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ARCHIVE 2018 > September Group Read Nominations

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message 1: by Winter, Group Reads (last edited Aug 02, 2018 02:19AM) (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Hi everyone!

It's time to nominate for September and the theme is Science!

Please remember to state a connection to the theme when you nominate. Thank you :)

Here are some short rules for nominating books:

~ Each person can nominate 1 book.

~ Book must be available both as a physical copy and as an ebook.

~ Authors: Please do not nominate your own book.

~ Please include the name of the book and the author or link to the book.

~ Please do not nominate books that are part of a series, unless it is the first book.

~ You can second someone else's nomination, but that will count as your nomination.

~ When nominating, please state a connection to the theme.

~ You cannot nominate a book which has previously been a group read. Past buddy reads are fine. (See Group Reads in the bookshelf)



This thread will be closed by July 25th, and we will choose ten books for the poll. If there are more than ten books nominated, we will choose the ten most nominated. If there is still a tie to get into the top ten, we'll go back to the Goodreads average rating to see which is highest.


message 2: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly Wendt | 117 comments I'll nominate Middlemarch by George Eliot.

How the book connects to the theme:
"Taking place in the years leading up to the First Reform Bill of 1832, Middlemarch explores nearly every subject of concern to modern life: art, religion, science, politics, self, society, human relationships."


message 3: by Lynn (last edited Jul 02, 2018 02:01PM) (new)

Lynn | 297 comments The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells

Synopsis: This masterpiece of science fiction is the fascinating story of Griffin, a scientist who creates a serum to render himself invisible, and his descent into madness that follows.


message 4: by Megan, Challenges (new)

Megan (lahairoi) | 6985 comments I'll nominate Seveneves by Neal Stephenson. Science fiction, world ticking down, struggling to save everything - sounds like science to the rescue to me!


message 5: by Vicky (new)

Vicky | 69 comments I nominate State of Wonder by Ann Patchett. A doctor travels through the jungle to find a missing Scientist.


message 6: by Ziggy (new)

Ziggy | 1080 comments I nominate We Are All Stardust: Leading Scientists Talk About Their Work, Their Lives, and the Mysteries of Our Existence. I have not read it yet, it’s nonfiction. The author has conversation with 19 scientists.


message 7: by Ilona, Global Moderator (last edited Jul 03, 2018 09:42AM) (new)

Ilona | 4238 comments I'd like to nominate A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.

According to the Goodreads blurb: "it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining."


message 8: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Thanks everyone, plenty of good choices already!


message 9: by Jenn (new)

Jenn I nominate The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, a Pulitzer prize-winning nonfiction book. The other nonfiction nominations so far sound really good too!


message 10: by Kat (new)

Kat Ilona wrote: "I'd like to nominate A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson."

I second the nomination of A Short History of Nearly Everything. I highly recommend it and have been planning to reread it.


message 11: by Katie (new)

Katie | 43 comments I'd like to nominate Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt

A short synopsis: Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? What kind of impact did Roe v. Wade have on violent crime? Freakonomics will literally redefine the way we view the modern world.


message 12: by Jen from Quebec :0) (last edited Jul 08, 2018 11:48AM) (new)

Jen from Quebec :0) (muppetbaby99) | 24 comments I'm not one for 'HARD SCIENCE' usually, but the 'soft', 'human sciences', like sociology + anthropology + economics....speaking of THOSE types of sciences...

I nominate Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City Evicted Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond by Matthew Desmond. Thank you. --Jen from Quebec :0)

SYNOPSIS: "Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America’s vast inequality—and to people’s determination and intelligence in the face of hardship."


message 13: by Eryn (new)

Eryn | 9 comments I nominate Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body by Neil Shubin. It's about how we evolved from fish, and how we can still see the remnants in our physiology.


message 14: by SarahKat, Buddy Reads (new)

SarahKat | 3470 comments I nominate This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession by Daniel J. Levitin

Science of how our brains perceive music. I have not read it, but it's on my list for this year, it sounds good, and it fits this prompt.


message 15: by Ilona, Global Moderator (new)

Ilona | 4238 comments I am so happy to see many non-fiction nominations this month! Thank you all!


message 16: by Mel (new)

Mel Siat | 1 comments Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

I'd like to nominate "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry", by Neil deGrasse Tyson because he has the ability to take a complicated subject such as astrophysics and simplify it in a way that's comprehensive by everyone.


message 17: by Claire (new)

Claire  (claire6452) | 713 comments I'd like to nominate An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield .


In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement-and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff.


RJ - Slayer of Trolls (hawk5391yahoocom) | 1100 comments Kat wrote: "Ilona wrote: "I'd like to nominate A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson."

I second the nomination of A Short History of Nearly Everything. I highly re..."


I will second this one also


message 19: by Amanda (new)

Amanda (dangerprowse) I'd like to nominate A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawkins


message 20: by Angela (new)

Angela Holt (angelaaholt) | 36 comments Randy wrote: "Kat wrote: "Ilona wrote: "I'd like to nominate A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson."

I second the nomination of A Short History of Nearly Everything...."


I fourth this! It's SO GOOD and I'd LOVE to read it again!


Travelling Bookworm (travellingbookworm) | 10 comments Mel wrote: "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

I'd like to nominate "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry", by Neil deGrasse Tyson because he has the ability to take a complicated subject such ..."


