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F2F Book Discussions > F2F79: July 2018 | Classics

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message 1: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Hello, everyone! I’m Mawi, your moderator for July. Clearly, we have managed to successfully pull through with the new discussion format for the first half of the year! So, yey!! And with that, we start the second half of the year with a discussion of outstanding, enduring literary classics.

As with the previous months, just pick a book or books categorized as classic here in Goodreads and let’s talk about them here this month! I will be posting questions here to guide our discourse, and I hope to see you all in the F2F discussion at the end of the month where we further talk about the books we read and anything else. :D

Right then, let’s begin!

Week 1 Questions:
1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?


message 2: by Rain (last edited Jul 04, 2018 12:43AM) (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 12 comments Hello! I'm new at TFG, I just joined few days ago.

Week 1 Questions:
1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
I will be reading The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare. I chose it mainly because ever since I asked my godfather to give his copy to me years ago, I have yet to read it.

2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?

A classic is considered a work that is extremely good and relevant despite being in existence for years, decades and even centuries. Books are considered classic when it represents the period of time it was created, influences subsequent works, and continually and consistently respected and reviewed by critics.


message 3: by Elaine (last edited Jul 03, 2018 04:27PM) (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 227 comments Week 1 Questions:
1. I will be reading The Secret Garden by Fances Hodgson Burnett

2. Classic books are works that transcend interest through time. These are works that usually make a lasting impact/statement through effective language, and the theme universal such that it can affect people of all culture/generation regardless of when it was written and its genre.

Categorizing books as classics has been a topic for discussion for quite a time. Maybe they have been in print for long time? Or literary critics have all agreed that a book is good? I'm not really sure about the criteria. Hehe.

**O ayan, sumagot na ako sa discussion. Return the favor sa September ha! Wahaha :P


message 4: by Monique (last edited Jul 03, 2018 05:15PM) (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments (view spoiler)

Week 1 Questions:
1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
- I'll be reading Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South because (a) I've been meaning to read it for a long time already and (b) Ronnie highly recommends it, especially if you watch the adaptation with Richard Armitage in it. Lol.

2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?
- A classic is a book that is not contemporary. Ehe. A classic is a book that was published before and in the 20th century and early 21st. There might be "modern classics" or "po-mo classics" but I can safely say that "classics" are those written by mostly dead authors and published before or on the 20th century and early 21st century. (Yes, I judge by age. Hehe.)


message 5: by Ravenchild (new)

Ravenchild Gardens | 14 comments Wuthering Heights coz Sandra Bullock mentioned it:) 2 Classic quotes: 1) A classic is a book praised but never read. 2) A classic exhausts the possibilities of its medium or genre. In that sense, it can't help being compared to every new book trying to excel what it is accomplishing with every new reader.


message 6: by Veronica (new)

Veronica | 734 comments Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm reading Middlemarch because any self-respecting reader who calls herself a fan of dead British women writers ought to have read it.

2. Some say a book that continues to be read 50 years after publishing is on its way to becoming a classic.
- Others say that it is continually included in literary canons or in books-other-people-say-I-should-read lists.
- My favorite is from Italo Calvino. He says a classic is readable and it invites re-reading. And with each reading, one is never left indifferent. Something like that.


message 7: by Karen (new)

Karen Tamayo | 1 comments 1. I'm currently reading The Phantom of the Opera. I have a personal method on selecting the next book that I'll read and it's the one that I picked out..

2. Classics...hmmm, books that passed the test of time..


message 8: by Abdul (last edited Jul 05, 2018 04:17PM) (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 58 comments Week 1 Questions:

1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
I'll be reading the classic 1987 Philippine Constitution. Just kidding.
I chose the 1764 classic The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole. The reason is I've been meaning to read it ever since I read Michael Moorcock underline how important it is in the development of (fantastic) fiction. (view spoiler) So, that's cool I guess.

2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?
You all have said it better than I ever can.

Classics are books written long, long ago by very dead, quite dead, definitely, positively dead people, people whom we cannot leave well enough alone so that they may peacefully rest, snug in their graves or under our beds. These books are somehow still A Big Deal today for a variety of reasons, some of which are: (1) their place in the development of fiction, (2) their place in the history of a real place, and (3) the teacher has not yet read a new book to assign the students.


message 9: by Earnest (new)

Earnest | 12 comments 1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
I'll be reading The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. I've liked his books before and have been meaning to read more.

2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?
I think a classic is something that has been enjoyed still by many generations of readers.


message 10: by Aaron Vincent (new)

Aaron Vincent (aaronvincent) | 2053 comments Week 1 Questions:
1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
I'm reading Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights. It's the classic novel that caught my attention when we were book browsing at NBS after the previous F2F discussion.

2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?
A classic is any work of art that withstand the test of time.


message 11: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Great selection, guys!

