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message 1: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Generational voices

This month we are doing something different. The goal is to explore a book by an author (or about a character) whose age is different from your own.

If you 39 or younger, you must pick a book either written by an author over 65 or about a main character who is 65 or older.

If you are 40 or older you must pick a book written by an author under the age of 30 or about characters under the age of 30.

It's up to you to pick the book. But feel free to use this thread to brainstorm good books.


message 2: by Pip (new)

Pip | 1357 comments Now this is challenging! I am wondering how I am going to find out if something was written by a young author!


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Pip wrote: "Now this is challenging! I am wondering how I am going to find out if something was written by a young author!"
Decline and Fall
Here are a few
Less Than Zero
White Teeth
Bonjour tristesse
Sense and Sensibility
Everything Is Illuminated


message 4: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments I am brand new to the group, and this challenge seems like one I can easily jump in and participate in. So, to clarify - I pick a book (I'm planning on Less Than Zero ), and read it in August. Then at some point in the near future you will open a discussion thread with questions - is that correct? Are we to review the book read as well?


message 5: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 435 comments I object to being considered old at 40, but at least it is easier to find books written by/about <30 year olds than by/about >65 year olds. ;)

But now I feel the urge to find statistics. At what age does an author generally reach their prime? What is the age spread on the 1001-list. I mean some authors are represented on the list with pretty much everything they've ever written, but others have only one or two books on the list out of a much larger output.

I think in addition, if I am to explore a generational difference, I need to stay away from books written by/about people growing up in the 80s and 90s. Otherwise I'd just be exploring my own generational past.


message 6: by Pip (last edited Jul 25, 2018 06:06AM) (new)

Pip | 1357 comments I haven't read Less Than Zero, thanks for the suggestion, but I might just read The Pickwick Papers.


message 7: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Leni wrote: "I object to being considered old at 40, but at least it is easier to find books written by/about 65 year olds. ;)

But now I feel the urge to find statistics. At what age does an author generally r..."


Ha, 40 isn’t old. I just split it down the middle. I think the youngest author (at time of writing) on the list is Francoise Sagan but don’t know the oldest.


message 8: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Valerie wrote: "I am brand new to the group, and this challenge seems like one I can easily jump in and participate in. So, to clarify - I pick a book (I'm planning on Less Than Zero ), and read it in ..."

Yes, that is right. And yes to reviewing it too!

Welcome to the group and I’m happy to see you jump right in!


message 9: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1268 comments I was hoping that Love & Shadows, whose 2 main characters are in their twenties, was written when Allende was young as it was one of her earlier books. Well, it was written when she was young but she was still 45 when it was first published so I will look for something else. Hmmmm


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

This really is an interesting challenge & I have to say I'm struggling to find an author over 65. Have I got it right that it needs to be their age at the time of writing? I've found a few that are over 65 now but not at the time their list book was published.


message 11: by Tracy (last edited Jul 25, 2018 12:54PM) (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 557 comments The author or character should be a different age, right?

For youngsters, I’d recommend Memento Mori by Muriel Spark. The characters are elderly, and it was a good read. The Twilight Years was also a well written book about aging.

For us oldsters, I really liked Bonjour tristesse. And Murakami’s main characters are young, as was he when he wrote his first books.

Ooohhh! Split the difference with The Elegance of the Hedgehog!

I might tryA Kestrel for a Knave, and/or Glamorama. Hmm..


message 12: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Catriona wrote: "This really is an interesting challenge & I have to say I'm struggling to find an author over 65. Have I got it right that it needs to be their age at the time of writing? I've found a few that are..."

yes, their age at the time of writing. I haven't looked yet but I think Philip Roth wrote several after 65 (Nemesis was published in 2010), Toni Morrison may have been over 65 for a few of her list books, maybe Julian Barnes for sense of an ending?

Also, it can be a book about a main character who is older than 65 too so it doesn't just have to be author age.


message 13: by Valerie (last edited Jul 25, 2018 01:54PM) (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments I recently read Nemesis and The Sense of an Ending. Both are excellent and worth reading, although intense (each in their own way). Both authors were 65 yo or more when published.

For a MC that fulfills the older age requirement, I really enjoyed The Sea.


