Ancient & Medieval Historical Fiction discussion

Ross Poldark (Poldark #1)
This topic is about Ross Poldark
70 views
Monthly Group Reads > AUGUST 2018: ROSS POLDARK by Winston Graham

Comments Showing 1-50 of 70 (70 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Group Read thread for Ross Poldark by Winston Graham. All welcome to join in discussion, even if you have already read it... even if you haven't read it but have watched the tv series.


message 2: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments Glad this is the book that got chosen. I've never read these stories. I've participated in a few of these group reads, and I enjoy getting into discussions with other members as I read the book, not just after I've finished. I often find that other members can shed light on the historical context of the story in interesting ways.

ARK


Jodi (molomonkey) | 34 comments I’ve been wanting to read this. Going to check it out of the library when I go there tomorrow.


message 4: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments My library has book 1. Now to try and get to the library! Hopefully by end of month. They have five copies and 3 available so I don't even think I have to reserve it until closer to when i can get there. Which is good.

A. Roy,
Glad you enjoy the group reads. Makes it worth doing the polls when members get enjoyment out of the resultant group reads. :)


Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments Looking forward to this. Just got the book from my library. And just got last month's book too!


C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 564 comments Oh, this would be fun. I read the whole lot years ago, after the first tv series came out. Haven't thought about them in years. Will see if I can find a copy and join in.


message 7: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (last edited Jul 24, 2018 04:34PM) (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Had a look to see how many there actually were. 12 books.

For anybody unfamiliar (not C.P ;)..) here is the series page on Goodreads showing all the books.

https://www.goodreads.com/series/4151...

Book 12, Bella Poldark is the conclusion to the series.

I knew very little about the series until doing the book in the Poll. Mostly just thought it was a tv seriers with tv tie-in books. Now I discover the books came first.


C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 564 comments I remember reading seven, so either I didn't get the whole lot or there have been more since. ;-)

Anyhow, good to have the full list. And yes, book 1 appeared in 1945, so definitely pre-TV!

Thanks, Terri. And downloaded for Kindle, so will join in.


Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments Wow, the first book published in 1945 and the last one in 2002! Very much a saga.


Marilyn (mbk1857) | 379 comments I’d heard of Poldark before. Then when the recent TV series finished its first season, I went to Goodreads and bought the whole series. I enjoyed all the books very much. Graham was an excellent writer.


message 11: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Even though you have read them, you are more than welcome to join in any discussions, Marilyn. Jump in whenever you want. :)


Patricia | 103 comments It seems book 4 was published in 1953 & book 5 in 1973. I wonder if he had not originally planned on such a long series? Twenty years is quite a gap.


message 13: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments It sure is. Maybe he lost his 'mojo'. :) Got a case of the good old fashioned writer's block.


Marilyn (mbk1857) | 379 comments Actually, he wrote many other books in between though I’ve never read them. Check him out on Amazon books.


message 15: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments August already!? July went quick.
Has anybody started yet?


message 16: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments I'm almost ready to start Poldark -- have to finish another book first! Looking forward to it, though.

Roy K.


message 17: by C.P. (new) - rated it 3 stars

C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 564 comments Ack, no! I wish. Other intrusions made it impossible for me to finish my July commitments yet.

Still hoping for mid-August, though.


message 18: by Nicky (new) - added it

Nicky Moxey | 4 comments I've finished! And much to my surprise, I enjoyed it. For some reason, I expected this to be one of those rare occasions when the TV series would be better than the book; maybe the scything scene, or emerging from the sea, had something to do with that expectation... but I found the book held my interest well. I'll leave it at that until other people have read it, no spoilers :)


message 19: by Jodi (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jodi (molomonkey) | 34 comments I’m about halfway through and find myself enjoying it. I like the tv series as well. The only thing that drives me nuts is reading the different accents. I find it distracting. Otherwise, I’m liking the book so far. It’s making me want to rewatch the series.


message 20: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Emerging from the sea? Does Poldark have his own Heathcliff moment in the tv series?


message 21: by Harold (new)

Harold Titus (haroldtitus) | 29 comments Jodi wrote: "I’m about halfway through and find myself enjoying it. I like the tv series as well. The only thing that drives me nuts is reading the different accents. I find it distracting. Otherwise, I’m likin..."

In order to make realistic the way the common class and the gentry talked at that time, I made a glossary of words and phrases Winston Graham and Patrick OBrian used as a source for writing a period piece of my own. I am especially impressed with how Graham portrays his characters.


message 22: by Margaret, Sherlockian Sheila (new)

Margaret (margyw) | 3299 comments Terri wrote: "Emerging from the sea? Does Poldark have his own Heathcliff moment in the tv series?"

