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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 16071 comments Ok, so after Apple was fined by EU a couple of years ago (don't know whether it's still challenged in courts), now comes Google's turn: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...
Only a modest 5 billion USD.
Does it mean the authorities took the gloves off with regard to global corporations? Only EU? Only EU vs US companies? What do you think?


message 2: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Taxes by another name.


message 3: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 3079 comments Well given Google Microsoft and Apple pay so little maybe this is an alternate taxation proposal. This is the second big fine from EU to Google - Advertising was the last one - still being appealed. The Apple case is slightly different as it was EU instructing Ireland to collect due taxes rather than give Apple unfair advantage.

Previous examples were Microsoft over the whole Internet Explorer Netscape and on the news item. Truck manufacturers have had the biggest anti-competiton for fixing prices and car glass manufacturers for the same thing

Google has already said it will appeal but if they don't pay up in 90 days the fine goes to daily increases.

Just waiting for the first GDPR fine of 4% of global revenue. I wonder if it will be Facebook, Google or some other data munching company. I'd focus on Experian and Equifax as the world's biggest credit reference agencies. They make all their real money selling data on.


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11786 comments Probably a bit clumsy, but I think it is about time govrnments made the multis pay proper taxes in the countries of operation. After all, the companies that liver there have to, and I see no reason to give big foreign corporations an unfair advantage.


message 5: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 3079 comments Ian wrote: "Probably a bit clumsy, but I think it is about time govrnments made the multis pay proper taxes in the countries of operation. After all, the companies that liver there have to, and I see no reason..."

Jobs, brown envelopes or Swiss accounts or nice holidays with social contacts. All supported by city investors who look at global numbers and ignore how little tax is paid then complain when governments have no money to fix anything. In UK at the moment the same city accountants and brokers who encourage tax avoidance (if not outright evasion) then complain about trains not running on time and the government "must do something."


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 11786 comments Philip, the world is not short of hypocrisy either


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