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Challenges: Monthly > August 2018 Challenge - Kids, Eat Your Vegetables

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message 1: by Janice, Moderator (last edited Jul 28, 2018 07:42AM) (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments August 2018 Challenge – Kids, Eat Your Vegetables


National Sweet Corn Week occurs the end of August. In recognition of that event, our challenge for August will be to read a book related to vegetables. You may choose one of the following options:

- Read a book in which a vegetable is in the title. (eg Children of the Corn, The Beet Queen)
- Read a book where the author’s name is a vegetable (eg 101 Nights of Grrreat Sex by Laura Corn)
- Read a book where a vegetable is prominently visible on the cover and easily identified. Don’t make me squint or cross my eyes trying to see it.
eg Tomato Rhapsody A Fable of Love, Lust & Forbidden Fruit by Adam Schell

Rule of thumb - What is a vegetable? Google the definition of the word you want to use and if vegetable isn't mentioned in the generic dictionary, or a reputed dictionary like Mirriam-Bradley, you've answered your own question. :)


General Rules:

1. The book may be in any format - paperback, ebook, audiobook.
2. The book may be in any genre.
3. The book may NOT be combined with the Year Long Challenge.
4. The book must be read between August 1 – August 30, 2018 (based on your local time zone).
5. The challenge is for one book. You may read more books if you chose.
6. The book must be 175 pages or more determined by the issue you read. If reading an audiobook or ebook, page numbers will be determined by the hardcover issue. If there is no hardcover, then paperback issue. Where there are more than one editions, the one with the highest number of ratings will be used.

Scoring:

Title: - sub-titles are not included

5 pts – Contains a word that is 8 letters long (August is the 8th month of the year).
4 pts – Contains the proper name of a person.
3 pts – Is exactly 3 words long (includes a, an, the, etc).
2 pts – Has a word that begins with the letter “a” (excluding a, an).
1 pts – Has a hyphenated word in it.

Cover: (based on the edition you read)

5 pts – Has a farm house on it. Must be easily seen and identified.
4 pts – Is 75% the colour of corn - yellow.
3 pts – Is 75% the colour of tomatoes - red.
2 pts – is 75% the colour of celery – light green.
1 pts – Has the author’s name across the bottom.

Author:

5 pts – The author’s last name begins with the letter C, O, R, or N. In the case of the author having two last names, go with the first listed. In the case of more than one author it applies to either author. Does not apply to an anthology.
4 pts – Was born in or resides in Germany, Austria, or Poland.
3 pts – Is not a Goodreads author.
2 pts – Is a baby boomer (born between 1946 and 1964).
1 pts – Is male.

Genre: - must be listed on the book’s main page

5 pts – Historical Fiction
4 pts – Science Fiction
3 pts – Steam Punk
2 pts – Horror
1 pts – Mystery

Pages: - based on the edition you read. See general Rules about ebooks, audiobooks.

5 pts – 500 +
4 pts – 400 to 499
3 pts – 300 to 399
2 pts – 200 to 299
1 pts – 175 to 199

Bonus Points:

What Will Be Your Legacy Day: If a significant character is over 60 years old - take 3 points

World Breastfeeding Week: If there is a baby in the story aged 2 or under (not just a mention), take 3 points

Chuckwagon Races: If there are horses mentioned in the story, take 3 points.

Mead Day (in honour of my friend who makes mead): If there are bees, honey, or mead mentioned in the story; or bees are shown on the cover, take 3 points.

A reporting thread will be set up to report the book you’ve read, and the score you obtained. Happy reading.


message 2: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments Oh, interesting! Definitely need to gopher for this one. :)


message 3: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments I love veggies! Great challenge!

I'll have to gopher too. Nothing comes to mind right away.


message 4: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9571 comments Interesting! I also have to gopher.


message 5: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments A quick look through my tbr and I came up with one book that I own, but it's the 9th in a series. Luck is on my side for once, as I read the 8th a few months ago.

