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General Discussion > Valancourt Goes International

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Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
We're in the process of putting together something exciting, starting in early 2019: a new Valancourt series dedicated to neglected classics in other languages. The first two titles are both from Belgium: Felix Timmermans' 1910 collection of gloomy and Gothic tales Intimations of Death, translated by today's foremost Dutch translator, Paul Vincent, and Hubert Lampo's 1960 novel The Coming of Joachim Stiller, a classic of magical realism and the supernatural in which a journalist finds himself menaced by the strange Joachim Stiller, who may be a modern-day madman, a 16th-century religious heretic, a man killed in a WWII bombing raid, or all of the above.

description

Future titles in the series will reflect Valancourt's commitment to publishing neglected classics, horror/supernatural fiction, and LGBT-interest titles. As always, suggestions or requests are welcome and appreciated. You can recommend titles via our website, Facebook page, or here on Goodreads.


message 2: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments I can't wait. Seriously ... cannot .... wait.

This is great!!


message 3: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 1 comments Valancourt Books wrote: "We're in the process of putting together something exciting, starting in early 2019: a new Valancourt series dedicated to neglected classics in other languages. The first two titles are both from B..."

Really exciting news! Will the titles be available internationally?


message 4: by Maria (new)

Maria | 1 comments This sounds really interesting :)


message 5: by Char (new)

Char  | 330 comments Very cool! Congratulations, you guys!


Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
Joseph wrote: "Valancourt Books wrote: "We're in the process of putting together something exciting, starting in early 2019: a new Valancourt series dedicated to neglected classics in other languages. The first t..."

They should all be available worldwide. At least that's the plan!


message 7: by Marie-Therese (new)

Marie-Therese (mariethrse) | 4 comments Really looking forward to these!


message 8: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly (kimberly_3238) | 372 comments Great news!!!


message 9: by Sirensongs (new)

Sirensongs | 11 comments This is a super exciting development! Yet another reason to love Valancourt Books!


message 10: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments I LOVE this development! I'll definitely be purchasing both forthcoming titles. As for suggestions, Flemish/Belgian fiction seems to be a goldmine of horror and the supernatural. Authors whose work I'd love to see in this series: Jean Ray, Franz Hellens, and Thomas Owen. Many thanks!!!!!


message 11: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments Not to steal Valancourt's thunder here, but Wakefield is on the edge of publishing Jean Ray's Whiskey Tales if you're at all interested.


message 12: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments Thanks for the tip, Nancy--instantly added to my wants list! According to the Amazon description from the back cover copy of Whiskey Tales, Wakefield will also be publishing Cruise of Shadows and Circles of Terror next, followed by "many volumes" of Ray's work. Glad he's being finally widely translated into English. So now I suggest just Owen and Hellens for the Valancourt International Series. I'm sure there's a ton of non-English weird fiction out there waiting to be translated!


message 13: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Nancy wrote: "Not to steal Valancourt's thunder here, but Wakefield is on the edge of publishing Jean Ray's Whiskey Tales if you're at all interested."

I've been waiting for several months of delays on that XD


message 14: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Valancourt Books wrote: "We're in the process of putting together something exciting, starting in early 2019: a new Valancourt series dedicated to neglected classics in other languages. The first two titles are both from B..."

Okay that looks great and makes me annoyed I haven't gotten around to learning Dutch yet.


message 15: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments David wrote: "Nancy wrote: "Not to steal Valancourt's thunder here, but Wakefield is on the edge of publishing Jean Ray's Whiskey Tales if you're at all interested."

I've been waiting for severa..."


same here. But I did pre-order this Valancourt book!


message 16: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments my error. I preordered The Coming of Joachim Stiller.


message 17: by Valancourt Books (new)

Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
Brucifer wrote: "Thanks for the tip, Nancy--instantly added to my wants list! According to the Amazon description from the back cover copy of Whiskey Tales, Wakefield will also be publishing Cruise of Shadows and C..."

