Art Lovers discussion

28 views
Picture of the Day > July 2018

Comments Showing 1-50 of 176 (176 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4

message 1: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments I don't know if I can be as diligent, nor as creative as LG was but I don't know where she is and I liked this thread. Didn't you? Maybe it was because she was so good at it. But here, in the middle of July we will see how it goes! I hope we still have some activity and commentary!


message 2: by Heather (last edited Jul 11, 2018 06:38PM) (new)

Heather | 8544 comments

The land of miracles
Rene Magritte
1964


Christmas Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 95 comments There is a lot in this one! :)


message 4: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Carol ꧁꧂ wrote: "There is a lot in this one! :)"

I absolutely love Magritte. And I have picked out a theme, and have found other future pictures, but I don't know if I'm as discreet. This is the first one!

What do you think of Magritte and his work, Carol?


message 5: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I like Magritte a lot, too, but I’ve never seen this one before,


message 6: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Ruth wrote: "I like Magritte a lot, too, but I’ve never seen this one before,"

I have one of his coffee table books that I peruse periodically because I enjoy his work so much. I would like to read his biography sometime. In fact, Can anyone recommend a good biography book about Magritte?
But, like you, Ruth, I've never seen this one before, either. I like it!


message 7: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl I'll start up again in August.


message 8: by Heather (last edited Jul 11, 2018 06:59AM) (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Well, it's not exactly the next day yet for me (or some of you) but to go on with my theme for this month, I will post another picture.



Sleeping Gypsy
Henri Rausseau
1897


message 9: by Mark (new)

Mark André Looks familiar.


message 10: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Sleeping Gypsy, Henri Rousseau


message 11: by Mark (new)

Mark André Ruth wrote: "Sleeping Gypsy, Henri Rousseau"

Thank you. I realize now with the artist's name that it is probably a different painting I'm familiar with. I think what caught my attention is that the artist seems to use the same lion! - )


message 12: by Karen (new)

Karen  | 4 comments I've never seen this Magritte either, it's beautiful. He was way ahead of his time.


message 13: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments I missed being part of this. Thanks for starting the thread, Heather.

Sleeping Gypsy looks just amazing!


message 14: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments I agree Karen, there is no one quite like Magritte!

And you’re welcome Amalie!


message 15: by Mark (new)

Mark André I don't like the Magritte at all! The Rousseau is cool! - )


message 16: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Interesting Mark, so do you not like Surrealism at all? Or just Magritte? Or is it that it seems implausible?


message 17: by Mark (new)

Mark André Heather wrote: "Interesting Mark, so do you not like Surrealism at all? Or just Magritte? Or is it that it seems implausible?"

H'm? At this point, my remark is only for the one picture shown. - )


message 18: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments

Portrait of Lucha Maria, A Girl from Tehuacan
Frida Khalo
1942


message 19: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Ruth wrote: "Sleeping Gypsy, Henri Rousseau"

Thank you, Ruth. I forgot to post the name of the piece! I edited that post.


message 20: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I think I’ve got the theme!


message 21: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Ruth wrote: "I think I’ve got the theme!"

You know, for some reason I thought you might be the first to catch on, Ruth! It's not too difficult, you can reveal it if you would like, or wait a few days to see if anyone else figures it out...

Good for you!


message 22: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments I think I got the theme as well :) I am not going to reveal it. I want to see more pictures.

I love Khalo's painting. I have never seen that before. The sun and the moon reminds me of the Aztec Myth. In the background, there are the Pyramids of the Sun and Moon. The patterns in the girls coat. It's a celebration of culture. It's so nice.


message 23: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments


The Moon Woman
Jackson Pollock
1942


message 24: by Mark (last edited Jul 11, 2018 07:07PM) (new)

Mark André I guess the simplest way to decide about a painting that's new to me, this is new, is to ask myself would I want to hang it in my house. Answer: No. - )
So I'm two for two. I like both the Rousseau and Kahlo and don't want the Magritte and the Pollock around. The theme thing eludes me. - )


message 25: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments That's one way to decide about how you feel about a painting...

I think many things, whether I like it or not has many facets. Comparisons. For example, I don't care for Pollock's work very much. But I can appreciate the above painting much more than his splat paintings. I just don't get those and they do nothing for me.

That's another thing, if I understand something. And that is not necessarily if I get what the artist is trying to portray, but if it shows me something. About myself, about the world (in a politically charged work, for example), or in the case of Surrealism, if it makes me think.