Also, it has a veg in the title AND on the cover. Bonus points for that Janice? ;-)

So I think I'll read Carrot Cake Murder. It's quick and easy, so perfect to read while on holiday.


message 6: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments It also looks to be tomato red in colour. Might want to check it against tineye.


message 7: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments Yes, it's kind of dark red but could also be sort of brownish? There's also an orange edition, I'd have to check my ereader to see mine. I think orange. If it's the reddish one I'll ask tineye.


message 8: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9571 comments CARROT CAKE MURDER and CANDY CORN MURDER are the two Overdrive has to offer me right now.


message 9: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments The first thing that came to mind was Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe, but I've already read it. I figured I'd just put it here as a possibility for anyone else that's interested in it.


message 10: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments I found a couple of Goodreads list too that might help. You'll have to check for validity and page length. I saw some that don't fit and plenty of picture books, but you still might get an idea out of it.

fruits and vegetables in titles
Books with Vegetables in the Title


message 11: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 20275 comments Kristie wrote: "The first thing that came to mind was Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe, but I've already read it. I figured I'd just put it here as a possibility for anyone else that's int..."

That one came to mind for me too, Kristie, but like you, I have already read it - multiple times actually.

I will have to gopher. I think I might have a Bean Tree book that I have never read yet.


message 12: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9571 comments I also thought of FRIED GREEN TOMATOS, and also came to mind THE GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. (Sorry, in the app)


message 13: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments I was just looking at The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, Sandra. I completely forgot they are root vegetables. I always think of potatoes as starch, carb, or root, not vegetable, so I looked it up and was reminded.


message 14: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 20275 comments Ah, the Pigs in Heaven ate my The Bean Trees book.

Janice - will you take olives for a vegetable? If yes, I might finally get around to reading Olive Kitteridge.


message 15: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments I also read The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper, which was cute.

I may go with The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society because I already own it.

A weird tidbit about The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, when I went to add it as a link it popped up with several different versions with several different authors. The first page has Mary Ann Shaffer, Laure Chevalier, Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows, Aymerick Sieben, and Casia Lisa. So weird. The version I have says Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows, but not in the cover that showed up with their names.


message 16: by Jenn (new)

Jenn | 2316 comments I think I'm going to assault my senses with State of the Onion, which would rack up a whopping 7 pts :)


message 17: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments My first thought was also Fried Green Tomatoes but I've read it too. Guernsey and Arthur Pepper too.

Thanks for the lists, I'm going to check them out.


message 18: by Lanelle (new)

Lanelle | 3205 comments I've wanted to read Onion John and Five Little Peppers and How They Grew for a long time. I also have The Watermelon King. I'll probably read one of those.


message 19: by Debra (new)

Debra (debra_t) | 6542 comments Based on Kristie's experience, I might give The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper a try. Backup plan is The Beet Queen.


message 20: by Anna (new)

Anna Kļaviņa (annamatsuyama) | 1098 comments The first book that comes to mind is The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales


message 21: by Cherie (last edited Jul 27, 2018 03:09PM) (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 20275 comments Lanelle wrote: "I've wanted to read Onion John and Five Little Peppers and How They Grew for a long time. I also have The Watermelon King. I'll probably read one of th..."

I have Onion John on my TBR list (I never got that far in my gophering). I read Five Little Peppers and How they Grew a few years ago. I have seen The Watermelon King before but never added it to my TBR.


message 22: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Cherie wrote: "Ah, the Pigs in Heaven ate my The Bean Trees book.

Janice - will you take olives for a vegetable? If yes, I might finally get around to reading [book:Olive Kitteridge|1..."


I googled the definition and it says it's a fruit. Nary a word about vegetable. Bummer. I was thinking of olives myself. I'm sure I have a cover with a martini on it with the olive. But that kills that idea.

I wasn't very smart - create a challenge I don't have a book for.


message 23: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisathebooklover) | 9244 comments I clearly don't like veggies enough. I don't have a single book on my TBR that fits this challenge, lol.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Me neither Lisa! I have just gone through all my books and nothing, nada! I even checked to see if olives were considered vegetables and unfortunately, they are not.