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... | 894 comments OK, I requested Bonjour tristesse from the library. Hopefully it comes on time, but if not a couple other options are available on Audible.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Many thanks for all the 65+ suggestions peeps :o) I hope to give American Pastoral a go if I can get it from the library in time.

This is a great challenge as it’s making me look at the list a lot closer & research the authors’ lives.


message 16: by Sushicat (new)

Sushicat | 292 comments For 65+, No One Writes to the Colonel has a main character that fits.


message 17: by Tatjana (new)

Tatjana JP | 280 comments How about young characters? Only Oliver Twist or Alice comes to my mind...


message 18: by Sushicat (new)

Sushicat | 292 comments Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn?


message 19: by Tatjana (new)

Tatjana JP | 280 comments Thanks Sushicat, but i have read both while still young :(


message 20: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Tatjana wrote: "Thanks Sushicat, but i have read both while still young :("

Animal’s people
To Kill a Mockingbird
Curious incident of the dog...
Vernon god little
At swim two boys
The secret history book
Chicks
Oliver Twist


Just to name a few. There are tons of books on the list with MC in their 20s or younger. If none of those interest you, I can look through and find more, let me know


message 21: by Tatjana (new)

Tatjana JP | 280 comments Thanks Jen, that’s just great!!!


message 22: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1608 comments Mod
Tatjana wrote: "Thanks Jen, that’s just great!!!"

And autocorrect changed some things.

Should be Chocky NOt chicks :)


message 24: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 3958 comments Mod
The Summer Book is great for a book with a young person and a grandmother. A quick read too.


message 25: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 435 comments Kristel wrote: "The Summer Book is great for a book with a young person and a grandmother. A quick read too."

I've been wanting to read that. I think I'll have to just bite the bullet and get an English translation, because I can't find an affordable Scandinavian edition anywhere. What baffles me is that I found an ebook version and it's "not available". It's not like an ebook can sell out, is it?


message 26: by Liz M (new)

Liz M | 194 comments The Old Devils should also work for +65 characters.


message 27: by Liz M (new)

Liz M | 194 comments Please double check before using, but these books probably were published when the author was less than 30 years old:

Anton Reiser
Wuthering Heights
King Solomon’s Mines
Hunchback of Notre Dame, the
Sister Carrie
Room With a View , A
The Green Hat
The Great Gatsby
Look Homeward, Angel
Cause for Alarm
The Living and the Dead
The Outsider
Dangling Man
Go Tell It on the Mountain
Sound of Waves, the
The Manila Rope
Sometimes a Great Notion
Things: A Story of the Sixties
The Crying of Lot 49
A Kestrel for a Knave
Anagrams
Nervous Conditions
The Secret History
Hideous Kinky
Half of a Yellow Sun
Tenant of Wildfell Hall, the
Fruits of the Earth
The Jungle
Sons and Lovers
The Enormous Room
Call it Sleep
At Swim-Two-Birds
If This Is a Man
The Deadbeats
Things Fall Apart
Rabbit, Run
The Country Girls
A Pale View of Hills
Looking for the Possible Dance
Nose, the
Thérèse Raquin
Call of the Wild, the
Crome Yellow
The Sun Also Rises
Froth on the Daydream
Wise Blood
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
River Between, the
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, the
American Psycho
Memories of Rain
Love in Excess
The Man of Feeling
Evelina
Vathek
The Lion of Flanders
Eline Vere
Oliver Twist
Hero of Our Time, A
Buddenbrooks
Young Törless
The Return of the Soldier
Retreat Without Song
This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen
The Floating Opera
Time of the Hero, the
V.
Gimmick!
The Female Quixote
The Sorrows of Young Werther
The Quest
Camera Obscura
Decline and Fall
Dark Child, the
The Lost Language of Cranes
White Teeth
Everything is Illuminated
Storm of Steel, the
Living
Andrea (Nada)
The Path to the Nest of Spiders
The Graduate
Almost Transparent Blue
On Love
Phineas Finn
Rashomon
On the Heights of Despair
Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids
Kitchen
The Time of Indifference
The Monk
Frankenstein
Blindness
The Devil in the Flesh
Bonjour Tristesse
Hyperion


message 28: by Liz M (last edited Jul 26, 2018 08:17AM) (new)

Liz M | 194 comments These books were published more than 65 years after the author's birth. Some of my data may be wrong and some of these are posthumous, so please check before using.