I'll second this one. I have been curious about this book for a while, I feel like it will be a fun and interesting one.


message 22: by Melanie (last edited Jul 17, 2018 03:42PM) (new)

Melanie | 40 comments Kimberly wrote: "I'll nominate Middlemarch by George Eliot.

How the book connects to the theme:
"Taking place in the years leading up to the First Reform Bill of 1832, Middlemarch explore..."


I'll second Middlemarch this has been on my to read list for awhile.


message 23: by Darlene (new)

Darlene (gryffreads) | 27 comments I'll nominate Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World by Bill Nye

In Unstoppable, Bill Nye crystallizes and expands the message for which he is best known and beloved. That message is that with a combination of optimism and scientific curiosity, all obstacles become opportunities, and the possibilities of our world become limitless.


message 24: by Joe (last edited Jul 15, 2018 09:35PM) (new)

Joe | 110 comments Lab Girl has good buzz. A memoir written by award winning scientist Hope Jahren.


message 25: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 344 comments Mel wrote: "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

I'd like to nominate "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry", by Neil deGrasse Tyson because he has the ability to take a complicated subject such ..."


I second Astrophysics for People in a Hurry


message 27: by Jess (new)

Jess Penhallow | 72 comments Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Largely set in a futuristic World State of genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipates huge scientific developments in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological manipulation, and classical conditioning that are combined to make a utopian society that goes challenged only by a single outsider.


message 28: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 40 comments Jess wrote: "Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Largely set in a futuristic World State of genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipate..."


I am pretty sure this was already a group read.


Octothorpe Reader Leora K (octothorpereaderleorak) | 276 comments The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

And so the Department of Diachronic Operations—D.O.D.O. —gets cracking on its real mission: to develop a device that can bring magic back, and send Diachronic Operatives back in time to keep it alive . . . and meddle with a little history at the same time. But while Tristan and his expanding operation master the science and build the technology, they overlook the mercurial—and treacherous—nature of the human heart

Genre:
Science
Science Fiction
Historial Science Fiction


message 30: by Robin (new)

Robin A how about The Third Bank of the River Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold


message 31: by Ann (new)

Ann  Gibson (goodreadscomgreenmacgal) | 11 comments I second ( or maybe it’s 5th now) the nomination of A Brief History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.


message 32: by Ann (new)

Ann  Gibson (goodreadscomgreenmacgal) | 11 comments Correction on last post. A Short (not Brief) History of Nearly Everything.


message 33: by SonRod8a (last edited Jul 21, 2018 07:59PM) (new)

SonRod8a | 19 comments For your consideration, I nominate The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot.

Born in the 1920s, Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer in 1951. Without her or her family’s knowledge, the tumor cells were harvested for research due to their prolific and durable nature. Dubbed HeLa cells, these cells revolutionized medical research and are used as the basis for testing vaccines (to include J. Salk’s Polio Vaccine) and human sensitivity to various products. The book is written in collaboration with her family and has sparked legal and ethical debates over the rights of an individual to his or her genetic material and tissue.


message 34: by Brittany (new)

Brittany Morrison | 408 comments I'd like to nominate Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou

Its about a fraud start up company that was supposed to revolutionize the medical field by making blood testing easier and faster. Heard about it on the My Favorite Murder podcast and I'm hoping to read it soon and it so happens to fit September's theme.


message 35: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Jess wrote: "Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Largely set in a futuristic World State of genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipate..."


We have already read this one unfortunately. Do you want to nominate another ? :)


message 36: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Robin wrote: "how about The Third Bank of the River Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold"

Hi Robin :) This one looks good. When nominating we always state a connection to the theme of the month. This month the theme we have is Science. The connection doesn't have to be very obcious. Any connection would work. Would you please state a connection for your nomination? :)


message 37: by Robin (new)

Robin A Winter wrote: "Robin wrote: "how about The Third Bank of the River Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold"

Hi Robin :) This one looks good. When nominating we always state a ..."

sorry I missed that part. Reading through again I guess I don't see any link to why it is science based. I had just clicked on science shelf link and it was listed and sounded interesting.


message 38: by Robin (new)

Robin A Robin wrote: "Winter wrote: "Robin wrote: "how about The Third Bank of the River Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold"

Hi Robin :) This one looks good. When nominating we ..."


sorry I missed that part. Reading through again I guess I don't see any link to why it is science based. I had just clicked on science shelf link and it was listed and sounded interesting


message 39: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Robin wrote: "Winter wrote: "Robin wrote: "how about The Third Bank of the River Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon by Chris Feliciano Arnold"

Hi Robin :) This one looks good. When nominating we ..."


We will count that as the link ;)


message 40: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Last two days of nominating!


message 41: by TCampbell (new)

TCampbell | 320 comments The Chemist I'd like to nominate The Chemist by Stephanie Meyer. It's a departure from her supernatural genre, unless you consider that the heroine's superpower in this novel is science. Page-turner


message 42: by Steven (last edited Jul 25, 2018 05:00PM) (new)

Steven (steve360) | 3 comments I nominate The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu it is very dense in science and it actually has a couple of what if scenarios and pretty interesting ideas. Not sure if it was a group read already...didn't check


message 43: by Winter, Group Reads (new)

Winter (winter9) | 4726 comments Closing nominations, keep an eye out for the poll!


message 44: by Winter, Group Reads (new)


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