Read Scotland 2014 discussion

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The Hebridean: 9-12 books > PJ's Assynt Expanded Outward

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message 2: by Peggy (new)

Peggy (peggyherself) | 237 comments Good list, P.J. Only one I've read is The Cabinetmaker. I have The Blackhouse to read on the shelf.


message 3: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien I just finished Death on a Longship, which I liked very much. In fact, I liked it so much that I may as well add the next ones in the series to my list:

10. Trowie Mound Murders
11. A Handful of Ash

and maybe even Taylor's non-fiction:
12.Women's Suffrage in Shetland


message 4: by Peggy (new)

Peggy (peggyherself) | 237 comments P.J. wrote: "I just finished Death on a Longship, which I liked very much. In fact, I liked it so much that I may as well add the next ones in the series to my list:

10. [book:Trowie Mound Murd..."


I just bought Trowie Mound Murder didn't realize it was part of Death on a Longship!


message 5: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien I'd actually done the same thing. Then I noticed somewhere that it was the second in the series, though I don't know how much one is dependent upon the other. You'd probably be ok starting with it.

I ended up getting all three anyway since I was in that vibe for some reason.


message 6: by C. (friends, please call me by name) (last edited Oct 19, 2014 07:04AM) (new)

C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) I searched a few threads to check on yours. Following a series is a must, if your mind retains information and you like being surprised properly. I might have already told you, I wait years to dig into books I own because I'm filling in those series. It's a huge satisfaction though.

At first I gaped that your list is long. Then I considered mine looks likewise. We're plotting what we have on hand that we might read. The finished ones will be noted. Like you, I say it's broadening to sample a nice variety. One wouldn't want only coleslaw on their plate. Heeheehee.


message 7: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien C. wrote: "...Like you, I say it's broadening to sample a nice variety. One wouldn't want only coleslaw on their plate..."

No indeed. No matter how fond we were of coleslaw. And it's always fun to try new things along with the old favorites.


message 8: by C. (friends, please call me by name) (last edited Oct 19, 2014 09:45AM) (new)

C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) We can certainly attune selections to our moods too. In music, I could never stand someone who stuck to one type. That's like confining yourself to one emotion; music is the amplification to emotion. When people say mathematics are the universal language, I say heck no. I'm an accomplished linguist but scarcely manage mathematics. Everyone can understand which sentiment music conveys though. That's what I call something everyone can grasp.

Coleslaw; I don't care for the diner, or fast food standards. My fiancé makes it well and my Grandma did. :-) Cabbage is one component of our garden still sitting in it. It doesn't need to be covered to ward off frost. We pick it, as it's snowing!


message 9: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien How do you keep the caterpillar-critters from eating your cabbage to a stalk? If I had more room in the garden, I'd be a little inclined to plant it more often.


C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) A famous question! I'll double check with my fiancé about what we determined, in his reading of the garden books I buy him. This year was no problem, if things had time to grow in a late spring, then wet early summmer. Our green and purple cabbage still stand unharmed.

I swear to you, planting Marigolds or a tomato plant in the same hanging basket or flowerbox as my Alyssium or Nasturtium, was magic. The insects that usually ate them were absent. I'm smiling, remembering Grandma's coleslaw. I guess you'd like to eat your own produce too next year. Something about 'companion planting' works.


message 11: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien C. wrote: "...I swear to you, planting Marigolds or a tomato plant in the same hanging basket or flowerbox as my Alyssium or Nasturtium, was magic. The insects that usually ate them were absent. I'm smiling, remembering Grandma's coleslaw. I guess you'd like to eat your own produce too next year. Something about 'companion planting' works. "

Companion planting works occasionally for pest control here in the mid-Atlantic, but when I lived further south, chomping insects must have laughed themselves silly through marigolds (even the old heritage style ones with real scents), nasturtiums, and everything else the organic gardening books and mags told me about. I still did organic anyway, but just learned to allow for the critters to have their share.


message 12: by C. (friends, please call me by name) (last edited Oct 20, 2014 04:57PM) (new)

C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) A tomato plant or Marigold helped; the alyssum and nasturtiums were the targets. I don't doubt things could be different in the south. Those hot weather insects are a might of their own! Lovely to talk gardening with you, P.J. :)

Yes, it render mute planting our food if we put chemicals around like stores and factories. There is a daisy-based spray that staved them off briefly, including cabbage I think. I'll ask Ron when he's in.


message 13: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien Realizing that I have only a few weeks to go in a very busy time, I decided not to wait to get copies of the remaining books on the list. Rather, I'll start a book that I've had for a few months, E.J. Lamprey's One Two Buckle My Shoe. I had not included it before because I already had enough mysteries on the list and was going for genre diversity. But I remembered that it's set in Scotland so that should count for the 12th book to meet the challenge. I'll just save the others for another time.


message 14: by C. (friends, please call me by name) (last edited Dec 11, 2014 04:52AM) (new)

C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) Unless I need to prioritize other themes, I think I can fulfill the two more I need to reach 12. By then, it's only one more to fulfill an entire 13: the original maximum of this group, at least as I wrote it down. Q;-)= I like that my own 3 groups run February to February but those are done. So here I am yet another December, wondering why 40+ challenges culminate at once. Good luck!


message 15: by P.J. (new)

P.J. O'Brien I've been reading Evelyn Glennie's Good Vibrations: My Autobiography here and there too. But it's not in the best of shape, so I tend to put it down whenever pages start to come loose. Unfortunately, that tends to happen early and often.


C.  (friends, please call me by name) (riedel) Glue inside the spine. I repair books all of the time, just with paper glue. It's good to leave it with weight on it a day or to, if you know you aren't reading it at those times. I use a toothpick to carefully spread the glue without wetting pages. On another subject, toothpicks also work to free flies from flypaper with their limbs intact.


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