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SF/F Book Recommendations > Civilization Building Similars

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message 1: by Lauro (new)

Lauro Soto | 4 comments Hello all i was curious hopefully this is the right place to ask this if not im sorry.

I was wondering like the title says any other books similar to this
Cast Under an Alien Sun (Destiny's Crucible #1) by Olan Thorensen Cast Under an Alien Sun

I really like the whole idea to transported to another world w/o being a LITRPG , kinda remind me of David Weber Safehold but anyway could anyone pitch in some good books on this ? type civilization building?


message 2: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2279 comments This is the basis for a lot of books & stories. Here are some oldies, but goodies. Some are parts of series, but stand alone well.
The Maker of Universes
Pebble in the Sky
Farnham's Freehold
Immortality, Inc.

A newer one is The Lighthouse Land. McKinty is typically a gritty adult suspense author, so I found a YA novel from him interesting. It was pretty good.


message 3: by Lauro (last edited Jul 18, 2018 12:19PM) (new)

Lauro Soto | 4 comments Thanks i already read some of the Oldies hehe but do you know of some newer ones ? 2000+ ?
Still Thanks


message 4: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 05, 2018 08:33AM) (new)

I've always liked Dave Duncan's The Reluctant Swordsman trilogy, in which a modern (1988) man gets dumped in an alternate pre-literate sword & sorcery world.

Dickson's The Dragon and the George not only dumps a modern man in a sword & sorcery world, it puts him into the body of a dragon. This is mostly played for humor.

Foster's Spellsinger has a wizard summon a man from our world to his sword & sorcery land.

In a more recent SF bent, in Carolyn Ives Gilman's Dark Orbit, has interstellar travel. The heroine thinks she's the first human to reach a new world, but unexpectedly finds herself amid a very strange offshoot of humanity; I found their culture fascinating.

Gaiman's Neverwhere drags a man into an alternate parallel "under city" of London, and his Coraline drags a girl into button-eye world.

A YA Japanese series of 4 books, The Twelve Kingdoms, has been translated to English. It transports a Japanese high schooler into a weird fantasy world, an interesting example of Isekai.

And of course more classics such as Wonderland, Oz, Narnia, Gulliver and Barsoom.


message 5: by Chris (last edited Jul 19, 2018 01:50AM) (new)

Chris Naylor The Reluctant Sorcerer is a fun read. And it's been a long time since I read it, but I remember enjoying The Warlock in Spite of Himself.

If you're willing to accept time travel as the means by which the modern-day protagonist is dumped in a pre-industrial world (in this case Elizabethan England), then I can recommend King of Shadows, which I'm reading at the moment.


message 6: by R.S. (new)

R.S. Leergaard (rsleergaard1) | 5 comments Just for something a little different, I'd suggest the Otherland tetralogy City of Golden Shadow by Tad Williams. Even though he does his world building in future virtual reality, it's still a pretty intricate and compelling world he builds there. (My opinion only).


message 7: by Ken (new)

Ken RS Leergaard wrote: "Just for something a little different, I'd suggest the Otherland tetralogy City of Golden Shadow by Tad Williams. Even though he does his world building in future virtual reality, it's..."

I found the first book was very difficult to get through. If I hadn't been a fan of his other books, I might have given up. However, that was the tediousness of setting the world. I'm so thankful I continued because I LOVED this series!


message 8: by R.S. (new)

R.S. Leergaard (rsleergaard1) | 5 comments Ken wrote: "I found the first book was very difficult to get through. If I hadn't been a fan of his other books, I might have given up. However, that was the tediousness of setting the world. I'm so thankful I continued because I LOVED this series! "

I agree about the slow start, and I'm not sure that the bit he called forward is actually a forward. For someone who doesn't know what they're starting, it reads like it might be a WWII historical fiction or something, and not the virtual reality world it's really about. Once it gets going, though, it's a really good series.


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