And that gets deeper into my sensations toward a painting or piece of art. How do I feel? Where does it take my mind? Has this changed some way I think or feel about something? As in the case of Damien Hirst, I don't care for his work at all but it does make me feel something. (Mostly disgust) And if a piece of art invokes any sort of sensation, I can appreciate it but not necessarily 'like' it.


message 26: by Mark (new)

Mark André H'm? I don't look for my Art to educate or inform me. I prefer to be entertained. I prefer the beautiful. I like complexity and radiance and sophistication.
I looked up Surrealism in my old text book: I like Dali, and Klee, and Miro. - )


message 27: by Ruth (last edited Jul 12, 2018 07:39AM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I try to keep my personal taste separate from my evaluation of a work of art. Personal taste is to idiosyncratic to base anything on. Say you don’t like lobster, or bread, or spinach would you then consider them bad food?


message 28: by Mark (new)

Mark André I base all my decisions of Art on personal taste. It's all I have. But tastes can change with experience. My tastes are much more sophisticated today than 30 years ago. I use spinach as an example when I fight with people who don't like Ulysses. I tell them that whether or not they like spinach is irrelevant. The virtue of spinach are long establish and unassailable. The same goes for the book. - )


message 29: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments I see what you are saying, Ruth. I think I wouldn’t have a choice in any other way to look at art than I do now, maybe due to the fact that I’m not artistically inclined? I wouldn’t know ‘good’ art, I guess, because I wouldn’t know what to look for to make it good (or bad).

I can think of perhaps an analogy, I’ve played the piano for almost 40 years. While I play I get frustrated when I make a mistake and feel embarrassed if performing in front of someone. If that person doesn’t know how to play the piano, they usually can’t even hear me make a mistake because they wouldn’t know how it’s supposed to go otherwise. But if they, too, play the piano, especially the same piece, they would observe my error. Does that make sense?

You are much more educated and exposed to art than I am so I think you would be better at knowing ‘good’ art than I would. So I have to just go by my sensations and thoughts regarding individual pieces.

I don’t want to assume anything, but is that kind of what you are saying Mark?


message 30: by Mark (last edited Jul 12, 2018 06:40AM) (new)

Mark André Let's see. There is so much Art out there: books, classical music recordings, and pictures of paintings and sculptures that we will never have time to get to them all; so we enjoy what we like. Personal taste is a tricky subject: it's subjective. My tastes in music and art and literature are much different than they were 35 years ago! My knowledge is broader, from experience; and my discernment is more refined, I guess, because of the wisdom that comes with age; coupled with experience. There are a lot of things I like today that I know I would not have appreciated when I was younger. That just seems to be how it works. I have no talents or special training. I study and enjoy art just for fun. My experience has been that the 'mind" continues to demand "new" entertainments: you discover something new, you consume it, eventually you become jaded with it and move on to something new again. Some of the late Beethoven and late Shostakovich string quartets took years, in some cases, to become friendly with. My love of Vermeer is probably only 15 years now; and I just discovered Cycladic sculpture last year. So we grow with interest and with time. I still don't like the Pollock: the colors are garish and the figure is grotesque. And I find the Magritte flat and dull. But that's just me. - )


message 31: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments

The Harvest Moon
Samuel Palmer
1833

"Samuel Palmer sought spiritual fulfillment outside of traditional religious doctrine, instead revering nature as evidence of divine creation. He transformed familiar motifs, such as trees, valleys, peasants, and the night sky, into visionary landscapes. In The Harvest Moon, Palmer portrayed laborers bundling sheaves of corn into the night, an agricultural practice that was common at the time during harvest season. But the composition is not simply a naturalistic representation of peasant labor; bathed in the celestial amber light of the full moon and painted in an unpretentious style, the scene assumes a mystical quality. The ghostly bodies of the peasants express none of the toil of their labor but rather seem to dance with the rhythm of nature."/>

http://interactive.britishart.yale.ed...



message 32: by Mark (new)

Mark André Cool! I discovered the theme!! An ever popular one too. - )


message 33: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Good job, Mark!


message 34: by Mark (new)

Mark André Heather wrote: "Good job, Mark!"
Thanks! But it took five pictures. That must be a low score. - )


message 35: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments You`se all moonstruck. As for the Pollock, that series is my favorite in 20th c. art, excluding DiChirico`s work. Its companion piece was the inspiration for the only successful acrylice painting I ever did and that is not saying much, (about my painting, not Pollack`s). I agree wholeheartedly with Heather on that one. The drips are drippy and facile. His earlier work in the 40`s was stupendous. Why did he ever have to switch direction? I don`t like them and don`t recognize their worth, to put it in Mark`s terms. That the art world embraced them was so much lemmings, (lemons) racing to the sea.


message 36: by Heather (last edited Jul 12, 2018 12:14PM) (new)

Heather | 8544 comments I got a message from a friend with a suggestion on how to increase the 'challenge' of this thread. We'll see how it works, I'll try it and you tell me what you think.