Thanks, Brucifer. I'll take a look at those two authors.


message 18: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments If you haven't yet picked it up, I recommend picking up a copy of Horror Needs No Passport: 20th Century Horror Literature Outside thee U.S. and U.K. Although I wish it went back to the beginnings of horror literature by including a section on the pre-20th century, this book is a goldmine of horror information, many of the authors included yet to be translated. I won't go wild making recommendations for the new series, but I'd love to add author to the list: Karl Hans Strobl (Austrian author; see http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?1...).


message 19: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Brucifer wrote: "If you haven't yet picked it up, I recommend picking up a copy of Horror Needs No Passport: 20th Century Horror Literature Outside thee U.S. and U.K. Although I wish it went back to the beginnings ..."

Wait someone else recommended Strobl and it wasn't my evil alter ego ? : O


message 20: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments I've heard that "The Head" is a horror classic, though now I see from just reading his entry in Supernatural Literature of the World that he later became a "prominent" Nazi, just as did another major Germanic horror writer from the early 20th century, Hanns Heinz Ewers (though apparently the Nazis booted Ewers out, as he did not agree with anti-Semitism and was gay). That makes me want to take a few steps back my Strobl suggestion and put out the controversial question: What do others think of the merits and demerits of translating/reprinting the apparently excellent work of these horror writers when they later proved to be horrific themselves?


message 21: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Brucifer wrote: "I've heard that "The Head" is a horror classic, though now I see from just reading his entry in Supernatural Literature of the World that he later became a "prominent" Nazi, just as did another maj..."

I've only read his short stories from "Die Knöcherne Hand" which are all weird or pleasingly gothic, one of my favourite being the tale of surviving for a week on an island with an insane lighthouse keeper.

I mostly read his novels, such as his 700 page "Eleagabal Kuperus" or his "Umsturtz in Jenseits". I have youtube reviews up for either if you'd be interested.

Also I'd not called Ewers a Nazi, though Strobl definitely was, but mostly active in literary administration.


message 22: by Nancy (last edited Feb 14, 2019 06:07AM) (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments Brucifer wrote: "If you haven't yet picked it up, I recommend picking up a copy of Horror Needs No Passport: 20th Century Horror Literature Outside thee U.S. and U.K. Although I wish it went back to the beginnings ..."

I just wanted to thank you for the reference. My copy came in yesterday and then I bought Nevins' The Encyclopedia of Fantastic Victoriana.


message 23: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments You're very welcome! It's well done, isn't it? I still wish it went back prior to the 20th century. It does sometimes for background on the fantastic literature of non-European countries, especially those with very long literary histories (Japan, China, India), but not so much for Continental Europe. For instance, it doesn't mention some writers who are also missing from the Supernatural Literature of the World encyclopedia (e.g., Italy's Iginio Ugo Tarchetti, Spain's Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, and Serbia's Milovan Glisic). But it's hard to believe he managed to dig up all of the information he did. I think I need a copy of the Victoriana Encyclopedia, so thank you!


message 24: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments Brucifer wrote: "You're very welcome! It's well done, isn't it? I still wish it went back prior to the 20th century. It does sometimes for background on the fantastic literature of non-European countries, especiall..."

I didn't know about Supernatural Literature of the World 3 Volumes : An Encyclopedia so thanks! Hell, I don't need to eat next month. :)


message 25: by David (new)

David | 42 comments One suggestion I could make in general would be to turn towards Italian writers opf the weird.

I've run across a few who got translated into German in the first half of the 20th century, but a lot of the writers of the "golden age" of the weird (end of the 19th century to about the 1920's) remain virtually obscure since Italian isn't a language that many people really learn.

Maybe not on the level of Hungarian of course, but still not very common : P


message 26: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments Brucifer wrote: "You're very welcome! It's well done, isn't it? I still wish it went back prior to the 20th century. It does sometimes for background on the fantastic literature of non-European countries, especiall..."

