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The Miscellaneous Club > August 2018: Dogs

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message 1: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Jul 29, 2018 03:40PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
August 26 is National Dog Day, so in August the discussion will be about dog books: picture books, chapter books, non-fiction books, graphic novels, etc.

Picture book suggestions:
Yip! Snap! Yap! by Charles Fuge Ivan the Terrier by Peter Catalanotto Move Over, Rover! by Karen Beaumont The Detective Dog by Julia Donaldson Dogs by Emily Gravett

There are lots of chapter books. When I was younger, I could not get enough of Albert Payson Terhune's books, but I don't know how readily available they are any more, except perhaps:
Lad A Dog by Albert Payson Terhune
Some more:
Big Red (Big Red, #1) by Jim Kjelgaard Arf (Bowser and Birdie #2) by Spencer Quinn A Dog Like Daisy by Kristin O'Donnell Tubb Strudel's Forever Home by Martha Freeman

For graphic novels, Dog Man rules the roost at my library:
Dog Man (Dog Man, #1) by Dav Pilkey Dog Man Unleashed (Dog Man, #2) by Dav Pilkey Dog Man A Tale of Two Kitties (Dog Man, #3) by Dav Pilkey

There are lots of books about service and working dogs as well.
Paws of Courage True Tales of Heroic Dogs that Protect and Serve by Nancy Furstinger Tuesday Tucks Me In The Loyal Bond between a Soldier and his Service Dog by Luis Carlos Montalván Super Sniffers Dog Detectives on the Job by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent Poop Detectives Working Dogs in the Field by Ginger Wadsworth Ground Zero Dogs by Meish Goldish

Happy Reading!


message 2: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Woohoo! One of out favorite subjects to read about. My ADHD nephew liked This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne so much he had my dad read it twice. I thought it was a little weird.

Nephew also liked
Miss Moon Wise Words from a Dog Governess by Janet Hill

He is now into those DogMan books and at almost 6 starting to recognize sight words and understand the humor.

My grandmother, mom and I enjoyed the story about Muffin when we were small.
The Quiet Noisy Book by Margaret Wise Brown

Two Bobbies A True Story of Hurricane Katrina, Friendship, and Survival by Kirby Larson
is a touching and true story

My all-time new favorite dog book (because it's sooo true and made me miss our terrier)
Good Boy, Fergus! by David Shannon

but my Westie friends prefer
McDuff Moves In by Rosemary Wells

The Other Dog by Madeleine L'Engle
is a hilarious dogs-eye-view of what happens when the parents bring home a furless thing that moves on all 4s but doesn't bark...

Obviously we can't forget
The Pokey Little Puppy by Janette Sebring Lowrey
my first favorite dog book

There are children's books about Marley, the world's worst dog. I did not enjoy the adult version except as an example of what not to do and the obvious ending was too tough to read at that time.

For older readers

Rocky The World's Greatest Cookbook Salesman by Deirdre Bailleu
was published by the terrier rescue group I follow. I plan to read it to the nieces and nephews soon.

Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo is a must-read. It nearly made me cry.

I remember an elementary school teacher reading us
Sounder by William H. Armstrong
I don't know if it holds up but it was excellent and made the girls cry.

I did not enjoy
Along Came a Dog by Meindert DeJong
It's slow and strange. I didn't like the chickens at all.

I also wasn't crazy about
The Underneath by Kathi Appelt
again too slow and kind of sad

Same with
A Dog's Life The Autobiography of a Stray (Scholastic Gold) by Ann M. Martin

Broadway Tails Heartfelt Stories of Rescued Dogs Who Became Showbiz Superstars by Bill Berloni
is a good read aloud for families if the adults edit a bit of the extraneous filler material and maybe some of the more tragic bits.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
This will be an especially interesting month for me. I think dogs can be interesting, and very much enjoyed the newish adult NF, The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter than You Think. And I loved The Underneath, and I confidently expect to enjoy Along Came a Dog.

But I don't read 'dog stories' and am not sentimental about them. I did come across a couple of picture-books at the library this evening, so we'll see... maybe my 'outsiders' opinion will be worth two cents to someone. ;)


message 4: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob) (jenisnotabooksnob) | 170 comments I have not read any of these recently, but, I definitely was obsessed with dog books. These were some chapter books I loved as a kid.