The Glass Bead Game
Felicia’s Journey
Doctor Zhivago
The Drowned and the Saved
The History of the Siege of Lisbon
Human Stain, the
Islands
Successor, the
The Way of All Flesh
Joseph and His Brothers
Manon des Sources
Land
Eva Trout
The Honorary Consul
Against the Day
Confessions
Reveries of a Solitary Walker
Razor’s Edge, the
Ada
A Dance to the Music of Time
The Lover
Deep River
The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll
The Book about Blanche and Marie
Plot Against America, the
Falling Man
Doctor Faustus
Last Temptation of Christ, the
The First Garden
Belle du Seigneur
Delta of Venus
Magus, the
Effi Briest
Wide Sargasso Sea
Forever a Stranger
The Heretic


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Sushicat wrote: "For 65+, No One Writes to the Colonel has a main character that fits."

I thought about that one but I've already read it. Perhaps I'm due a re-read since it's been a few years :o)


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Wow, Liz M! Brilliant lists, thanks.


message 31: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1268 comments Thank you Liz!!! Incredibly helpful.


message 32: by Sushicat (new)

Sushicat | 292 comments Leni wrote: "It's not like an ebook can sell out, is it?"

It may be that the publishing rights have expired.


message 33: by Melissa (new)

Melissa I’m trying to work my way through the Jane Austen books I haven’t read yet, so I think I’m going to go with Northanger Abbey, it was her first written, even if it wasn’t published until later. So it would have been written when she was less that 30, if I’m doing my math right.


message 34: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Actually the main character would be under 30 too, so I guess it’d work that way too.


message 35: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 435 comments Sushicat wrote: "Leni wrote: "It's not like an ebook can sell out, is it?"

It may be that the publishing rights have expired."


Oh. I didn't think of that.


message 36: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 435 comments I think I might go for Half of a Yellow Sun
I've been meaning to read that for so long. The author was 29 when it was published and, as far as I can tell, one of the main characters is 13.


message 37: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments I've finished my book, which was Less Than Zero; and posted my review in the book's folder. Am I supposed to post it here too?


message 38: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 3958 comments Mod
Valerie wrote: "I've finished my book, which was Less Than Zero; and posted my review in the book's folder. Am I supposed to post it here too?"
Did you read this as part of July perspective or August? It was last months book but maybe you chose to use it for August perspective?


message 39: by Valerie (last edited Aug 08, 2018 12:16PM) (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments Kristel wrote: "Valerie wrote: "I've finished my book, which was Less Than Zero; and posted my review in the book's folder. Am I supposed to post it here too?"
Did you read this as part of July perspec..."


I didn't realize it was July's book; as I don't see it listed anywhere. I thought July was Arab voices. Anyhow, I read it this month specifically for this challenge.


message 40: by Kristel (last edited Aug 08, 2018 02:15PM) (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 3958 comments Mod
Valerie, I think I was wrong, confused. Last month was Woman at Point Zero not Less than Zero. For now, just make comments on how this book was influenced by either the youth or maturity of the author or anything that would be related to the monthly perspective.


message 41: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments Kristel wrote: "Valerie, I think I was wrong, confused. Last month was Woman at Point Zero not Less than Zero. For now, just make comments on how this book was influenced by either the youth or maturity of the aut..."

Ok, thanks Kristel! Will do.


message 42: by Gail (new)

Gail (gailifer) | 1268 comments I read Chocky by John Wyndham.
It was a very entertaining read and was a unique science-fiction tale as it played with the concept of having an open mind about aspects of the world that you simply can not verify.
I am over 40 so this was supposed to be my reading about a young character but really it was about a family in which the young character was visited or rather inhabited by either a separate entity or the boy's own active imagination. What made the book such a delight was the 11 year old boy was such a normal boy and the parents acted in a very constrained and rather normal way to extreme circumstances. It has a decidedly old fashioned patriarchal family structure which was mostly something I would groan and ignore. The author was old when he wrote the book and it was his last book to be published before he passed away. I think Wyndham did an excellent job of capturing some memory or hidden cache of youthful open mindedness in both the 11 year old and the father in the book. It is really a wonder that this youth is what Wyndham needed to bring to life before he died.

I am going to try and read another book by a youthful author. Perhaps White Teeth if I have the time.


message 43: by Valerie (last edited Aug 09, 2018 09:35AM) (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments I read Less Than Zero - and hit all the buttons: Ellis was 21 when it was published and it is about teenagers.

