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The Monday Poem > "The Power He Had Gained" by Darrick (July 16, '18)

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message 1: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments The Power He Had Gained by: Darrick


The Power He Had Gained

It all started with a few name-calling
Then the arguments had gotten worst
When she became intimidated
The lust had now become a curse.

The more timid she became
The more power he had gained
What was once name calling, then arguments
Had now become physical over and over again.

So hard he hit her
So hard he stomped and kicked her
Even reached back and punched her too
She thinks she’d finally had escaped him
Until she now had come to.

No reason he needed now, it was all repetition
The more timid she became
The more power he had gained.
Filled with rage again, he begins his angry shouts
But indeed sees a change.

He can tell there’s no more pain she feels
Nor did she hope her reality wasn’t real.
All her tears she had kept
No more fear of him she had was left
And no more did she feared death
And he knew the power he had gained—

Had left.


message 2: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments I decided to be the second person, I think, to post their own work here. Because I believe a poem speaks to each person differently, I’ll keep my thoughts about this poem brief.

This is a poem is about being in a relationship with someone, or living with someone before really getting to know that person. The relationship becomes toxic and abusive. It’s also about, in this case, gaining the courage to fight back.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

That is a difficult topic to cover but I think you have done it with care. I like the way you speak about the importance of power in a relationship like this. I particularly like the last few lines

Thanks for posting


message 4: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 12313 comments Mod
Thank you for sharing your own poem, Darrick. Like Heather says, it is a difficult topic to talk about but I think your poem handled it so well.
I like the last stanza as it shows hope and the power to eventually fight back.


message 5: by Greg (last edited Jul 16, 2018 12:34PM) (new)

Greg | 7688 comments Mod
The subject is disturbing like Alannah & Heather say: it reminds me of my reaction to the similar subect matter in the first part of Another Country - it makes me squirm a bit, which is not a bad thing. The poem feels like it's meant to provoke & challenge. The treatment in the poem is direct and raw.


message 6: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments Heather wrote: "That is a difficult topic to cover but I think you have done it with care. I like the way you speak about the importance of power in a relationship like this. I particularly like the last few lines..."

Thanks Heather, abuse is far too common and widespread in different ways. Although in the end many ends with tragedy, in some fortunate cases, the abused is able to find enough strength to fight back, get help, and get out.


message 7: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments Alannah wrote: "Thank you for sharing your own poem, Darrick. Like Heather says, it is a difficult topic to talk about but I think your poem handled it so well.
I like the last stanza as it shows hope and the pow..."


Thanks Alannah, with so much abuse going on in relationships, and even the gravity of the abuse; it can be difficult to articulate without too much graphic details.


message 8: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments Greg wrote: "The subject is disturbing like Alannah & Heather say: it reminds me of my reaction to the similar subect matter in the first part of Another Country - it makes me squirm a bit, which i..."

Yes , I think the poem has that up close, raw and direct feel to it as you say. As for James Baldwin “Another Country” I haven’t read, but will do so now that you reference it. I have listen to many of his talks and debates, read and own “Go Tell It on the Mountain,” but I have been lacking in reading his other works. Thanks Greg for the reminder.


message 9: by Joan (new)

Joan Derrick
WOW!
I like the way you used the rhythm of the words to convey
the punching (this doesn’t feel like the right word but it’s all I have)
the violence and
the destruction of a woman’s spirit.


message 10: by Joan (new)

Joan I didn’t feel hope at the end as Alannah and Heather did - I imagined it would be a living death and finally literal death that moved her beyond his power.

As Derrick said each poem speaks differently to each reader.

http://www.thehotline.org/resources/s...


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Joan wrote: "I didn’t feel hope at the end as Alannah and Heather did - I imagined it would be a living death and finally literal death that moved her beyond his power.

As Derrick said each poem speaks differe..."


That's really interesting. The way I saw it was that she was able to leave him because she was numb from everything that happened. She escaped the abuse because she was able to flee once he had broken her spirit.


message 12: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments Joan wrote: "Derrick
WOW!
I like the way you used the rhythm of the words to convey
the punching (this doesn’t feel like the right word but it’s all I have)
the violence and
the destruction of a woman’s spirit."


Thanks Joan


message 13: by Darrick (new)

Darrick Williams | 34 comments I think the verse “And no more did she feared death” is what brings the reader to their interpretation of what happen next.

Did she become numb and without fear, and accepted her fate?
Did she continue to fight back and stay in the relationship?
She gained the strength to fight back and leave?
She gained the strength to get help?
Did she gain the strength and courage to fight back and not be abused anymore. Get help, Kill or be killed to get out of the toxic relationship.

Even in Joan’s interpretation - I imagined it would be a living death and finally literal death that moved her beyond his power.

Poetry brings conversations, and conversations brings different perspectives.


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