Yes. It sent Twitter into meltdown when it screened.


Rissi (iriss924) | 3 comments I finished Poldark in 2 days. Graham has a poetic way with language, which I really enjoyed because his descriptions pulled me, very strongly, into his story. He does deep character development, too.


message 24: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments I just started reading this last night. I'm always interested in a story's relationship to place. "Poldark" takes place in Cornwall, correct? Has anyone here lived in Cornwall or spent time there?

Roy K.


message 25: by Tina (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tina (javabird) | 58 comments Patricia wrote: "It seems book 4 was published in 1953 & book 5 in 1973. I wonder if he had not originally planned on such a long series? Twenty years is quite a gap."

BBC did a series in the 70s which was very popular and revived a lot of interest in the books.


message 26: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments I'm getting more and more intrigued by the book. Still haven't had a chance to get to the library though. It's an hour away so the trip takes planning. Lol.


Linda (ladylawyer8650) | 1691 comments I have not communicated with my friends from A&M for too long. I could have been reading Ross Poldark and did
not know it. My younger son's girlfriend was showing me how to use my new Apple pad and that is how I learned about BBC and PBS and Downton Abbey, Poldark, etc., accessed through YouTube I always skipped the group media discussions because I am not technically gifted. Let me ramble a little more. Lol. The British put out some great entertainment! My son needs to marry that girl!


message 28: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Well the read of Poldark has only just started. You can always jump in. :-)

If I can't get to library in time to read Poldark this month, I may have to watch the tv series and quizz people who have seen/read both on how different they are!

Is book #1 the whole first season of Poldark?
Or is book #1 only a portion of season 1 of the tv series?


message 29: by Jerry (new)

Jerry Bennett | 146 comments A. Roy wrote: "I just started reading this last night. I'm always interested in a story's relationship to place. "Poldark" takes place in Cornwall, correct? Has anyone here lived in Cornwall or spent time there?
..."

I knew Cornwall well, but some years ago now. The coastline is really spectacular, but Bodmin Moor can be a bit bleak. Poldark is set at a time when it was one of the foremost mining areas in England, mainly copper, lead and tin. The first steam pumping engines were invented by Cornish mining engineers, and one of them, Richard Trevithick, went on to invent a steam-powered stage coach and the first steam railway engine. The railway engine was quite successful, but the stage coach was banned from London for being too noisy and frightening horses.

At one time it was an independent kingdom, and has always been seen as being somehow different from the rest of England. The Duchy of Cornwall is in the gift of the royal family and has been since the early Middle Ages. The present Duke is Prince Charles. It is arguably the foremost area in England for tourism, mainly due to its mild climate and excellent beaches. It is a great place for surfing and sailing.


Patricia | 103 comments I read Ross Poldark several months ago & am in the middle of reading Demelza, book 2 in the series. For any ebook readers in the U.S.--the first three in the series are on sale for 2.99 each. (Kindle & Nook, haven't checked any others). Not sure about other countries, but maybe someone else can check?


message 31: by May (new) - rated it 3 stars

May (mayzie) | 838 comments Finally made it to the Library. I can start ROSS POLDARK tonight!!


message 32: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments Jerry wrote: "At one time it was an independent kingdom, and has always been seen as being somehow different from the rest of England. ."

Jerry - Thanks so much for responding to that question -- just the kinds of comments that can add dimension to this reading -- and that's funny about the steam-powered stage coach!

Yes, I had wondered whether Cornwall might be seen as different from the rest of England -- in part, I guess, because of its remoteness. I wonder, too, whether its geography and history might make it a little akin to Wales. Checking on its history, I see it was inhabited by Britons in ancient times.

Roy K.


message 33: by Margaret, Sherlockian Sheila (new)

Margaret (margyw) | 3299 comments Cornish is a separate Celtic language, like Scots Gaelic, Erse, Welsh and Manx. I'm not sure if there are any speakers of it left.

I have visited Cornwall once. It is an odd place. It feels different to the rest of Britain.


message 34: by Sherry (new)

Sherry | 144 comments FYI, after puzzling about the relative location of various places in Ross Poldark, I found a map online that Winston Graham drew himself. Unfortunately I can't find a link to it, but if you google "Poldark's Cornwall map" you'll turn it up. Very helpful.


message 35: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments Sherry wrote: " I found a map online that Winston Graham drew himself. Unfortunately I can't find a link to it, bu..."

