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Poetry > Nude Self Portrait

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message 1: by Ruth (last edited Jun 30, 2018 03:25PM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments I'm delighted to be in The Ekphrastic Review again, with my poem inspired by Alice Neel's nude self portrait. I'm getting my money's worth out of this poem, this is its third publication. And one of the advantages of online publications is they can use images. I love having the actual painting up with the poem.

http://www.ekphrastic.net/the-ekphras...


message 2: by Heather (new)

Heather | 8544 comments Congratulations, Ruth!

I love your poem! I don’t know anything about poetry, how to write it or how it’s supposed to flow. I do know that when reading poems that rhyme or store-bought Hallmark cards with that sing-song quality, I lose interest quickly and don’t arrive to the point of trying to understand what is being written. They just annoy me.

But your words are so eloquent, they paint a scene in my head where I can almost see you talking to Alice. I kept scrolling up to the painting and I love the significances you assign to the brush and rag in her hands, the jowls, abdomen, etc. I wouldn’t get all of that out of just looking at the painting alone. Nor would my imagination be so poignantly accurate.

It seems your poem fits exactly right with her artistic intentions.

I feel honored that you are in this group!


message 3: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Wow, Heather, thanks so much. I'm honored to be here.


message 4: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Ruth wrote: "I'm delighted to be in The Ekphrastic Review again, with my poem inspired by Alice Neel's nude self portrait. I'm getting my money's worth out of this poem, this is its third publication. And one o..."

I don`t particularly care for much which poses for poetry these days, but yours was particularly refreshing and good. How did you handle the multiple printings? I never submit something that has been published before because I don`t want to get into all the hassles but you managed without much trouble?


message 5: by Ruth (last edited Jun 30, 2018 06:09PM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Thanks, Geoffrey. There are a few journals that will take previously published work. I like that. If they do, it will say so in the submission guidelines.


message 6: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 116 comments Ruth, that's a wonderful poem and your inspiration is a favorite work by a favorite artist. Thanks for introducing me to The Ekphrasitic Review as well.

Ekphrasis is something I use actively in one of my art history classes. Each summer I taught an art history workshop in our precollege program. One thing we did was go to the Walters Art Museum and look around. Then each student chose a work and produced a piece of ekphrastic writing. Often poems, not only. (We also spent the morning learning about ekphrasis before the trip.) At the end of the program the writings were collected, along with the images, into a little booklets. Some of those things were truly amazing--and from the pens of 17 year olds!

I don't know if you know, but the Blanton Museum of Art at UT-Austin includes ekphrasitic poetry with some of its descriptive labels. The poems were collected a few years ago, but it is marvelous to see a painting, read a conventional label and then a poem inspired by the work.

Sorry to run on. But thanks for what you have shared here!


message 7: by Ruth (last edited Jul 03, 2018 10:24PM) (new)

Ruth | 1957 comments Ellen, I enjoyed your note. I used to teach Art History, too, although my MFA is in studio art. I didn't know much about ekphrastic poetry until later, but I did use to read the occasional poem when I was lecturing, one that was pertinent to the paintings I was talking about. Auden's Musee des Beaux Arts was a favorite.

The college where I taught had a small art gallery with regular shows. Several of the English teachers used to bring their students over to write about the art.

Love the Blanton Museum's idea.


message 8: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Is that the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore?


message 9: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 116 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Is that the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore?"
Yes, indeed, a wonderful place. Do you know it? I teach at Maryland Institute College of Art which is nearby.


message 10: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments No, but my mom was friends with Mrs. Walters. When Mom got married in B, Mrs. Walters put me up for the night in her home. I slept in the basement under a Vouillard.

I visited MICA years ago and was extremely impressed with the faculty show. The only comparable teaching staffs were at San Diego State and Art I of Chicago in my estimation. You´ve got my extreme appreciation.


message 11: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 116 comments No kidding! That's a memory to cherish! Thanks for the compliment to MICA. It has long been an excellent school and I enjoy my colleagues and students very much.


message 12: by Mark (new)

Mark André I can also vouch for the Walters Art Museum. Such an interesting comparison can be made between the collection there and the one over at the BMA. - )


message 13: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 116 comments So right, Mark! They are entirely different places with different characters. I depend on them both!


message 14: by Mark (new)

Mark André I took an advanced Art Appreciation course when I was studying at TU. We had to visit, on our own, both museums. The main difference for me is how the two collections were formed. With the Walters we have an expression of one person's taste: the collector, well, and his son, maybe. While at the BMA, I assume decisions are always made by committees. - )


message 15: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 116 comments That was an excellent assignment. And I think I agree with you about "committees"--although sometimes those committees were very small. But it is true that acquisitions now have to go through a committee process. The work has to be demonstrably important, central to the mission of the institution and meaningful in other ways. The Walters now has the committee thing to contend with--but the lasting influence of the Walters and their taste can still be sensed.


message 16: by Mark (new)

Mark André Ellen wrote: "That was an excellent assignment. And I think I agree with you about "committees"--although sometimes those committees were very small. But it is true that acquisitions now have to go through a com..."
Well put. - )


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