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Recommendations and Lost Books > Time Travel Books

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message 1: by David (new)

David Navratil | 25 comments Newbie David needing help! Need some recommendations on some modern Time Travel SF books. I have read none (except for HG Wells).
Any response is appreciated! Tks, DN


message 2: by Anthony (last edited Jul 12, 2018 10:12AM) (new)

Anthony (albinokid) | 1471 comments Doomsday Book by Connie Willis is one of my all-time favorite books. Highly highly recommended.


message 3: by Allison, Fairy Mod-mother (new)

Allison Hurd | 13034 comments Mod
Arcadia is really different. I enjoyed it quite a bit. Not a quick read, but very clever.


message 4: by Dawn F (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments Following this thread! I find time travel a really difficult subject to describe as it’s hard to make believable (at least for me). I’m definitely interested in any that deal well with the common paradoxes, etc.


message 5: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 2610 comments All Our Wrong Today’s by Elan Mastai was fun. Lighter on the Science-Fiction side but is all about time travel.


message 6: by Anthony (new)

Anthony (albinokid) | 1471 comments One of the concepts of Connie Willis’s time travel books is that in the future, historians will be able to travel to the period they’re studying, but they have to assimilate themselves in that period, so as not to create paradoxes or problems with the locals. It raises many issues that I find very compelling. Her work is so humane and powerful.


message 7: by Allison, Fairy Mod-mother (new)

Allison Hurd | 13034 comments Mod
Arcadia says "fie on your paradox!" and scoots right on past the issue haha


message 8: by Margaret (new)

Margaret | 411 comments I found The Time Traveler's Wife to be intensely interesting.


message 9: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 1323 comments Connie Willis whole time traveler series; i think Dark Matter might fit; and although not modern- The Dragonriders of pern might fit too.


message 10: by Silvana (new)

Silvana (silvaubrey) | 2526 comments Will always recommend The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers.


message 11: by Trike (new)

Trike Mammoth by John Varley.

Thrice Upon a Time by James P. Hogan. This one is not modern, as it was published in 1980, and it’s not great literature, but it is a unique twist on the genre in that it is about time *communication* rather than time travel. It takes place in the then-distant future of 2010 (ooh), and while in some respects it is comically off the mark, in others it was amazingly prescient.

The Company books by Kage Baker. They’re about time-traveling cyborgs who are “preserving history”. At least, that’s what they’re told. I accidentally started with the second one, Sky Coyote, which I quite liked, but the first book is In the Garden of Iden.

Kindred by Octavia Butler. Also not modern, but Butler, like Varley, is a master.

The Accidental Time Machine by Joe Haldeman. A bit of a darker take on time travel, more along the lines of H.G. Wells’ original story.

Then there are other books where time travel figures prominently but is not the main point of the story, such as Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonflight and R.M. Meluch’s Space Opera book The Myriad.


message 12: by CBRetriever (new)

CBRetriever | 4625 comments Kindred by Octavia Butler is good = African-American woman finds herself back in the "Old South"

The Book of Kells by R.A. MacAvoy is also good = two people end up in ancient Ireland


message 13: by David (new)

David Navratil | 25 comments Thanks very much for all suggestions! I'm surprised anyone responded. I belong to some LINUX forums at other sites and can't get responses too often to my questions!! Tks DN


message 14: by Carro (new)

Carro | 195 comments Jodi Taylor's St Mary's Series - a bouncy take on time travel - bunch of enthusiastic academics doing research on historical events. Has a limitation of an individual can't visit the same time twice. Quite an interesting range of historical events and even pre-historic. Does Ancient Greece, Babylon, King Alfred the Great, Mary Stuart, Great Fire of London and more.
Ken Grimwood - Replay. Not a time machine but being re-born and re-living your life. Groundhog Day was loosely based on it.


message 15: by Jess (last edited Jul 13, 2018 07:51AM) (new)

Jess Penhallow | 35 comments I concur with Connie Willis all her books are about time travel of a sort but they are all so different so there's something for everyone:

