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Pick-a-Shelf: Monthly -Archive > 2018-07 - Lierature Discussion Questions

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Lyn (Readinghearts) (lsmeadows) | 2848 comments Mod
This month's topic is literature, which the dictionary defines as "written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit." or "books and writings published on a particular subject.".

1. Of the two definitions above, which one most closely represents your interpretation of literature?

2. As you peruse this month's Literature Shelf, what do you think of the books on the list. Do you feel that they are a good representation of literature?

3. What book or books have you read that you feel most deserve to be called "literature" and why?

As always, have fun with the discussion and happy reading!


message 2: by Karin (new)

Karin The Moving Toyshop by Edmund Crispin 4 stars

If you enjoy funny mysteries, this book is for you, and even more so if you like them set in twentieth century England. This is my first time reading a book by Edmund Crispin (pen name of RR Montgomery) and I doubt it will be my last.


Poet Richard Cadogen has found the apparently strangled body of a woman in a toyshop late one night when he saw a shop door left open. He is bopped on the head and wakes up in a closet with an open window, but when he brings the police there the toy shop is gone and a grocery store in its place, plus no sign of a body anywhere. When he finishes his journey to his alma mater, Oxford, and pours out his take, his friend Professor Gervase Fen (apparently this series stars him, but I had no idea when I started it) helps him take up the search. Not only is it funny, but there are plenty of books mentioned for metafiction fans. No, not five stars for me (it is a mystery, for one thing), but I have no doubt it is for others.


message 3: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) | 1450 comments Karin, I think you should post your review here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...
:)


message 4: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) | 1450 comments 1. I guess the first definition is more akin to that of "literary fiction". I think both definitions work. Back when I was at uni we studied "literature" - I guess they meant the first definition.

2. Most (not all) of the books on the shelf seem to be classics. I wonder if people think literature = classics. Which may be true at times, but I think many contemporary works are literature, too.

3. I don't know that there is a single book that most deserves to be called "literature". There are too many of them.


message 5: by Joyce (new)

Joyce (eternity21) | 621 comments 1. Of the two definitions above, which one most closely represents your interpretation of literature? The first one: written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit."

2. As you peruse this month's Literature Shelf, what do you think of the books on the list. Do you feel that they are a good representation of literature? Most of the books seem to be classics to me some I've enjoyed others I haven't. There are a few newer books on this list that I feel will be classics to our grandchildren.

3. What book or books have you read that you feel most deserve to be called "literature" and why? Jane Eyre is one I feel fits the title. It is a timeless book that is to this day still enjoyed when a reader reads it for the first time.


message 6: by Paige (new)

Paige (iampaigeb) | 81 comments 1. I consider both definitions to be literature as I read both types. The topic does not have to be so blunt in the face. The whole story can be told with it simmering always in the background. I consider literature to be anything that is narrative, like Odd Thomas, to anything like a main subject, like a biography of a person. Literature can mean so many things to so many people. Not just a genre.

2. All the books are great and some I never even heard of. But as the app only shows a select few, not many peaked my interest. Doesn't mean that I have come across other books that I have that is also literature. I do want to read The Great Gatsby though.

3. Some books I consider to literature are ones that are very narrative. I will list some that I think everyone should read.
•Scrappy Little Nobody
•Odd Thomas (the whole series)
•Letters To The Lost
•Under The Dome
•Alexander Hamilton
•Any Sherlock story
•Shakespeare


message 7: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Zaccaria | 100 comments 1. I think both definitions work but in the sense of this book club, the first one.

2. I see a lot of classics and famous works.

3. I'm not sure to be honest. I'm still figuring out how to define things as "literature."


message 8: by Sassafrass (last edited Jul 29, 2018 02:26PM) (new)

Sassafrass (sass-a-frass) | 603 comments This month's topic is literature, which the dictionary defines as "written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit." or "books and writings published on a particular subject.".

1. Of the two definitions above, which one most closely represents your interpretation of literature?

I usually think of the first definition when I think about "literature"

2. As you peruse this month's Literature Shelf, what do you think of the books on the list. Do you feel that they are a good representation of literature?

I agree with most of the books on the literature shelf. There are some that I would cock an eyebrow at (if I knew how to that)


3. What book or books have you read that you feel most deserve to be called "literature" and why?

I tend to me more broad in my definition of literature. But for the most part, I think that books that really and truly make me think or self-reflect are those that I most consider literature. Also, those that are non-fiction but go beyond just entertainment value.


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