Irish Red
Big Red
White Fang
The Call of the Wild
Champion Dog: Prince Tom
Larry of Snowy Ridge


message 5: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
Not a huge dog fan, but have indeed read more than a couple of pretty good dog-themed books over the years, both picture books and novels.

NOVELS

Follow My Leader, lovely book set in the 1950s about a young boy who is blinded by a firecracker accident and then gets a guid dog, named Leader. Although at times a bit dated, I have always loved that this novel has never been updated and that we thus see Jimmy and Leader through the lens of the 1950s (and I guess the only major issue I have always had with the storyline is that sometimes, it does feel as though Jimmy both learns braille at lightning speed and then later learns how to train and deal with his guide dog a bit overly fast for my tastes).

As a contrast, I offer Guelph Ontario's Jean Little's memoir about getting and training her first guide dog, Stars Come Out Within, which shows how difficult a job this is for both the dog and for the person receiving the dog (and that Jean Little once she got home with her guide dog almost ended up having to return him as she was having some major issues trying to control him and having him completely listen to her).

Now perhaps those of you who really love dogs might not appreciate how Judy Blume has depicted both Jennifer the dog and Sheila's reaction to her in Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great. But although Sheila has never been amongst my favourite Judy Blume characters, I do very much appreciate that Blume shows Sheila's fears of dogs as being legitimate and not something simply to laugh at, that she should not automatically have to love and be appreciative of Jennifer and that being afraid of dogs and not liking dogs is not some terrible thing.

And sometimes, a dog can just be a fun supportive character, like in one of my favourite teenager-hood novels, Me and the Terrible Two, where Dorrie's dog Sherman is of course not the main character by any stretch of the imagination but is kind of essential for moving the plot along (especially with regard to Dorrie's reaction and interaction with her two new neighbours, twins Haskell and Conrad, the by her named "terrible two" of the title).

Now finally, who can forget the both sweet and heartbreaking story of a boy and his two dogs, as related in Where the Red Fern Grows, one of the first novels that ever made me cry (but also a novel that as an adult I no longer really like to read all that much simply because of the emphasis and celebration on hunting, the constant level of destruction and doom and that if the young boy had not been so keen on hunting and hunting some more, perhaps his two dogs would not even have died).


message 6: by Manybooks (last edited Jul 31, 2018 05:44PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
Now a pretty decent picture book about a guide dog is My Buddy, even though I do find the very easy acceptance of Buddy at his young owner's school a bit too fanciful and optimistic and I for one would have preferred to have also seen portrayed some issues that needed dealing with (such as perhaps a classmate trying to feed or pet Buddy whilst he was working or perhaps a scenario where either a teacher or a fellow student had a fear of dogs or serious allergies, as while I really do love the book, the almost ridiculously easy manner in which Buddy is accepted at school and everything falls into place, I do find a bit too sweet and hard to believe).

And to go on, while I have indeed loved reading about how Isabel and Martin Springett's Great Dane Kate adopted a fawn and mothered it (and even though the pictures are lovely and delightfully sweet), I for one have always felt very much uncomfortable with the entire premise of both Kate & Pippin: An Unlikely Love Story and Kate & Pippin's Family: The Unlikely Love Story Continues, simply because it has always felt to me as though Pippin was perhaps and even likely abandoned by her mother because Isabel Springett probably got too close to the fawn and caused the mother doe to abandon her (as some of the earliest photographs pf Pippin as a newborn in the Springetts' back yard look like Isabel must have been right in the fawn's face, and if she in any way got to close or worse touched the fawn the doe likely would abandon the fawn as the fawn would smell of humans and thus be dangerous)..


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
I picked up Strongheart: The World's First Movie Star Dog and enjoyed it quite a bit. The illustrations did a good job of portraying some of the culture of the setting of the early 1920s. And the author's note did cite references. Now, I'm not quite convinced that any dog could be quite that amazing... but I do accept that this German Shepherd was an amazing dog.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
I also picked up Painter and Ugly. I found it disappointing. Only the initial premise is a true story, according to the author's note. The rest is implausible. The author did do on-site research, but still the race, the training, the climate... nothing comes alive. Rounded up from 2.5 stars for the pictures.


message 9: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
For those of you who appreciate Rottweilers or would like to read a fun and quirky nearly wordless series of picture books about a lovable and in no way threatening Rottweiler, Alexandra Day's Carl the Rottweiler series is totally fun.