Drama - Doomsday Book
Comedy - To Say Nothing of the Dog
Mystery - Passage

Really great books all of them.


message 16: by Anna, Circadian heretic (new)

Anna (vegfic) | 9629 comments Mod
Should someone want to discuss time travel books from the author's POV, here is a thread for that!


message 17: by Bobby (new)

Bobby | 869 comments Timeline by Michael Crichton is the only one I can think of right now, but I really liked it.


message 18: by Dawn F (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments Bobby wrote: "Timeline by Michael Crichton is the only one I can think of right now, but I really liked it."

Ooooh. I read his Jurassic Park and Sphere when I was a teenager. I remember liking his mathematics and science focus. I had no idea he had written something with time travel, I'll definitely want to read this!


message 19: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin | 685 comments Dawn wrote: "Bobby wrote: "Timeline by Michael Crichton is the only one I can think of right now, but I really liked it."

Ooooh. I read his Jurassic Park and Sphere when I was a teena..."


Not to throw cold water on this, but 'Timeline' was not the best book by Michael Crichton, in my opinion. His explanation of the technology involved was both convoluted and illogical and, worst of all, the action plot was weak and the 'bad guy' was a near caricature, while many of the characters were quite clueless.


message 20: by Dawn F (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments Michel wrote: "Not to throw cold water on this, but 'Timeline' was not the best book by Michael Crichton, in my opinion. His explanation of the technology involved was both convoluted and illogical and, worst of all, the action plot was weak and the 'bad guy' was a near caricature, while many of the characters were quite clueless. "

Oh, okay. Thanks for the warning. To be honest I now want to read everything requested in this thread so it may take a while to get to it!


message 21: by Dawn F (last edited Jul 13, 2018 11:03AM) (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments This is very specific, but the second Star Trek: The Original Series novel, The Entropy Effect by Vonda N. McIntyre, has a really good time loop plot that's quite believable (and frustrating), and aside from being a Star Trek novel is really one of my favorite books.


message 22: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (ginny83) Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy, Kindred by Octavia Butler, The End of Eternity by Isaac Asimov, All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai, the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. My husband really liked 11/22/63 but I haven't read it yet.


message 23: by MadProfessah (new)

MadProfessah (madprofesssah) | 741 comments Second the mentions of REPLAY, 11/22/63 (Stephen King) and DOOMSDAY BOOK by Connie Willis.

I finally read the first St.Mary’s book and while I love the premise the main character and comedy-romance elements don’t work for me so I doubt I’ll read any others...

ANUBIS GATES (Tim Powers) *shudder* I cannot fathom why/how people like that book....


message 24: by Chris (new)

Chris | 1046 comments You might also look into books that feature time dilation - people at different speeds moving forward through time at different rates. Pushing Ice and The Forever War are a couple of examples.


message 25: by Trike (last edited Jul 14, 2018 08:10AM) (new)

Trike Chris wrote: "You might also look into books that feature time dilation - people at different speeds moving forward through time at different rates. Pushing Ice and The Forever War are ..."

Also Tau Zero and A World Out of Time.


message 26: by ash (new)

ash | spaceyreads (ashych) | 14 comments Allison wrote: "Arcadia is really different. I enjoyed it quite a bit. Not a quick read, but very clever."

I loved Arcadia. And on that note, I have a soft spot for books of other genres with time travel elements in them:

The Gradual
Life After Life
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August
11/22/63

That said, I loved Replay by Ken Grimwood. It's what I would call a pure time travel story that explores living in a time loop. Scary and intriguing.


message 27: by M.L. (new)

M.L. | 946 comments I don't like Anubis Gates, I love it! :)


message 28: by CBRetriever (new)

CBRetriever | 4625 comments I really didn't like the Stephen King one and pretty much stopped reading his books after that


message 29: by Dawn F (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments ashley wrote: "I loved Arcadia. And on that note, I have a soft spot for books of other genres with time travel elements in them:

The Gradual
Life After Life
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August
11/22/63

That said, I loved Replay by Ken Grimwood. It's what I would call a pure time travel story that explores living in a time loop. Scary and intriguing."