Luckily, I am going to the library today and they have a copy of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society- which I have not read.


message 25: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments I suddenly thought of another book I own, The Chocolate Cat Caper which is the first of a series. I realized I had no idea what capers are considered to be, but some research showed it's not a vegetable unfortunately, but a spice. Definitely an educating challenge Janice, I never knew olives are fruit!


message 26: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments Janice, I noticed Lanelle has Watermelon Kings on her list. I thought it was a fruit, but when I looked it up it is listed as a fruit and vegetable in the same family as cucumbers, pumpkin, and squash. Are you accepting watermelon as a vegetable?


message 27: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanlema) | 9571 comments Wow. I am learning a lot here. I love my veggies, but never gave too much thought to all this classification.


message 28: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3723 comments For help with finding names of vegetables, try this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...


message 29: by Lanelle (new)

Lanelle | 3205 comments Kristie wrote: "Janice, I noticed Lanelle has Watermelon Kings on her list. I thought it was a fruit, but when I looked it up it is listed as a fruit and vegetable in the same family as cucumbers, pumpkin, and squ..."

I wasn't sure if watermelon was a fruit or a vegetable and I looked it up. Even the experts can't decide. We'll go with whatever you say, Janice.


message 30: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3723 comments I found a book I'd like to read. The Ginger Tree.
Is it okay?


message 31: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments I never considered a water melon to be anything other than a fruit. Interesting that there's actually discussion on what it is. Oh, apparently it's a fruit botanically, but because it grows from seeds it should be a vegetable. I always thought only tomatoes were debatable on this point.

@Roz: Isn't ginger also a spice, and not a vegetable?


message 32: by Roz (new)

Roz | 3723 comments I googled the difference between a vegetable and a fruit and it said that a fruit has seeds in it, like a watermelon (although there are seedless ones now), tomatoes, cucumbers, etc. while vegetables don't. It seems that it's the placement of the seeds that count. Vegetables can be the leaves or roots of the plant. In the Wiki site, it lists various vegetables, but also includes a list of fruits, that probably wouldn't count for this challenge. Ginger can be dried and used as a spice but it can also used fresh or pickled.

There are so many grey areas on the vegetable vs fruit issue it gets confusing. Janice??


message 33: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Kristie wrote: "Janice, I noticed Lanelle has Watermelon Kings on her list. I thought it was a fruit, but when I looked it up it is listed as a fruit and vegetable in the same family as cucumbers, pumpkin, and squ..."

I googled "watermelon definition". The one that shows on the result page didn't state it was a vegetable. Mirriam-Webster Dictionary doesn't state it's a vegetable. So I googled "Is watermelon a vegetable". It grows like a cucumber and producers use vegetable production systems to harvest so some people lumped it into a vegetable category.

I'm going to say no. If I have to work this hard to find out whether or not it's a vegetable, I'm going with it not being one.

So, rule of thumb - google the definition and if vegetable isn't mentioned in the generic dictionary, or a reputed dictionary like Mirriam-Bradley, you've answered your own question. :)


message 34: by Janice, Moderator (last edited Jul 28, 2018 07:43AM) (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Roz wrote: "I found a book I'd like to read. The Ginger Tree.
Is it okay?"


Using the rule of thumb (msg 33), it is a spice. There is no mention of it being a vegetable in two dictionaries.


message 35: by Lori Z (new)

Lori Z | 1848 comments I read A Tine to Live, A Tine to Die (Local Foods Mystery, #1) by Edith Maxwell for the yearly challenge a few years ago. I gave it 3 stars if that helps anyone. I'm going try to read the next book in the series 'Til Dirt Do Us Part (Local Foods Mystery, #2) by Edith Maxwell for this challenge.


message 36: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Some fruits are vegetables, like tomatoes: From Mirriam-Bradley dictionary, "the usually large, rounded, edible, pulpy berry of an herb (genus Solanum) of the nightshade family native to South America that is typically red but may be yellow, orange, green, or purplish in color and is eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable ".


message 37: by Peggy, Moderator (new)

Peggy (pebbles84) | 15388 comments Thanks for the clarification Janice!


message 38: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Peggy wrote: "Thanks for the clarification Janice!"