And for me (because we had Rottweilers as family pets when I was a child), the series is also sweetly nostalgic, although I do admit that I have liked the later books in the series better than the first book. So far, I have read the following Carl books.

Good Dog, Carl (the original, but I was only mildly amused as the story is a bit too far fetched for my tastes and the pictures not nearly as expressive as some of the later books on Carl I have enjoyed)

Carl's Summer Vacation (very cute and sweet)

Carl's Snowy Afternoon (loved the hotdogs being nabbed although I know this bothers some)

Carl's Birthday (my favourite picture is of Carl draped over the mother's lap, as our Rottweiler Kipper always did that as well)

Carl Makes a Scrapbook (did not like this, confusing and the storyline really fizzled)

Many other Carl books still to read and check out!


message 10: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Those Carl books are popular! I haven't read them but I've seen them around at bookstores and libraries. I'm going to the library tomorrow to find some good dog books.


message 11: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Those Carl books are popular! I haven't read them but I've seen them around at bookstores and libraries. I'm going to the library tomorrow to find some good dog books."

If you want to try the Carl books, the later ones seem to have better illustrations.


message 12: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments The library has a TON of dog books. I looked through some that caught my eye with either cute/nice illustrations, cute titles or multicultural themes.

Carl's Snowy Afternoon- This is a cute nearly wordless story. It looks like a fun day! The illustrations are beautiful but a bit too realistic for my personal preference. I like cute, goofy dogs.

Alfred's Nose- AWW!! This photo story about a French Bulldog (a great sport putting up with what his people made him wear) who hates his face. His nose is funny and his tongue sticks out. Alfred tries on a bunch of new looks before he discovers the message of the story, Aldred is so absolutely adorable the way he is! I wanted an Alfred kiss. I liked the message about loving yourself the way you are.

Bark, George This is a very very simple book to teach babies animal noises. Poor George says everything except bark! His human takes him to he vet and the sequence that follows is cute and silly. The last page made me chuckle out loud. This one is best for toddlers and seems to be popular judging from the condition of the book.

Dog Day Another simple book for small children. It's almost comic style and quite silly. Not my favorite.

My city is largely populated by people of color and the library has a large Spanish language section. I chose to read The Dog Who Loved Tortillas / La perrita que le encantaban las tortillas (A Little Diego Book) because it's bilingual. The Spanish is a bit too difficult for me (I flipped through others I could read easily) but the English is appropriate for older young children who can sit through a longer picture book. This book teaches kids lessons about sharing, adopting a dog, how to care for and train the puppy, and importantly a dog is NOT something you give away like an object. The story is sweet. I liked the fact that the dog's favorite treat is tortillas! My problem with this book is the illustrations. What the heck was this person thinking? The illustrations are photographs of people and objects made out of modeling clay. The people are in no way realistic. The children look old and unattractive. The dog is cute enough. The objects don't look well made. I think my 9 year old niece can do better.

The Dog Who Loved the Moon Another Spanish/English book. This one is mostly in English with a few Spanish words thrown in. The family just happens to be Spanish speaking and brown. Pilar, the little girl in the story, gets two things for her birthday : pink dancing shoes (zapatillas) and a puppy (un perrito). Pilar names the puppy after her favorite Tio who plays the congo drums Pilar loves to dance to. At first Pilar and Paco become the best of friends. Pilar teaches Paco to dance. One day Paco stops dancing and starts whining at the moon! What could be wrong with Paco?

This is by far my favorite dog book I read today. It is an adorable story. You have to sort of not think about it, just go with the cuteness. I love the illustrations. They help explain some of the Spanish words like leche (milk). Pilar and Paco are pretty cute. I absolutely love the vibrant, colorful, tropical neighborhood Pilar's family lives in. Mama makes pineapple cake so they must be from somewhere tropical. The author is originally from Cuba so I'm guessing this is a Cuban or Cuban-American family. I brought this book home for my nieces and nephews.