In addition to having a theme for the month (which mine was relatively easy), I am going to associate a word with either the theme or art in general and you can guess the word. When you think you know the word associated with the painting or theme, please comment with a spoiler so it doesn't reveal it to others who would like to guess.

I will post another painting now and have picked a word to associate with the painting or theme. I welcome feedback on this new idea!

(For those not as familiar with HTML, to post a spoiler, see the suggestions found above this comment box in greet printing that says (some html is ok) It is similar to creating italics and bold or underline. Only write the word spoiler between the open and close arrows with a back slash before the second open arrow (does that make sense? Can anyone explain this better?) Hopefully the above written in green suggestions explain how to post a spoiler better than I can. )


message 37: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments

Fire, Full Moon
Paul Klee
1930s

He plays with space in an interesting way in this piece. He uses different shapes to create a visual illusion. When the painting is looked at directly, it appears that it is in motion.

http://www.paul-klee.org/fire-full-moon/

What word did I associate with this painting or theme? Remember to post your word in a spoiler!


message 38: by Mark (new)

Mark André Heather wrote: "Fire, Full Moon
Paul Klee
1930s

He plays with space in an interesting way in this piece. He uses different shapes to create a visual illusion. When the painting is looked at directly, it appears t..."

Ah! Now there's a painting I could find a wall for! - )


message 39: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments

Man and Woman Contemplating the Moon
Caspar David Friedrich
1824

Fun Facts:

1. Friedrich created several paintings with this same general theme and composition. The most well-known of the other versions is “Man and Woman Contemplating the Moon” (1824), which even features the same tree.

2. The first owner, Dr. Otto Friedrich Rosenberg, received the painting from the artist himself in exchange for medical attention. The good doctor can rest in peace knowing he received adequate payment for his skill; in 1999, Artemis Fine Arts (NY) purchased the painting at Christie’s (London) for £771,500 (~$1,277,000).

3. Friedrich is considered by many to be Germany’s greatest Romantic painter, although at the time of his death, he had been mostly forgotten. Only with the rise of Symbolism, in the late 19th century, did people begin to fully appreciate his work.

http://www.artistsandart.org/2009/07/...


message 40: by Mark (new)

Mark André I find the slanted tree intrusive in the Friedrich. It's Creepy.
A single word to describe the Klee? Bold. Present. Friendly. Cool.
The title says it best. - )


message 41: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I'm sure it's meant to be creepy, and to grab attention.


message 42: by Mark (new)

Mark André And it succeeds, but i find the effect distressing.


message 43: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Gottfried Helnwein (sp?) is distressing! I’m not even going to post any of that!


message 44: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments It`s not so much the tree but its roots that are distressing. The tree is hovering over what would be a ravine or abyss outside and to the right of the image and the roots are coyly threatening the couple to the travesty of the tree`s fall, all the while their ideal romanticism in contemplating the moon.

Heavy piece,


message 45: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments But why a yellow moon?


message 46: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Great analysis Geoffrey!


message 47: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Mark wrote: "I find the slanted tree intrusive in the Friedrich. It's Creepy.
A single word to describe the Klee? Bold. Present. Friendly. Cool.
The title says it best. - )"


I find this to be a minor Klee. I prefer his with the organic feel to them. He is way underestimated INHO


message 48: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Going with your analysis, yellow vs white...it’s not quite right. As in the painting, something is not quite ‘right’ in the painting as a whole. The tree threatening the romantic couple. The tree is not quite picturesque.


message 49: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments What is INHO?


message 50: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments A very disturbing painting and a very strong one at that. I have read about him but never saw any of his work. I love your message threads, Heather, in that I am introduced to so much great art not in the history books. It makes me wish I had gone on for a masters in art history that my profs had strongly encouraged me in doing. Meanwhile I am working on an essay about the influence of pre-Hispanic Maya art on contemporary practitioners. Unfortunately it is not as pervasive as I originally envisioned, but there is still an undercurrent there. Sorry to get off this tangent, but it has obsessed me now for a month.


« previous 1 3 4
back to top