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Books > The Book Salon ~~ July

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message 1: by Alias Reader (last edited Aug 01, 2018 08:26PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments


This the thread for general book discussions for July.

Tell us what you just read, are currently reading or plan to read. Tell us about your favorite author. Have you read some book news? Share it with the group. Anything related to books and reading, we want to hear all about it !
:)


message 3: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments LOL--great one! I keep hoping someone is working on #3. I would love to be able to sleep on a book & learn i had read it while asleep. Wouldn't that cut down on my TBR?!


message 4: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments Various library recommendations.




--- Spinning Silver
by Naomi Novik

"A wonderful reimagining of the Rumpelstiltskin story. A tale of love, family, magic, and destiny, told from the perspective of three strong female characters."

-- Melanie Liechty, Logan Library, Logan, UT



--- Clock Dance: A Novel
by Anne Tyler

"Willa Drake gets a second act when she steps in to care for a nine-year-old in a complicated situation. Character-driven fiction and a sweeping storyline."

-- Mary Anne Quinn, Warwick Public Library, Warwick, RI



---- Dear Mrs. Bird: A Novel
by A.J. Pearce

"In 1940s London, Emmy takes a job as a typist that evolves into answering rejected letters sent to an advice columnist."

-- Judy Hartman, Mechanicsville Public Library, Mechanicsville, IA



---- Baby Teeth: A Novel
by Zoje Stage

"A fragile woman struggles against her mute daughter’s schemes for her father’s undivided attention. Dark, creepy, and downright scary."

-- Kathryn Neal, Skiatook Library, Skiatook, OK



---- Give Me Your Hand
by Megan Abbott

"Kit competes for her dream job with a rival who was once her closest friend. Gripping psychological suspense."

-- Kristy Gates, Craighead County Jonesboro Public Library, Jonesboro, AR



---- Believe Me: A Novel
by J.P. Delaney

"An unemployed actress works for a divorce lawyer entrapping unsuspecting husbands until she finds herself ensnared in a murder investigation. This roller-coaster ride of a book will keep you guessing with an unreliable narrator and a twisty plot."

-- Linda Quinn, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT



---- Caught in Time: A Novel
by Julie McElwain

"The third book in the Kendra Donovan series finds our protagonist investigating the murder of a mill owner against the the backdrop of the Industrial Revolution."

-- Melissa Barber, Lubbock Public Library, Lubbock, TX



---- Somebody's Daughter
by David Bell

“Michael Frazier is searching for the missing daughter he never knew he had. A multi-layered plot with so many compelling, complex characters, this book grabbed me from the first sentences.”

-- Evelyn Cunningham, Norwalk Public Library, Norwalk, CT



---- The Romanov Empress: A Novel of Tsarina Maria Feodorovna
by C.W. Gortner

"A look at Maria, Empress of Russia, and her trials before and after becoming the Russian Empress. Well written historical fiction."

-- Janette McMahon, Fremont County Library System, WY



---- Fruit of the Drunken Tree: A Novel
by Ingrid Rojas Contreras

"Set against the violence of 1990s Colombia, a young girl and a maid form an unlikely and dangerous relationship. Equal parts heartwrenching and beautiful."

-- Alejandra Rodriguez, Osceola County Library, FL


PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments Compelling true-crime. If it weren't so well-documented, it would be hard to believe.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann reads like a novel with an outrageous plot that will outrage YOU!
Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann 5★
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 6: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments PattyMacDotComma wrote: "Compelling true-crime. If it weren't so well-documented, it would be hard to believe.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by [author:David Grann|1..."


It was an excellent book. It was part of the NY Times/pbs book club selection.


message 7: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments PattyMacDotComma wrote: "Compelling true-crime. If it weren't so well-documented, it would be hard to believe.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by [author:David Grann|1..."


It's shocking that things like this happen.


message 8: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments You are so right about well researched! I think Grann is a superb researcher. His prose doesn't always live up to his material but the stories are so entrancing that it doesn't matter.

Alias, what a wide variety of novels suggested by the librarians. Of course the Anne Tyler calls to me but others tickle my imagination.


message 9: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments Less Than A Treason Less Than A Treason (Kate Shugak, #21) by Dana Stabenow by Dana Stabenow

In this addition to the series, Alaskan private investigator Kate Shugak heals from a gunshot wound and searches for a missing man. Good mystery in a great setting. 3 stars

My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 10: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments Barbara wrote: "PattyMacDotComma wrote: "Compelling true-crime. If it weren't so well-documented, it would be hard to believe.
Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI..."