Next up:
Wiggens Learns His Manners at the Four Seasons Restaurant- I flipped through this and nearly laughed out loud. It's a parody of stereotypical New York City behavior with dogs as the people. It teaches lessons about behavior and etiquette (for dogs) that children will pick up on and hopefully adopt.


message 13: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Smells Like Dog

Chunky kid Homer Pudding lives on a goat farm with his parents and siblings. His sister dreams of being the Royal Taxidermist at the Museum of Natural History in The City where the Pudding children are forbidden to go. Homer has big dreams too. He wants to be an explorer and discover treasure like his Uncle Drake. Other kids in Muddyville laugh at him for his dreams and for not being athletic. Homer's Dad thinks The City is too dangerous and the kids should stay on the farm and raise goats. Homer is crushed to learn of his uncle's untimely demise in The City. When Uncle Drake leaves Homer his most prized possession, Homer's life changes forever. Uncle Drake left Homer a Basset Hound with no sense of smell and a mysterious gold coin attached to his collar. Then Homer receives an invitation to a mysterious VIP party at the Museum of Natural History, he seizes his chance to find out what happened to his uncle's maps and books and what the gold coin means.

This book was on display in the children's room of the local city library. It can best be described as being in the style of Roald Dahl, Lemony Snicket and J.K. Rowling with a dash of steampunk. It's unusual and messy but the plot is so exciting I could not put the book down. This book is best recommended for kids 12 and under. It would be a good read aloud for a young child who can handle the mild peril sequences. The story has a strong moral about right vs. wrong at the end.

As Homer falls in love with Dog, the reader will too. Dog is certainly a memorable character. He is quite endearing and quirky. Clever readers will figure out the mystery of Dog quickly, long before Homer does. I love that Dog is a dog with a disability and that sends a message to kids about compassion. (There's also a human character with a genetic mutation that makes her different).

Uncle Drake seems to have been a fun and unusual man. His choice of companions is a little odd and unusual, like himself. He's the only adult who nurtured Homer's dreams. Uncle Drake saw the potential in Dog even when no one else did.

I stayed up too late reading this book and woke up too early to finish it yet I didn't really love it. It combines the well known formula with steampunk which doesn't quite work and also adds in too much about goat farming. The writing just doesn't have the depth of the classic authors but this book is worth a read for young readers who may not be ready yet for the complicated, sophisticate ASOUE or the darkness of Harry Potter.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
I think I'll look for this; despite flaws, it sounds like a enjoyable read.


message 15: by QNPoohBear (last edited Aug 08, 2018 05:56PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Cheryl I did enjoy the story of Homer and Dog despite the clueless adults. If you like Roald Dahl you will probably enjoy this one too but it's mostly appropriate for kids under 12. I think my nephews would like this if they could sit still long enough to read it. Maybe when they're older. One is a boy with a dog and the other wants a dog.

Does anyone have recommendations for books that teach kids what owning a dog is really like? My sister's kids are dying for a dog. She has the worst track record with pets and I would like them to know how hard dogs are to take care of.

Wiggens Learns His Manners at the Four Seasons Restaurant
This book can best be described in one sentence: Puppies learn manners at the Four Seasons Restaurant in New York City. This charming little picture book has a narrative about a naughty Labrador puppy whose parents send him to The Four Seasons to learn manners. There are also etiquette tips for puppies. Human children will get a kick out of the naughty puppy and learn manners at the same time. Beginning readers will be able to read the narrative but not the etiquette tips since they are written in cursive. The story isn't really for that age group anyway.

The illustrations are delightful. Nary a human in site, this New York has gone to the dogs- literally! The dog people show off the stereotypes of New York behavior but also what happens behind-the-scenes in the kitchen. I'm glad I brought this home. I know one little boy who REALLY could benefit from reading this.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
Smasher is a bull mastiff born to a collie on a farm. He's full of energy, clumsy, and large, and gets into quite a bit of mischief.

This very short chapter book will show children how hard it is to take care of a large puppy, even when one has plenty of space, but I don't know if it has a clear message about the care all dogs deserve.


message 17: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Manybooks wrote: "For those of you who appreciate Rottweilers or would like to read a fun and quirky nearly wordless series of picture books about a lovable and in no way threatening Rottweiler, Alexandra Day's Carl..."

I have also greatly enjoyed reading the Carl books over the years.


message 18: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Manybooks wrote: "For those of you who appreciate Rottweilers or would like to read a fun and quirky nearly wordless series of picture books about a lovable and in no way threatening Rottweiler, Al..."