Eating is overrated when there are books!


message 27: by Valancourt Books (new)

Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
David wrote: "One suggestion I could make in general would be to turn towards Italian writers opf the weird.

I've run across a few who got translated into German in the first half of the 20th century, but a lot..."



One half of the Valancourt team (not me) is fluent in many languages so if you have any Italian recommendations let me know, David! I'm making him read as quickly as he can. :) He's taking Hungarian classes on iTalki so eventually he may be able to read some of that too.


message 28: by David (last edited Feb 17, 2019 10:57PM) (new)

David | 42 comments Valancourt Books wrote: "David wrote: "One suggestion I could make in general would be to turn towards Italian writers opf the weird.

I've run across a few who got translated into German in the first half of the 20th cent..."


Admittedly I've not read any of him since the only non italian edition of his stuff came out in an undigitised German translation, but I still heard good things about Carlo Dadone.

In the German anthology "Die Jagd auf Menschen", his work is compared to that of Poe and Hoffman, and there is one of his stories translated in German therein, his "Unüberwindlich".

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/die-...


message 29: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 3 comments I'm gonna put in a request for Yumeno Kyuusaku's DOGURA MAGURA, one of the precursors to Japanese science fiction. Per Wikipedia:

Dogra Magra exemplifies modern Japanese avant-garde gothic literature. In the story, the protagonist/narrator wakes up in a hospital with amnesia. He finds out that he was the subject of an experiment by a now-dead psychiatrist, and the doctors are working to bring back his memories. It is not clear whether he was a psychotic killer or the victim of a strange psychological experiment, but it is told that he killed his mother and wife and that he inherited his psychotic tendencies from an insane ancestor.


From what I've read about the story, it's sort of a literary equivalent to The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.


message 30: by Valancourt Books (new)

Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
Sean wrote: "I'm gonna put in a request for Yumeno Kyuusaku's DOGURA MAGURA, one of the precursors to Japanese science fiction. Per Wikipedia:

Dogra Magra exemplifies modern Japanese avant-gard..."


Sounds interesting. I'll take a look at it.


message 31: by David (new)

David | 42 comments I have another example I'd really like to sink my teeth into. In 1886 Catulle Mendès wrote "Zo'har ", a fin de siecle novel about an incestuous relationship that Robert Ziegler's wrote a lengthy essay about in his "Asymptote: An Approach to Decadent Fiction", having very high praise for it. So far it has never appeared in English as far as I know

https://books.google.com/books?id=Pfl...


message 32: by Ross (new)

Ross Scott-Buccleuch | 12 comments Snuggly Books have brought out a Catulle Mendès book, with more on the way apparently.


message 33: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Ross wrote: "Snuggly Books have brought out a Catulle Mendès book, with more on the way apparently."

I know about their previous book and I know they have two other books by Mendes planned but neither of them is Zo'har.


message 34: by Valancourt Books (new)

Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
I'm not familiar with it but I'll give it a look, David. Thanks!

I'll check out the release from Snuggly too.


message 35: by Anthony (last edited Mar 14, 2019 05:28PM) (new)

Anthony Vacca | 7 comments Have you fine folks at Valancourt considered putting together some English-language releases of the writings of Edogawa Rampo?


message 36: by Saffron Moon (new)

Saffron Moon | 10 comments Such exciting news! I have ordered via Amazon The Coming of Joachim Stiller, but Intimations of Death is not yet listed on Amazon, so I will have to wait until it pops up.

I am really looking forward to this new series!! A few notable non-English authors that I would love to discover (hint hint) are: Alexander Grin, especially the title Jessie a Morgiana, Erckmann-Chatrian, Hanns Heinz Ewers and Jean Ray.

Also completely off topic, I would also love to read more forgotten, neglected, obscure women writers and/or female themed stories if possible.