Shocking indeed, Barbara!


message 11: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments A second look with the benefit of hindsight. Talented Aussie author Aoife Clifford has written her second book Second Sight. Lots of seconds there, but it's a first-rate read!
Second Sight by Aoife Clifford 4.5★ Link to my review


message 12: by madrano (last edited Jul 03, 2018 10:50AM) (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Patty, the snippets you shared from the text are golden. Thanks for that, especially.

Barbara, i used to read the Kate Shugak series when it first began. I really liked that some people changed, so the characters were different. However, i stopped reading around the 10th installment because it became more depressing to read. I keep telling myself that someday i'll pick them up again.

Your comment about the potlach rings with me. They were my favorite parts of the book. I really liked her grandmother, too. And the descriptions of Alaska are wonderful. My aunt, who lived there over 25 years, says they were faithful to the landscape, too.

Have you tried her other series, the one about Liam Campbell? ( https://www.goodreads.com/series/4954... ) I read a number of them but they just didn't interest me the way Kate did. I see now, from the GR link, that she has three other series. Wow!


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments Thank you for your comments Madrano. I liked the grandmother also. One thing about Stabenow....she doesn't mind bumping off characters. So the cast does change. :):)

I haven't read the Liam Campbell series. I'm not drawn to it for some reason.


message 14: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments Library Staff Suggestions


--- The Poet X
by Elizabeth Acevedo

The daughter of devout immigrants discovers the power of slam poetry and begins participating in a school club as part of her effort to understand her mother's strict religious beliefs and her own developing relationship to the world.



--- The lost plot : an Invisible Library novel
by Genevieve Cogman

Agreeing to help a dragon who asks for her help tracking down a very rare book on behalf of the Library, a disgraced Irene takes a leave of absence to search for the book in Prohibition-era New York, only to find her efforts complicated by dragon internal politics, fae interference more.



---- The echo killing : A Mystery
by Christi Daugherty

When a murder that eerily resembles a 15-year-old cold case rocks Savannah, crime reporter Harper McClain risks everything to find the identity of a calculating killer.



---- Hardcore twenty-four : a Stephanie Plum novel
by Janet Evanovich

Reluctantly agreeing to babysit a professional grave robber's pet boa constrictor, Stephanie Plum is embroiled in a bizarre series of crimes that escalate from the violation of stolen corpses to the murder of a homeless man, a case that is complicated by the return of the hunky but reckless Diesel.



---- Naked in Baghdad : The Iraq War As Seen by Npr's Correspondent Anne Garrels
by Anne Garrels

The war correspondent for NPR describes the events in Baghdad, along with her experiences, during the Iraq War of 2003



---- The Home for Unwanted Girls
by Joanna Goodman

Forced to give up her baby in 1950s Quebec when she becomes pregnant with her childhood sweetheart, Maggie makes the wrenching decision to abandon a more secure life to search for her daughter, Elodie, who, after enduring torturous conditions in orphanages and psychiatric hospitals, struggles to survive in an unnerving alien world.



---- Smoke and mirrors
by Elly Griffiths

A sequel to Zig Zag Girl finds DI Edgar Stephens and magician Max Mephisto hunting for a killer during Brighton's holiday season after the gruesome murders of two children found at a crime scene eerily reminiscent of "Hansel and Gretel."


------The Outsider
by Stephen King

An unspeakable crime. A confounding investigation...An eleven-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City's most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. The case seems ironclad, especially when Anderson and the district attorney are able to add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. But Maitland has an alibi, and it turns out his story has incontrovertible evidence of its own. How can two opposing stories be true?



---- Blood water paint
by Joy McCullough

In Renaissance Italy, Artemisia Gentileschi endures the subjugation of women that allows her father to take credit for her extraordinary paintings, rape and the ensuing trial, and torture, buoyed by her deceased mother's stories of strong women of the Bible


------ Circe
by Madeline Miller

A highly anticipated follow-up to the award-winning The Song of Achilles follows the banished witch daughter of Titans as she hones her powers and interacts with famous mythological beings before a conflict with one of the most vengeful Olympians forces her to choose between the worlds of the gods and mortals.