Yes they are fun and also show that a well loved and well looked after Rottweiler can be a great family dog.


message 19: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
A Dog Named Doug by Karma Wilson
A Dog Named Doug by Karma Wilson
This is a new picture book at our library. I found it to be a hoot. This dog Doug digs, and boy, the holes he digs! I think young children will also find it quite funny, especially with all the words with "d" and "g" in them.


message 20: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
The Great Puppy Invasion by Alastair Heim
The Great Puppy Invasion by Alastair Heim

Another book I spied on our library shelf. This one was too cute for words, and illustrations were adorable, almost Disney-esque. All the puppies had BIG eyes! Anyway, the little cuties invade a town where no fun is allowed, and turn that town upside down.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
The Old Dog dies right away.
I only gave the book two stars. My review:

Not sure about getting a new dog so soon, and not sure about the illustrations by James Ransome. Just too brief. No idea who the target audience would be.

So, I've never had a pet (my family had cats when I was little but they weren't particular to anybody). So I don't know. But it seems to me that if you have a pet that is getting old or sick, it'd be smart to go to the shelter and pick out another that's sort of a companion to it, and that will eventually be your friend to comfort you when the first one dies. Does this make sense?


message 22: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7674 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "The Old Dog dies right away.
I only gave the book two stars. My review:

Not sure about getting a new dog so soon, and not sure about the illustrations by James Ransome. Just too brie..."


That's an interesting suggestion, Cheryl, and one that I not only believe but that could even prolong the older dog's life. When our Rottweiler was about nine years old (and getting sore etc. with typical large dog health issues), two young stray dogs appeared one weekend at our farm. Now of course, my parents originally wanted to take the two dogs to the SPCA on Monday as one large dog was enough, but by Sunday night, my sister had named both dogs and thus, they stayed. And they totally rejuvenated the Rottweiler who absolutely loved being father figure, being "top dog" and having the two strays imitate and follow him (including into porcupines and skunks, alas).


message 23: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "The Old Dog dies right away.
I only gave the book two stars. My review:

Not sure about getting a new dog so soon, and not sure about the illustrations by James Ransome. Just too brie..."


I agree, I think your suggestion makes a great deal of sense; and it may even be a help to the elderly animal as Manybooks points out.


message 24: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte (charlotte_riggle) | 93 comments I absolutely adore Hello Goodbye Dog. It's about a dog who loves to say hello and hates to say goodbye and will do anything to be with the girl he adores. The girl is biracial and uses a wheelchair, which is wonderful to see -- especially since this is not an issue book. It's not about race or about disability. It's about the girl and her dog. And it's beautiful. I'd love to see it in every school library and every children's book collection everywhere!


message 25: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Charlotte wrote: "I absolutely adore Hello Goodbye Dog. It's about a dog who loves to say hello and hates to say goodbye and will do anything to be with the girl he adores. The girl is biracial and u..."

I read this book in August a year ago. I don't remember it very well, but I gave it 4 stars, so I must have liked it!


message 26: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments I wanted to read Hello Goodbye Dog but didn't have time or couldn't find it on the shelves at the library. It looked cute.

About getting a new dog before the old one dies- most people don't. By the time the dog is old the kids are grown and the parents don't want another one. Some couples who start with a dog and move on to kids will have more than one at once. Dogs grieve too though so it doesn't necessary help to have another one at the same time. There's NEVER enough time even when they're almost 17 or 18 or 20... It still breaks your heart no matter how old you are.


message 27: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Made for Each Other: Why Dogs and People Are Perfect Partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
Made for Each Other Why Dogs and People Are Perfect Partners by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

This is a really good book about dogs' relationships to humans and vice versa, and dog behavior for upper elementary age children. It is illustrated with clear, colorful photos and charts. The author includes a bibliography, videography, list of websites, and source notes.


message 28: by Elspeth (new)

Elspeth Hall (elspeth_grace) | 141 comments I quite liked The Call of the Wild, White Fang and Other Stories when I was younger.

Picture book wise Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy and the whole Maclary series are just brilliant I especially love Hairy Maclary SIT!

Greyfriars Bobby andThe Dog on the Tuckerboxand Red Dog are all beautiful tales of a dogs loyalty.
I don't know the truth of the Australian stories but Greyfriers Bobby did exist, his licence was paid for by various members of high society and the local cafes fed him. His collar is kept in a museum in Edinburgh I believe.
I have read both versions of the story and the only real difference is the life he led before his master was killed. (2 men of the same name were buried in Greyfriars kirk within a week of each other hence the uncertainty.) Personally I think the version where he was a shepherds dog more likely as if he were the night watchman's mascot someone would have come to claim him. but the mut of a penniless farm hand.....


message 29: by Elspeth (new)

Elspeth Hall (elspeth_grace) | 141 comments My husband (who was living in Australia at the time) assures me that red dog was real he remembers reading about him in the papers.


message 30: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Wiggens Learns His Manners at the Four Seasons Restaurant was a hit with the small boy. He smiled a lot because Wiggens reminded him of his own sometimes naughty doggie. The Dog Who Loved the Moon needs to be read by someone familiar with Spanish. The kids couldn't read that on their own.