I searched around, but couldn't find a map directly attributed to Graham. However, here's a link to a pretty detailed map from someone's blog:

https://ellenandjim.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/poldarkcountry.jpg

Roy K.


message 36: by Terri, Wyrd bið ful aræd (new) - added it

Terri | 19506 comments Terrific. Thanks for finding that and sharing it, Roy.


message 37: by Jerry (new)

Jerry Bennett | 146 comments Margaret wrote: "Cornish is a separate Celtic language, like Scots Gaelic, Erse, Welsh and Manx. I'm not sure if there are any speakers of it left.

I have visited Cornwall once. It is an odd place. It feels differ..."


There are still a few Cornish speakers, and they are trying to revive the language. There is even a small Cornish independence movement. I agree with you Margaret, it is different to the rest of England, but it is a very attractive difference. I assume the author felt the same, as did Daphne du Maurier who set some of her books in Cornwall.


message 38: by C.P. (new) - rated it 3 stars

C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 564 comments Margaret wrote: "Terri wrote: "Emerging from the sea? Does Poldark have his own Heathcliff moment in the tv series?"

Yes. It sent Twitter into meltdown when it screened."


It's in the book too: chapter 6, I think. Probably less impressive than the TV version. ;-)


message 39: by May (new) - rated it 3 stars

May (mayzie) | 838 comments This is my first contact t with Ross POLDARK. I had not read any of these novels nor watched the PBS series. I enjoyed this Book 1. Certainly the time and place are well established and influence the plot. Other than Ross & Demelza, and maybe Aunt Agatha, I am not fond of any of the characters.
However, since I have Friends very engaged in the series, I expect I will read Book 2.


Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments I just started this (I'm through chapter 4) and I'm loving it. Ross is a great character. I'm wondering where this is going with him being jilted right up front... XD


Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments Just finished. I quite enjoyed it! At first I was a bit bored and wondered what all the fuss was about but then I realized that this was a true SAGA and we were learning about the whole place, not just the main characters. I loved that.

It really made me want to go stand on a cliff on the coast of Cornwall! Definitely going to continue the series.


message 42: by Harold (new)

Harold Titus (haroldtitus) | 29 comments Laura wrote: "Just finished. I quite enjoyed it! At first I was a bit bored and wondered what all the fuss was about but then I realized that this was a true SAGA and we were learning about the whole place, not ..."

The reading gets even better as you proceed.


message 43: by Jerry (new)

Jerry Bennett | 146 comments There is an interesting news item in today’s UK press about the boss of “Visit Cornwall” discouraging people from visiting certain sites because they are now too crowded. One of the reasons for this is the popularity of the curren TV series of Poldark.


Linda (ladylawyer8650) | 1691 comments Iam watching POLDARD as we speak.


Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments I want to watch it too but am worried about spoilers. Anybody know how many of the books should be read before watching it?


message 46: by C.P. (new) - rated it 3 stars

C.P. Lesley (cplesley) | 564 comments Laura wrote: "I want to watch it too but am worried about spoilers. Anybody know how many of the books should be read before watching it?"

I wouldn't worry about that. I watched the whole 1970s series before reading the books, and in fact the episodes enhanced the reading. Tackling book 1 again after 40+ years, I am distinctly under-impressed, which is why I'm falling behind after a good start.

My two cents, of course. Your mileage may vary. ;-)


message 47: by Laura Tenfingers (last edited Aug 13, 2018 10:43PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Laura Tenfingers | 174 comments Thanks C.P.!


message 48: by A. Roy (new)

A. Roy King (aroyking) | 54 comments One small thing that stands out to me in "Ross Poldark" is Ross's status as a soldier returning from the American revolutionary war. Ross's time spent in the war (two years, is it?) has shaped his character and matured him.

As a yank, I'm used to history, books, TV, movies, etc. that treat the war from the American side, so reading (and watching the TV series) about a protagonist from the British side sparks my interest.

One of the main things that struck me about this is the way others talk to Ross about the war when he returns home at the beginning of the book. After hearing a couple of derogatory comments about the failed war effort, he finally responds:

>>"“Do tell uth,” lisped Polly Choake, “thome of youw exthpewiences, Captain Poldark: how we lotht the wa’, what theethe Amewicanth awe like, and—”

“Very like us, ma’am. That’s why we lost it.”<<

From what other readers know, is Graham's portrayal typical of the attitude of British people in general after the war?

In some ways it makes me think of the experience of American service members returning home after the failed war in Vietnam. Few parades or celebrations; little acknowledgment of all they had been through.

Roy K.


Linda (ladylawyer8650) | 1691 comments How many books are there in the Poldark series? Will the PBS cover all of the books if there are more than one book?


message 50: by Margaret, Sherlockian Sheila (new)

Margaret (margyw) | 3299 comments Thought this might be of interest.

https://www.historyextra.com/period/m...


« previous 1
back to top