If you are interested, my review is here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

I am 3 years older than Ellis, and so am very familiar with all the 80s references and can recall the teenage ennui. However, my experience is VERY different from those of the novels characters. As I mentioned in my review, I wouldn't have enjoyed this novel when it was published (1985), and would have loathed all of the characters. Now, almost 40 years later I am slightly more empathetic to Clay (the main character) and feel sad that no adult cared enough along the way to set limits for him (as a child) or model appropriate behavior.

I feel very old fashioned saying this, but I just can't see how it is appropriate for young teenagers (Clay's sisters) to be drinking champagne (yes, with the parents!). Or be handed large amounts of money to do whatever they wanted with, which in these instances since the teens have no moral compass, means buying all sorts of drugs and engaging in extremely dubious behavior (to understate it). This book is apparently roman a clef (Ellis grew up in LA) and it certainly seems that it is written by someone who has intimate knowledge of the lifestyle. It is interesting that he wrote it so young because it shows that he was very self aware and interestingly, quite cynical.

Still, it was an interesting read, and a quick one. As I mention in my review there are some VERY disturbing scenes which means this book is not for everyone.


message 44: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 3958 comments Mod
Valerie wrote: "I read Less Than Zero - and hit all the buttons: Ellis was 21 when it was published and it is about teenagers.

If you are interested, my review is here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic..."
NIce review


message 45: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments Kristel wrote: "Valerie wrote: "I read Less Than Zero - and hit all the buttons: Ellis was 21 when it was published and it is about teenagers.

If you are interested, my review is here: https://www.goo..."


Thanks!


message 46: by Tracy (new)

Tracy (tstan) | 557 comments A Kestrel for a Knave was my choice this month.
I can’t believe I waited so long for this one.
The story of a boy who loves nature, but is misunderstood and ostracized by teachers, and other adults. Billy captures and trains a kestrel, and she becomes the highlight of his life. The story is bleak, but in the end hopeful. This is a book for teens, but written in adult language, which I appreciated.


message 47: by Kristel (new)

Kristel (kristelh) | 3958 comments Mod
I read The Enormous Room by e.e. cummings for the traveling book swap and it also fit for this diversity read. Cummings wrote this memoir when he was 18 and it is about his experience in France in 1917 as an ambulance attendant who was arrested, detained by the French Government for suspicious letters written by his friend B. (William Slater Brown). I am now studying it a bit deeper before i send it on to the next person. P.S. I listened to the audio which I appreciated, now going through the I book pdf file so I can find things easier and studying the annotations which were not included in the annotated edition (?I think some one misrepresented the sale and was just selling a photo copy) I found the annotations on line so am going through those. I am sure that is going to be insightful.


message 48: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Brown | 561 comments Kristel wrote: "I read The Enormous Room by e.e. cummings for the traveling book swap and it also fit for this diversity read. Cummings wrote this memoir when he was 18 and it is about his experience..."

I have this on my TBR list. I didn't know there was an audio version, I may have to look for that.


message 49: by Tatjana (new)

Tatjana JP | 280 comments I read If this is a man by Primo Levi for Diversity Challenge. I didn't have time before, so this was a good opportunity to catch up with some of the books I missed.
The story was told by a boy of 25 who was taken by Nazis to Auschwitz. It is incredible story, hard and emotional. It is describing terrible destiny of people send to concentration camp and in particular of how one has to fight to survive in the worst possible situation. I guess that the fact of being young made him willing to find a way to survive, which was very rare for many others, faced with death.
My rating for this book would be 4 stars. I still remember that Fateless - the book of Imre Kertes with similar theme - also made such a strong impression on me.


message 50: by Dree (new)

Dree | 243 comments I read Bonjour tristesse by Françoise Sagan. The main character in the book is 17, and the author was 18 when it was published.

At first I thought Cecile, the main character was just a silly girl chasing boys and sneaking drinks. Only she doesn't have to sneak the drinks. I don't want to spoil this, but she struck me as very narcissistic rather than just young and naive. Like a Mean Girl on steroids. My edition had an interview with the author done when she was 19 or so. She seems very selfish and not unlike Cecile.

A super fast read, but the whole thing was just strange to me on so many levels.


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