Life After Life was really interesting. Kate Atkinson has a very engaging and vivid, almost lyrical way of writing and her humor is very dry and ironic. Though it was more of a family portrait during WW2 than actual time travel, it did captivate me.

Thanks a lot for the other recs, too, duly noted!


message 30: by Ian (new)

Ian (troyka) I can recommend this book series it's not serious, there is a lot of humour, some death much confusion and a quite a few time machines with navigational abilities.

Just One Damned Thing After Another (The Chronicles of St Mary's Series Book 1) by Jodi Taylor
The Amazon blurb reads:
Time Travel meets History in this explosive bestselling adventure series.

‘So tell me, Dr Maxwell, if the whole of History lay before you … where would you go? What would you like to witness?’

When Madeleine Maxwell is recruited by the St Mary’s Institute of Historical Research, she discovers the historians there don’t just study the past – they revisit it.
But one wrong move and History will fight back – to the death. And she soon discovers it’s not just History she’s fighting…
Follow the tea-soaked disaster magnets of St Mary’s as they rattle around History. Because wherever the historians go, chaos is sure to follow.


message 31: by David (new)

David Navratil | 25 comments Thank you for the suggestion! Putting it on my list with others that have been suggested!! DN

Ian wrote: "I can recommend this book series it's not serious, there is a lot of humour, some death much confusion and a quite a few time machines with navigational abilities.

Just One Damned Thing After Ano..."



message 32: by Jerry-Book (new)

Jerry-Book | 86 comments Just read an old classic by Isaac Asimov "The End of Eternity". A 1955 time travel book. It is considered one of his best books.


message 33: by Lars (new)

Lars Dradrach (larsdradrach) | 79 comments The End of Eternity rocks and has a nice however weak link to the foundation books


message 34: by Dj (new)

Dj | 1972 comments Lightning
Lightning by Dean Koontz
It happens to be one of my favorites by Koontz.


message 35: by Bree (new)

Bree Verity (breeverity) | 28 comments Ian wrote: "I can recommend this book series it's not serious, there is a lot of humour, some death much confusion and a quite a few time machines with navigational abilities.

Just One Damned Thing After Ano..."


I thought Just One Damned Thing went on and on and on and on, like the author wrote it in serial and just kept adding crises once the main story was finished. It annoyed me. But the time travel concepts were well handled, sure.


message 36: by V.W. (new)

V.W. Singer | 371 comments The Saga of the Pliocene by Julian May, starting with:
The Many-Coloured Land
A complex and fascinating time travel series ranging from the distant past and into the far future.

The Time Wars series by Simon Hawke, starting with:
The Ivanhoe Gambit
Time travel/fantasy series involving famous fictional characters.

Novel by Harry Turtledove, modern day to American Civil War.
The Guns of the South
A time traveller brings the plans for a sub machine gun back to the Confederate South.

The Time Patrol series by Poul Anderson.
Time Patrol
History needs to be protected once time travel is invented. Enter the Time Patrol.


message 37: by Viv (new)

Viv Carvalho David wrote: "Newbie David needing help! Need some recommendations on some modern Time Travel SF books. I have read none (except for HG Wells).
Any response is appreciated! Tks, DN"


Try "All you need is kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka". There was a movie made off the book as well (Edge of tomorrow). Pretty good read it is.


message 38: by David (new)

David Navratil | 25 comments Thank you Viv, I've got a good list now and as soon as I finish my mystery book I will start on SF! I just got a kindle paper white last week and still trying to figure out how to use it!! David


message 39: by Ian (new)

Ian (troyka) Bree wrote: "Ian wrote: "I can recommend this book series it's not serious, there is a lot of humour, some death much confusion and a quite a few time machinves with navigational abilities.

Just One Damned Thi..."