I will leave you with my sincerest appreciation for your publishing vision and all your efforts. I absolutely love what you're doing and will continue to gobble up your books as fast as I can get my greedy little fingers on them! Thank you!


message 37: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Anthony wrote: "Have you fine folks at Valancourt considered putting together some English-language releases of the writings of Edogawa Rampo?"

I have the one English collection from Tuttle. I liked most of it, bar the criminous tales which aren't exactly something I seek out.

I wonder if there's enough weird tales by Rampo to warrant a standalone edition. I mean, the man's pseudonym is based on Poe for crissake XD


message 38: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 296 comments David wrote: "Anthony wrote: "Have you fine folks at Valancourt considered putting together some English-language releases of the writings of Edogawa Rampo?"

I have the one English collection from Tuttle. I lik..."


He's pretty widely translated and books are available other than the Tuttle (which is a good volume). I also have a couple printed by Kurodahan: The Edogawa Rampo Reader and The Black Lizard and Beast in the Shadows. The "criminous" tales were his big thing but he has done kaiki - (strange/uncanny) as well.


message 39: by David (last edited Mar 15, 2019 03:28PM) (new)

David | 42 comments Nancy wrote: "David wrote: "Anthony wrote: "Have you fine folks at Valancourt considered putting together some English-language releases of the writings of Edogawa Rampo?"

I have the one English collection from..."


So how many crime/mystery stories do these have on average ? As I don't really like the idea of reading six or seven murder mysteries to then maybe get two short weird stories mixed in.

I'm really not a mystery person. I remember wondering why people like Wakefield bothered putting in low grade criminous stories in collections like "They Return at Evening". If you're obviously so much better at something else, do we really need you to insert a twenty page story about how someone extricated a bullet from a tree ?

The same with the Rampo one. The cover contains a humanoid chair, why include a story about a guy planting fake finger prints, or another one about giving association word tests to potential murder suspects ? It's like when Hodgson inserted scooby doo style fake ghosts into Carnacki (which is why I never read the thing in full yet) only without even the *fake* ghost.


message 40: by Robert Adam (new)

Robert Adam Gilmour | 23 comments There is another Rampo book in English, but under the alternate name translation "Ranpo". Strange Tale Of Panorama Island from University Of Hawaii Press. And no, it's not the graphic novel version, it's the actual book.


message 41: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Robert Adam wrote: "There is another Rampo book in English, but under the alternate name translation "Ranpo". Strange Tale Of Panorama Island from University Of Hawaii Press. And no, it's not the graphic novel version..."

Thanks, seems interesting.


message 42: by Brucifer (new)

Brucifer | 7 comments Here’s another idea for the series: the ghost stories of Rabindranath Tagore. Nobel Prize winner Tagore apparently enjoyed supplementing writing his poetry and social realist fiction with ghost stories. Although he wrote them throughout his career, few have been translated into English from Bengali. A collection of these (as complete as possible) would be groundbreaking.

The ghostly/surreal stories of Premendra Mitra also look really interesting. Mitra was a prominent Bengali writer from the 30s to the 80s, and like Tagore he wrote horror stories throughout his career, ranging from traditional ghost stories to surreal/expressionistic ones, according to the Horror Needs No Passport book.


message 43: by David (new)

David | 42 comments Brucifer wrote: "Here’s another idea for the series: the ghost stories of Rabindranath Tagore. Nobel Prize winner Tagore apparently enjoyed supplementing writing his poetry and social realist fiction with ghost sto..."

Interesting idea, but would probably involve a lot more expensive negotiations and securing of translators since I don't assume they have someone who can professionaly translate Bengali.


message 44: by Valancourt Books (new)

Valancourt Books (valancourt_books) | 900 comments Mod
Brucifer wrote: "Here’s another idea for the series: the ghost stories of Rabindranath Tagore. Nobel Prize winner Tagore apparently enjoyed supplementing writing his poetry and social realist fiction with ghost sto..."

I'll take a look at the few that are translated to get an idea. Thanks, Brucifer!


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