Somehow I knew this would come up, but I was in a hurry to post a challenge. The clock was going "tick, tock". Hopefully, with the rule of thumb added, things will be a little clearer. People can ask for a ruling if they still aren't sure.


message 39: by Kristie, Moderator (new)

Kristie | 14192 comments Thanks, Janice. I didn’t realize how much of a grey area there was surrounding what’s a vegetable. Lol


message 40: by Margo (new)

Margo | 10033 comments Anna wrote: "Me neither Lisa! I have just gone through all my books and nothing, nada! I even checked to see if olives were considered vegetables and unfortunately, they are not.

Luckily, I am going to the lib..."


Anna, hope you love the potato peel book as much as I did!

Like Lisa, I am coming up blank so far. The closest I found in my tbr was a book with a picture of a red mushroom on the cover. Even if mushrooms were vegetable (very dodgy clasification) I wouldn't eat the red ones lol


message 41: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments I thought I had the perfect book, Night of the Radishes: A Novel. It showed that it was available at the library (1 of 1). By the time I got there, and meandered through the Bag/$2.00 sale, it was gone. And it wasn't even listed as 0 of 1 available.

Did it end up in the sale? Good luck finding it if it did. I have trouble finding books when they are alphabetical on the shelf. There's no hope in a room full of books piled on tables with little organization.

I've made a list of about 12 books. I'll put it in my Member Zone thread if anyone is interested.


message 42: by TrudyA (new)

TrudyA (trudyan) | 1665 comments Janice, will you accept American Woman by Susan Choi (as in pok choi, a Chinese vegetable?)


message 43: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 20275 comments Who knew that a vegetable book challenge would turn out to be such a challenge? :o)

I really never thought about olives being a fruit or a vegetable before. They are always served at the salad bar and on pizzas, so I assumed they were a vegetable like food. I guess food wise, they are more of a condiment. I will get to Ms Kitteridge one of these days, Janice.

On the other hand, my challenge now, is to find a book. My library has NONE of the titles that are on my TBR list, including the one that I just added. I found one tomato title to consider, but there are two holds before me for the ebook, Killer Green Tomatoes. I might have to hit the used book store.


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

Margo wrote: "Anna wrote: "Me neither Lisa! I have just gone through all my books and nothing, nada! I even checked to see if olives were considered vegetables and unfortunately, they are not.

Luckily, I am goi..."


Thanks Margo - I hope so too. I hadn't realized there was a movie so my plan is to read the book (which I picked up yesterday from the library) and then watch the movie.


message 45: by Margo (new)

Margo | 10033 comments Yes, I must watch that movie too.


message 46: by Rusalka, Moderator (last edited Jul 29, 2018 06:55AM) (new)

Rusalka (rusalkii) | 17562 comments TrudyAn wrote: "Janice, will you accept American Woman by Susan Choi (as in pok choi, a Chinese vegetable?)"

We call it bok choy here in Aus but backing you up as a very normal everyday vegetable (asian greens we call them as we have about 5 that are used everyday. I should find my seeds too for spring...).


message 47: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments TrudyAn wrote: "Janice, will you accept American Woman by Susan Choi (as in pok choi, a Chinese vegetable?)"

Yes


message 48: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 50008 comments Cherie wrote: "Who knew that a vegetable book challenge would turn out to be such a challenge? :o)."

I know, right? Sheesh.

I decided to go with Kale. It's time for something steamy. Plus it should be a quick read and it cost me $5.00.


message 49: by TrudyA (new)

TrudyA (trudyan) | 1665 comments Janice wrote: "TrudyAn wrote: "Janice, will you accept American Woman by Susan Choi (as in pok choi, a Chinese vegetable?)"

Yes"


Thanks, Janice! It is the only book on my TBR shelf that seemed to fit.


message 50: by Cherie (last edited Jul 30, 2018 04:40PM) (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 20275 comments I think I will read The Beet Queen, because I enjoyed her writing in The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse.
I requested it from my library along with The Pumpkin Rollers. I love the title!!!


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