I read Greyfriars Bobby (I believe it was this one by Atkinson) awhile ago. I am mostly familiar with the Disney movie and the remake. Bobby was a Skye terrier in the version I remember. We liked the movie because Bobby looked a lot like our own beloved terrier.


message 31: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Pig the Pug A funny little rhyming book about a Pug who won't share his toys with his "weiner dog" brother. The illustrations are comical and the story is funny. It would best appeal to very young kids and dog lovers who have more than one dog. Maybe read it to your dogs and see if they understand the message?!

Hands down the best dog book I read this month is Rescue & Jessica: A Life-Changing Friendship. This is a story about Rescue, a service dog and Jessica, the girl who loves him. Inspired by true events, Jessica and her husband both became amputees after the Boston Marathon bombing, this is a great, heartwarming story. The book is fiction and makes Jessica a teenager. Rescue is in training to be a seeing eye dog but doesn't make the cut. His trainer suggests he train to be a service dog. Rescue doesn't know what that means and he's nervous about not living up to the important name he was given. Jessica is frustrated by the loss of part of her leg. She's worried about trying to live a normal life. Told from the point-of-view of the dog and the human, this is a sweet story for kids and adults.

The illustrations are beautiful and realistic. They show Jessica's prosthetic leg as something normal and show how she gets around. The Boston clues come in towards the end when I spotted Jessica wearing a blue hat with the signature red B and I recognized Boston behind her.

I hadn't heard this story, surprisingly. I'm not sure why. Everyone here knows someone who knows someone who worked with someone who was at the marathon that day.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Rescue & Jessica will benefit NEADS, National Education for Assistance Dog Services, a non-profit organization that was established in 1976 and based in Princeton, Massachusetts. "Their Service Dogs become an extension of their handlers and bring freedom, physical autonomy and relief from social isolation to their human partners who are deaf or have a disability. "

Illustrator website with behind the scenes content and sample illustrations.

This book is a must read to introduce children to the concept of disabilities, how to understand what that means and how people cope.


message 32: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Pig the Pug A funny little rhyming book about a Pug who won't share his toys with his "weiner dog" brother. The illustrations are comical and the story is funny. It would best appea..."

Rescue & Jessica sounds very good. Our library system owns several copies, so I will be requesting it.


message 33: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Rescue & Jessica
I agree with QNPoohBear's assessment and review of this book. Lovely, touching story with very nice, digital illustrations.


message 34: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments A Dog Wearing Shoes
I really did not like this story. Mini is a horrid, bratty child. I didn't like how she kept hugging the dog. I'm constantly reminding my nephews NOT to hug the doggie! Dogs don't hug. If the dog is raised with children from puppyhood they may put up with it but don't let your kid hug a strange dog! That's just common sense. The mother also lacked common sense in searching for an owner for the dog. She suspects the dog has an owner but her bratty kid won't give the dog up.

The illustrations are weird. I didn't like the bug eyed style or the black and white drawings. I get why they're black and white so the pop of color in the dog's shoes shoes attracts attention but it wasn't attractive to me. I also really liked the how to adopt a pet note in the back of the book.


message 35: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Elsie Mae Has Something to Say features a lovable and memorable dog Huck. He's mischievous, loving and loyal with a very special talent. Unfortunately, I found his human companion, Essie Mae, insanely annoying. She is bratty, proud deliberately disobeys her elders, bullies her cousin and rushes into danger. She of course learns a lesson at the end but I thought the lesson was artificial. The things that happened as a consequence didn't have anything to do with her!

The local color of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia is incredible! The author brought to life the customs and speech of a way of life that is long gone.


message 36: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Oct 04, 2020 03:25PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector by Andy Hirsch
This is a graphic non-fiction book for middle grades and teens. The illustration style is cartoon, and the book is narrated by a cartoon terrier type dog. Interestingly enough, this book goes into GREAT detail about DNA, alleles, genes, and chromosomes in explaining how traits are passed from parents to offspring. It also includes scientific info on sight, smell, and hearing as related to dog senses. Natural selection and selective breeding are also discussed. I would challenge anyone to say that this "comic book" is not "real reading." (There are some parents who do not think that graphic novels and comic books are "real reading").


