinarians had no such laws or qualms & our local vet took them all.


message 40: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11673 comments What a great reading month that was--all 4 or 5 stars and so many books read! First, let me state that if i read the number of books you have where the setting is "in the country" i would never want to live in the country! It's a real deterrent.

Secondly, this is the first i knew that the Loch Ness Monster eats people! Author Shea really puts those siblings through the wringer, judging by the second book you listed.


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