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July 2018: Dystopian > Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury (5/5)

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message 1: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Lin | 49 comments Fahrenheit 451 was my secondary school reader. I was only taught the first two part so this is the first time I finished the whole book. The story is about a fireman (whose job was to burn book instead of putting out fire), who got confused about his job and his life. This book is written out of concern about censorship, but it is also a reflection about modern life. A really excellent masterpiece. The best book I've read this year so far.


message 2: by Nicole R (new)

Nicole R (drnicoler) | 7784 comments Ooo...excellent selection for this month's tag! This is such a great book!

This was made into an HBO movie that came out earlier this year. It actually didn't get awesome reviews (sounds like the book set a high bar that the movie just could not reach), but I still may check it out one of these days.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNKwe...


message 3: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Lin | 49 comments I think the movie has made a lot of changes to the original plot to make it appeal to the audiences. I didn't watch it, but it seems like another regular Hollywood movie.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Wow, I read this in high school. That was a long time ago.:) I remember liking it way back when. I should read it again. It is a classic.


message 5: by Amy N. (new)

Amy N. | 256 comments I never did read that one (always meant to, never got around to it), but I watched the 1966 movie back in high school and I quite liked it. I've heard disappointing things about the HBO movie, so I will probably steer clear.


message 6: by Karin (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Sharon wrote: "I think the movie has made a lot of changes to the original plot to make it appeal to the audiences. I didn't watch it, but it seems like another regular Hollywood movie."

Thanks, I'll skip the movie because I liked this book both times I read it, which means it stood the test of time and I don't need it spoiled.


message 7: by Karin (new)

Karin | 7470 comments PS This one IS dystopian!!!


message 8: by Jason (new)

Jason Oliver | 2098 comments I struggled with this book. I was in high school when I read it but I had to start it 5 times. I am not a Bradbury fan.


message 9: by Hebah (new)

Hebah (quietdissident) | 675 comments All the inevitable comparisons to movie versions are entertaining in light of Bradbury's initial inspiration--that of "a story about how television destroys interest in reading literature."

It's also an interesting study in how much can be read into a story beyond authorial intent.


message 10: by Karin (last edited Jul 05, 2018 05:09PM) (new)

Karin | 7470 comments Hebah wrote: "All the inevitable comparisons to movie versions are entertaining in light of Bradbury's initial inspiration--that of "a story about how television destroys interest in reading literature."

It's a..."


True, but he really did set up a dystopian society while meeting his goal. He didn't have to have firemen and books being illegal, but he really did get into the thought control aspect of it even if it wasn't as strong as the 1984 thought control. While I'm not longer the huge Bradbury fan I was when growing up (I was really into scifi among other things from age 10 through my teen years), I still like this one. There are many ways he could have spun a tale about how television destroying interest in reading literature.

Dystopian novels weren't originally set up just to entertain with a dystopian society, but to pass on opinions. The first ones were political (We and Anthem. I haven't read We yet, but Anthem has some interesting things to say about the loss of identity, etc, when the first person pronoun has been eliminated, etc, and bear in mind she escaped communist USSR).

Others were really into mind and thought control, later environmental catastrophes and other things came in. The Hunger Games concept came up when Collins was watching TV and switching between something on the Viet Nam War and a reality show and so it started with the game aspect and, now I'm making my thought, obviously for that to work you'd need a dystopian society.

There have been real dystopian societies and are some today, so what separates the fiction genre? Just a thought.


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