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector by Andy Hirsch
This is a graphic non-fiction book for middle grades and teens. The illustration style is cartoon, a..."


Sounds like a great *real* read!


message 38: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
The Dog Encyclopedia for Kids
The Dog Encyclopedia for Kids by Merriam Garcia
I did not read every word in this book, but it is a good introduction to many dog breeds for children who love dogs.
It begins with a brief history of domesticated dogs, then the bulk of the book is dog breeds by category (herding, working, toy, etc.). Each category includes between 8 and 10 breeds, with short info on appearance, behavior, and breed history. Each entry also features fairly large photos of an adult dog and a puppy of each breed. Following that are a couple of pages of "Additional Breeds in the Group", with very short paragraphs on each and photos of 2-3 of the dogs featured. The book ends with a couple of pages on "Dog Care," a glossary, a brief bibliography, and an index. The book is probably aimed at students in grades 3 - 5, and will give them an idea of the many dog breeds in the world.


message 39: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Beverly wrote: "The Dog Encyclopedia for Kids
The Dog Encyclopedia for Kids by Merriam Garcia
I did not read every word in this book, but it is a good introduction to many dog breeds for childre..."


Do Cairn Terriers fall under "additional breeds in this group"? That would make me drop my rating considerably. Dad and I hate it when they get cut out from dog shows. I also hate it when all they have to say is "Toto from the Wizard of Oz".


message 40: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
QNPoohBear wrote: "Do Cairn Terriers fall under "additional breeds in this group"?..."

I'm sorry, I already returned the book to the library, so I cannot check on that. However, I can tell you that the breed categories are not exhaustive and mostly include the most well-known breeds; although a few of the lesser known breeds are also included.


message 41: by Celia (last edited May 15, 2022 01:35PM) (new)

Celia Buell (celiafutureteacher) | 44 comments I worked with a first grade girl who loved dog books in a tutoring program for one of my classes for my reading endorsement. She made so many connections to her own dog throughout all of the books. We read:

Gretchen The Bicycle Dog by Anita Heyman Gretchen The Bicycle Dog by Anita Heyman - this is the true story of a dachshund who had to be fitted for a cart. Told from the dog's perspective, this is a fun book that looks at disability and assistance as empowerment. It's also a true story, which gives kids a good first look at creative nonfiction. Read my full review here.

The Poodle Who Barked at the Wind by Charlotte Zolotow The Poodle Who Barked at the Wind by Charlotte Zolotow is an old favorite from when I was a kid (which I liked mostly because the dog looked exactly like my first dog at that age). A dog who always barks, suddenly doesn't when most of the family goes out, and the father (who works from home) can't concentrate because, for once, the dog isn't barking. This is a sweet realistic fiction story, which is probably even more relatable now since everyone's been working from home with the pandemic. As an adult, I do wish the characters had decided to work with training for consistent barking at the end, or at least that the book had an end note about training, as I know this can be a problem. Read my full review here.

Tiger Pups by Tom Harvey Tiger Pups by Tom Harvey and Allie Harvey is a true story of three tigers from a Kansas wildlife park who were abandoned by their mother and adopted by a nursing golden retriever that the authors and owners of the wildlife park owned. I first read this book back in 2017 or 2018 with a student who wanted to read it again and again. It's a great exploration of animal friendships across species, and a good look at how animals can provide for the needs of others outside their own species. Though the first student I worked with and the student I worked with recently were about the same age, the student I worked with recently had more difficulty grasping the concepts of this book than she did for some of the other books. I think it can be a little much for children to comprehend if they haven't thought about interspecies friendships before, or if they don't have some base scientific knowledge of what animals need.


Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish (cherylllr) | 6441 comments Mod
Oh my gosh those all three sound wonderful!


message 43: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1806 comments Cheryl has hopes her life will calm down soonish wrote: "Oh my gosh those all three sound wonderful!"

Yes! I love dogs and haven't read any of these before.


message 44: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
Tiger Pups sounds very good, and I was able to put a hold on a copy from my library.


message 45: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2475 comments Mod
I received the library copy of Tiger Pups and read it. What a wonderful story!


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