Rain: Welcome to TFG! We hope to see you in the F2F later this month! :)

Elaiiine: Salamat sa pagsagot. Hahaha! Looking forward to discussing Mary Lennox's deep shit musings. :P

Monique: Is that the miniseries adaptation with the pre-Hobbit Armitage? Ooh, ganda nga 'yan, from what I remember. :)

Ravenchild: Oh, Wuthering Heights is ace! Hope you can join us in the F2F! :)

Karen: I have never thought of reading The Phantom of the Opera, simply because I have seen many adaptations of it. Hehe. I hope you can share your thoughts on it with us in the F2F! :)

Abdul: Looooove your super funny answer!!! I literally laughed out loud! And, yes, paki-discuss with us the Philippine Constitution. :P

Earnest: "...enjoyed still by many generations of readers." As in you liking the works of Dostoyevsky! :D

Beshyyy: Enjoy the (view spoiler) drama of Cathy and Heathcliff! :D


message 12: by Mawi (last edited Jul 10, 2018 09:08AM) (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Ms. Ronnie: Thank you for mentioning Calvino's thoughts on literary classics. I chanced upon it when I was reading about the genre. I liked it too and he was very thorough! Which brings us to the next discussion point:

Week 2 Questions:

If you've been reading all comments on this thread, Ms. Ronnie mentioned Italo Calvino's thoughts on what makes a classic a classic and why we should read them. He wrote an entire essay on it. Here it is, if you want to check it out. One of the points Calvino mentioned was this:

The classics are the books of which we usually hear people say: “I am rereading…” and never “I am reading….” ...to read a great book for the first time in one’s maturity is an extraordinary pleasure, different from (though one cannot say greater or lesser than) the pleasure of having read it in one’s youth. Youth brings to reading, as to any other experience, a particular flavor and a particular sense of importance, whereas in maturity one appreciates (or ought to appreciate) many more details and levels and meanings.

What are your thoughts on this? Are there classic books you've read before whose meanings or significance for you have changed upon rereading?


message 13: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 12 comments Mawi wrote: "Great selection, guys!

Rain: Welcome to TFG! We hope to see you in the F2F later this month! :)

Elaiiine: Salamat sa pagsagot. Hahaha! Looking forward to discussing Mary Lennox's deep shit musin..."


Thank you Mawi!

description
Wouldn't want to miss meeting you guys by the end of the month.


message 14: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 12 comments Mawi wrote: "Ms. Ronnie: Thank you for mentioning Calvino's thoughts on literary classics. I chanced upon it when I was reading about the genre. I liked it too and he was very thorough! Which brings us to the n..."

I absolutely agree. For one, I felt a particularly different kind of pleasure when I had the chance to read Victor Hugo's Les Miserables Les Misérables by Victor Hugo in 2015. I feel like I may fail to understand the book have I read it when I was younger since I do not possess yet enough maturity, experiences and knowledge on the French Revolution to understand what the main characters were going through --except for Cosette, of course. And, yes, it was very different from the pleasure I felt when I first read Antoine de Saint-Exupery's The Little Prince The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry out of duty when I was in 13 years old as opposed to the time I reread it when I turned 24 years old. It amused and weirded me out when I realized that my personal rapport shifted from the little prince to the narrator of the novella. Rereading it made me appreciate the book more and got me all of these feels inside which I cannot say are greater nor lesser than what I felt after reading the classics for the first time now as an adult.


message 15: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Week 2 Questions

First, I'm not a fan of rereading. So unless I'm forced to, which rarely happens anyway, I don't really reread. Second, I can't recall a classic that I read when I was young that I read when I was older. There's The Wizard of Oz, a classic children's book that I read to my daughter last year which also happens to be my favorite book of all time, but I think the Calvino quote did not really contemplate juvenile classics especially when he mentioned "many more details and levels and meanings".

I think youth and/or maturity should not be a factor in order to properly appreciate a classic work, should it? Because if I were to reread, say, Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse or Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities, I would probably appreciate more "details and levels and meanings." But I've read those not in my "youth" but in my "mature" years. So no, I don't agree with Calvino. Lol. But tell me if I'm missing the point, please.


message 16: by Earnest (new)

Earnest | 12 comments Week 2
I don't really do much rereading either as life is short and novels are long, but i think that when rereading certian books at different points in you interpret things differently and look at it at different points of view😀


message 17: by Meliza (new)

Meliza (mecawish) | 720 comments Week 1 Questions:

1. I'm reading The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings #1)
by J.R.R. Tolkien. Because it has the highest average rating categorized as a classic here in Goodreads from my to-read shelf. Also, maybe now's the right time to read it after my first failed attempt in highschool. I only read The Hobbit then.

