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good 'reentrant' audiobooks?

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message 1: by Tamahome (new)

Tamahome | 6252 comments What are some good audiobooks where, if your mind drifts for a minute, you don't get completely lost and think "I'd better read this instead"?


message 2: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4142 comments In the SFF genre? Ready Player One is pretty easy to drift away or multi-task to.

Generally, I find the light mystery-thriller type books are easy for drifting, at least easier than most SFF books. Books like the Andy Carpenter books or the recent Magical Cats mysteries I read...


message 3: by Tamahome (last edited Aug 03, 2014 10:21AM) (new)

Tamahome | 6252 comments Not Angelmaker, although many like its intricacies. 'Cozy mysteries' Kristin?


message 4: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4142 comments Heh I'd never heard that term, but based on Google results, yeah I'd say that some of the books I've read fit that bill AND they are the type to be easy to be distracted from... :)


message 5: by Michele (new)

Michele | 1154 comments Do you re-read? I've been listening to some old books that I'd previously read with my eyes. I'm enjoying both revisiting old friends and getting a new perspective from listening. Plus if I miss a bit (damn gardeners with their damn leafblowers) it doesn't matter too much.


message 6: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments Tamahome wrote: "Not Angelmaker, although many like its intricacies. 'Cozy mysteries' Kristin?"

I had to start so many chapters of that book over. It was so hard to keep track of what was going on. I wonder if it would have been easier in print. Sometimes, the audiobook productions don't pause enough where there are page breaks and scene changes in the books. That makes them really tough to follow.


message 7: by David Sven (new)

David Sven (gorro) | 1582 comments Tamahome wrote: "What are some good audiobooks where, if your mind drifts for a minute, you don't get completely lost and think "I'd better read this instead"?"

I like Name of the Wind as narrated by Rupert Degas -
Anything Abercrombie as read by Steven Pacey-
Blood Song works well in audio and is probably my favourite book this year.

Anything by Aastair Reynolds that is narrated by John Lee is good.
The Dresden books are good in audio.


message 8: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 4142 comments Sandi wrote: "I had to start so many chapters of that book over. It was so hard to keep track of what was going on. I wonder if it would have been easier in print. Sometimes, the audiobook productions don't pause enough where there are page breaks and scene changes in the books. That makes them really tough to follow."

Haven't tried that one, but this is absolutely true. The editing/narration of some books makes is really hard to figure out where authors have put a section break or where one scene ends and another begins. That drives me nuts and almost always causes me to rewind and re-listen.


message 9: by Rob, Roberator (new)

Rob (robzak) | 6782 comments Mod
Dresden Files. Most Urban Fantasy really. The Magic 2.0 series. But I'd agree with Michelle that rereads work well for that.


message 10: by Mykander (new)

Mykander | 19 comments Basically anything that isn't hard scifi, a lot of character view points, or heavily political focused. Really you have to work hard to find a book that needs a lot of attention in audio form. Outside of hard scifi the only books I've found difficult to listen to, as I listen to audiobooks solely so I can multitask, are the Wheel of Time and Song of Ice and Fire series. Someone mentioned Abercrombie, although I don't think the First Law Trilogy would work well for that style, although the one offs would.


message 11: by Dharmakirti (last edited Aug 04, 2014 07:26PM) (new)

Dharmakirti | 942 comments I'm going to go out of genre and recommend Steve Martin reading his own book, The Pleasure of My Company. It's charming and funny and if you get distracted for a moment, you won't feel lost.

For something in genre, I would suggest checking out Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys read by the excellent Lenny Henry. I think he does such a good job bringing the characters and story alive, it is one of the few instances where I liked the audiobook better than the print version.

Another instance where I liked the audiobook better than the print version was the middle-later books (7-10) of the Wheel Of Time series. But that is kinda a back handed compliment because those novels, IMHO, destroyed the pace of the series. The audiobooks made for good background when I worked in data entry. They entertained me and the readers did a good job.


message 12: by Clyde (new)

Clyde (wishamc) | 415 comments Michele wrote: "Do you re-read? I've been listening to some old books that I'd previously read with my eyes. I'm enjoying both revisiting old friends and getting a new perspective from listening. Plus if I miss a ..."

Oh yes indeed, Michele. Narration lets me enjoy old friends again from a new viewpoint. Most recently listening to the audio narration of The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle gave me a whole new appreciation of Sir. Nigel.


message 13: by Ben (new)

Ben (bennewton_1) | 253 comments I find a lot of comedy memoirs are good for this sort of thing, especially when the author narrates it. Some that jump to mind are Paddle Your Own Canoe, Bossypants, Nerd Do Well and the really excellent Born Standing Up.


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