I know what you mean, I started to think of the series as a bunch of short stories all in one book rather than one story.


message 40: by Robinhj (new)

Robinhj | 28 comments The Time Traveler's Wife is one of my all time favourite books. One of the only books to make this cynical old man cry like a girlie :-)


message 41: by Dani (new)

Dani | 8 comments The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle is among my favourite reads of this year so far.

Don't read many reviews or blurbs beforehand I'd say, because the less you know the better the experience. I promise you it's a great read.


message 42: by Trike (new)

Trike Dani wrote: "The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle is among my favourite reads of this year so far.

Don't read many reviews or blurbs beforehand I'd say, because the less you know the better th..."


This sounds like Happy Death Day meets Gosford Park. Color me intrigued.


message 43: by Randy (new)

Randy Money | 92 comments If you're not allergic to short stories, or don't mind plugging in a few here and there between novels, there's a chunk of an anthology edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer: The Time Traveler's Almanac.

I haven't read it cover to cover, but I've read some of the stories and it strikes me as a solid anthology.

Randy M.


message 44: by Cross777 (new)

Cross777 | 9 comments Leo Frankowski's Conrad Stargard books. (skip the last one written by someone else) more fun than historical.


message 45: by Gary (new)

Gary Gillen | 145 comments The book I think of when it comes to time travel is The Man Who Folded Himself by David Gerrold. It explores the nature of time travel paradox.


message 46: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 63 comments I highly recommend THE BEST TIME TRAVEL STORIES OF THE 20th CENTURY, edited by Harry Turtledove and Martin H. Greenberg.

Includes "Fire Watch" by Connie Willis, "The Sound of Thunder" by Ray Bradbury, "Time's Arrow" by Arthur C. Clarke, and "Sailing to Byzantium" by Robert Silverberg.

Also: (from the Amazon page:)

“Yesterday Was Monday” If all the world’s a stage, Theodore Sturgeon’s compelling tale follows the odyssey of an ordinary joe who winds up backstage.

“Rainbird” R. A. Lafferty reflects on what might have been in this brainteaser about an inventor so brilliant that he invents himself right out of existence.

“Timetipping” What if everyone time-traveled except you? Jack Dann provides some surprising answers in this literary gem.

. . . as well as twelve other stories, including

“Time Locker” by Henry Kuttner • “I’m Scared” by Jack Finney • “A Gun for Dinosaur” by L. Sprague de Camp • “The Man Who Came Early” by Poul Anderson • “Leviathan!” by Larry Niven • “Anniversary Project” by Joe Halderman • “The Pure Product” by John Kessel • “Trapalanda” by Charles Sheffield • “The Price of Oranges” by Nancy Kress • “Another Story, or A Fisherman of the Inland Sea” by Ursula K. Le Guin


message 47: by David (new)

David Navratil | 25 comments Mindy wrote: "I highly recommend THE BEST TIME TRAVEL STORIES OF THE 20th CENTURY, edited by Harry Turtledove and Martin H. Greenberg.

Includes "Fire Watch" by Connie Willis, "The Sound of Thunder" by Ray Brad..."


Thanks you for all your help! I really got alot of good recommendations!! David N.


message 48: by Histrio (new)

Histrio (histrion) | 11 comments I am a sucker for time travel - there are SO many books here I need to read!
Since more is always better, might I recommend Night Watch, Thief of Time, and Pyramids from the Discworld.
For a humorous, paradoxes-are-fun, point of view try Harry Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat.
Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next series has some really fun paradoxes too.
And finally, for a nice classic, try Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.


message 49: by Gabi (new)

Gabi | 3405 comments Oh yes, I second Pratchett's Night Watch - one utterly terrific time travel book.


message 50: by Dawn F (new)

Dawn F (psychedk) | 1219 comments Dj wrote: "Lightning
Lightning by Dean Koontz
It happens to be one of my favorites by Koontz."


I just read this one, 20 years after my mom recommended it to me, and I enjoyed it *a lot*, even if it's somewhat of an anachronism XD


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