2. A book that is really good, still relevant, still influences and been existing for years.


message 18: by Elaine (last edited Jul 13, 2018 06:45PM) (new)

Elaine (itslainee) | 227 comments Week 2 Question
I am not a fan of rereading because I have a long list of to-read books and I would rather move on and discover more meaningful works (unless if there would be a strong reason to compel me to). If I want to refresh my mind on a certain novel, I would read the synopsis to fill me in with the details than go back on the whole thing. Also, age should not be a factor in determining the appreciation and interpretation of a book's details, levels, and meaning. When you read a novel and it leaves a strong impression on you, sometimes you realize the (deeper?) meaning later on in life.


message 19: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments I see most of us here, myself included, are not fans of rereadings! :D And I totally agree with Earnest's "life is short and novels are long" sentiment. But I have to say that I agree with Calvino, especially about a reader's age and disposition affecting his/her judgment and appreciation of a story while reading it and upon rereading it at a different point in life. That maybe our life experiences and our interaction with the world, which influences our maturity, changes the way we feel and think about the stories we encounter. Also, maybe the reason why some of us find it hard to agree with Calvino is because we don't really do rereadings? :)


message 20: by Monagin (new)

Monagin (mdets) Week 1 Questions:
1. What classic book will you be reading this month? Why?
- I have less than a month to finish two books but I bet I'd finish them in no time. For this month, I am currently rereading The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and I will be rereading To Kill a Mockingbird shortly after. I chose them because of certain things that have happened in my life that made me want to visit the child in me and I thought it'd be nice to ponder on much I've grown since I just had my birthday not too long ago.
2. What is a classic? How are books considered classic?
- I think one can be called a classic if the art is timeless. Like I could still recommend to my future grandchildren The Little Prince or To Kill a Mockingbird.

Week 2 Questions:

If you've been reading all comments on this thread, Ms. Ronnie mentioned Italo Calvino's thoughts on what makes a classic a classic and why we should read them. He wrote an entire essay on it. Here it is, if you want to check it out. One of the points Calvino mentioned was this:

The classics are the books of which we usually hear people say: “I am rereading…” and never “I am reading….” ...to read a great book for the first time in one’s maturity is an extraordinary pleasure, different from (though one cannot say greater or lesser than) the pleasure of having read it in one’s youth. Youth brings to reading, as to any other experience, a particular flavor and a particular sense of importance, whereas in maturity one appreciates (or ought to appreciate) many more details and levels and meanings.

What are your thoughts on this? Are there classic books you've read before whose meanings or significance for you have changed upon rereading?

It was fun reading the comments before me. I actually enjoy rereading a few of the books in my bookshelf. Not all, but definitely a good three or four once in a while. For me, it's not so much as me learning new things but actually understanding the author more as much as I read them over the years. I was in third grade when I first read The Little Prince and to this day, is still my favorite book. I saw it not as a mere children's book but how a child is an adult just as an adult is also a child. I enjoy reading books written the way The Little Prince is written is because of the varying perspectives you can choose to see the story with. I have reread the book a good more than 10 times now. And I am sure I will still reread it a I grow older. It is the only book that is too worn down in my shelf. HAHA.

P.S. Hi guys! I am a newbie. Please be good to me. :) I just became a member. I was looking for Filipino Groups and found this. Yay!


message 21: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Hi, Monagin! Welcome to TFG!!! Do join us in the F2F later this month. Will post here when and where. :D Your answer is perfectly timed as we're just discussing the by-products of rereading. We hope you can share with us your impressions on the books you're reading now and what you thought of them when you first read them. :)


message 22: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Hello, everyone! I hope you're all making headway with your readings what with the weather giving us a perfect curl-up-and-read atmosphere. :D

Week 3
1. Just as a lot of today's authors are heavily influenced by the literary classics, what is your most-liked classic and why?
2. Most of us here mentioned that classics are works that endured the test of time, what then are modern classics? What literary works do you think qualifies as modern classic?


message 23: by Rain (new)

Rain (ame-desu) | 12 comments Mawi wrote: "Hello, everyone! I hope you're all making headway with your readings what with the weather giving us a perfect curl-up-and-read atmosphere. :D

Week 3
1. Just as a lot of today's authors are heavil..."


Week 3
1. Just as a lot of today's authors are heavily influenced by the literary classics, what is your most-liked classic and why?
My most-liked classic is Victor Hugo's Les Miserables Les Misérables by Victor Hugo because 1) it covered a lot of topics such as politics, morality, religion, familial love and of course, romance. 2) gave me a human perspective of 19th century France, most especially the French revolution.

2. Most of us here mentioned that classics are works that endured the test of time, what then are modern classics? What literary works do you think qualifies as modern classic?

I think, based on books that I have seen categorized under Modern Classics, that these are classic books that were produced at the turn of the 20th century.


message 24: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2127 comments Week 3

1. Just as a lot of today's authors are heavily influenced by the literary classics, what is your most-liked classic and why?
Aside from The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, which is both a children's book and classic work, my favorite classic novel is Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. The story of the four March sisters will always be a favorite.

2. Most of us here mentioned that classics are works that endured the test of time, what then are modern classics? What literary works do you think qualifies as modern classic?
Modern classics are fairly "young" but may already be considered as timeless. Does that make sense? Haha.


message 25: by Lik (new)

Lik C | 16 comments Hi! The topic of "Classics" is timely for me. I've been cleaning our mini-library at home, and decided to read on some old classic books, most which I haven't even read during my young adult days. I just did not get into it. I think I preferred exciting novels then ... like Nancy Drew (I was thinking, can Nancy Drew be considered as a classic? Maybe the character, but not the stories. I found out before that different writers are behind that Carolyn Keene pseudoname .. ). Sorry for the long introduction.

So to answer all the questions:

Classic Read this Month:
1. I've just finished The Secret Garden because we have this pretty picture book of this at home. Now, I'm reading Anne of Green Gables. I have an old copy which I never finished before.

What is a Classic?
2. Before I read there are weekly questions to be answered, I google-d "What is a literary classic?" Ha ha.
Anyway, I'd say a book is a classic if it has been taught in Reading class in school. It has been approved by teachers and must be known to all students (or so they think. But we trust them :D).

I'd say marketing and book publishers also contribute to labelling those books. Like my Anne of Green Gables has the heading "Wordsworth Classics".

But I'm still curious, is there an official criteria to book being a "classic"? Also, are there "classics" by Asian authors? I first thought of The Good Earth, but the author is not Asian. Pwede rin Noli Me Tangere.

On Calvino:
3. I agree and disagree with the rereading portion. Perhaps agree on some books like Anne of Green Gables. But disagree on other books... like To Kill A Mockingbird. I just didn't like it much.

I agree with 'maturity one appreciates many more details...'. As I said, when I was younger, I preferred fast paced novels. I wasn't into the classics where they would sit having a nice cup of tea and a good chat. Only when I grew older that I appreciated these little moments, relax and enjoy life. As Anne said, there are so many interesting things in life.

On Rereading
4. Anne of Green Gables - taught me to appreciate the little things in life, as simple as looking outside the window and having some quiet, and loving the company of friends. Also, letting go of "wordly things" and trying to minimize vanity.

I think it and Little Prince are the only classics I've read.

Most Liked Classic:
5. Little Women

Modern Classics
6. I'd say modern classics are those written after WWII. Okay, that got me thinking. Widely read may not be correct... such as Twilight? Can Twilight be considered a classic? I've run out of ideas.


Isn't it nice to read old yellowed books? :)


message 26: by Lik (new)

Lik C | 16 comments Ravenchild wrote: "Wuthering Heights coz Sandra Bullock mentioned it:) 2 Classic quotes: 1) A classic is a book praised but never read. 2) A classic exhausts the possibilities of its medium or genre. In that sense, i..."

That also got me reading Wuthering Heights earlier this year! When Sandra Bullock mentioned it in the Proposal.. "I read Wuthering Heights every Christmas" Haha! But I found it an odd novel...


message 27: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Rain: "...based on books that I have seen categorized under Modern Classics, that these are classic books that were produced at the turn of the 20th century." Yes, and I read in a ThoughtCo. article that modern classics daw would have to be written after WWI and WWII where cataclysmic events shifted the way the world is seen irrevocably.

Monique: Ay yes, I love Little Women din! :D "Modern classics are fairly "young" but may already be considered as timeless." Yes, I think this is pretty much what it is.

Lik: Hello!!! I hope you can join us in the F2F this coming Saturday! :) To answer your question if there are classics by Asian authors, there's a lot but I noticed that they're mostly Chinese and Japanese but they're super loooong maybe that's why they don't get assigned for school readings. :D Also, hmm I'm not sure we can call Twilight a modern classic. Heee. Upon research, modern classics daw are young, yet with a sense of longevity and can be considered to be a representation of the period in which it was written, so I'm not really sure if we want Twilight to be a representative of our period. (No offense meant to Twilight fans!) Some examples daw are On The Road, Catch-22, The Catcher in the Rye, The Book Thief.


message 28: by Mawi (new)

Mawi | 145 comments Hello, everyone! Event page is up! Please RSVP so I can confirm with the venue. Thank you and hope to see you there! :D


message 29: by Ravenchild (new)

Ravenchild Gardens | 14 comments Maybe 'modern classic' is just a term invented by booksellers to sell those books more;) My most reread and favorite classic book is also voted as the best--violent reactions to this authors' poll welcome:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/200...


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