---- Ramona Blue
by Julie Murphy

Struggling with the loss of her home and her dysfunctional family after Hurricane Katrina, gay teen Ramona finds solace in a new swimming hobby while developing confusing feelings for a boy who challenges her perceptions.



----- The chalk man : a novel
by C. J. Tudor

Three decades after his circle of friends is traumatized by the discovery of a murder victim while passing secret messages through a chalk-figure code of their invention, Eddie finds himself targeted by an unknown adversary who is using their former communication methods to torment and kill his friends.



----- The beast within : a tale of beauty's prince
by Serena Valentino

The author of Fairest of All presents an adaptation of the classic Beauty and the Beast fairy tale from the perspective of the cursed prince who is transformed from a beloved and jovial ruler into a reclusive and bitter monster in search of true love. 50,000 first printing.


message 15: by John (new)

John | 1335 comments I've started Educated: A Memoir as a group read, but not getting a lot of traction with her childhood in rural Idaho.


message 16: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments The Lost Plot sounded good until i was a few words into it--dragons? Hmmm. I wonder if author Genevieve Cogman knew about Jasper Fforde's The Well of Lost Plots, also a book chasing novel. They seem too similar to me. Anyway, the dragon part made the book less appealing.

John, i hope the book improves for you. Our discussion was often specific and we were rather critical of the issue of memories.


message 17: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments A Beautiful, Terrible Thing: A Memoir of Marriage and Betrayal A Beautiful, Terrible Thing A Memoir of Marriage and Betrayal by Jen Waite by Jen Waite

In this memoir Jen Waite - as aspiring actress - writes about meeting and marrying a man who was far from the great guy he pretended to be. Compelling tale of a failed marriage. 3 stars

My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 18: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments John wrote: "I've started Educated: A Memoir as a group read, but not getting a lot of traction with her childhood in rural Idaho."

I will be interested to hear your thoughts on the veracity of the book. I felt it was maybe misleading by omission.


message 19: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments John wrote: "I've started Educated: A Memoir as a group read, but not getting a lot of traction with her childhood in rural Idaho."

I really enjoyed that one, John. It can be hard if you've had a "mainstream" upbringing to realise how many kids have fallen through the cracks. I don't know which group you're reading it with, but I'll be interested in your opinion when you've finished.

My review doesn't have any spoilers, although I've summarised some bits. If you're interested, it's here. https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 20: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Barbara, not having been in such a relationship, it's probably hard to imagine such a toxic marriage. I'm sure i wouldn't have the stomach to read it but am relieved to know she and her daughter have overcome much to be healthier. Glad you shared.

Patty, i liked your review and think it was balanced. I hope John can find it useful, as well as our online group discussion posts.


message 21: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments Cute, inspiring children's book showing how young Fern finds a way to give Joy to her sad, stay-at-home Nanna. Recommended for all families!
Joy by Corrinne Averiss 5★ Link to my review


message 22: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments Mystery


----Shot in the Dark: A Coffeehouse Mystery
by Cleo Coyle

What it's about: A dating app, Cinder, has business at Manhattan's Village Blend percolating as users meet there -- until a bitter Cinder user threatens a former date in the coffeehouse and manager Clare Cosi finds another customer floating in a nearby river. Are the two incidents related? With trouble brewing, Clare searches for a killer.

Series alert: This is the 17th engaging Coffeehouse mystery; readers who want to watch recently engaged Clare's romantic relationship develop throughout the cozy series can start with the 1st book, On What Grounds. Recipes are included.



---- A Death of No Importance: A Mystery
by Mariah Fredericks

Introducing: intelligent, observant ladies' maid Jane Prescott, who takes a job working for the nouveau-riche Benchley family in 1910 Manhattan.

What happens: After pretty Charlotte Benchley's playboy fiancé is murdered, Jane partners with a journalist to solve the crime in a case that touches on class differences, a mining accident, anarchists, and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.

For fans of: Downton Abbey, Victoria Thompson's Gaslight mysteries, or Rhys Bowen's Molly Murphy mysteries.



--- Scot Free: A Last Ditch Mystery
by Catriona McPherson

Starring: Lexy Campbell, a Scottish marriage counselor who moved to California several months ago to marry the man of her dreams. But he's a cheat, they're divorcing, and she's going home.

What happens: The cops arrest one of Lexy's clients, a sweet elderly woman, for killing her husband; Lexy knows she's innocent, and forgoes flying back to Edinburgh to prove it.

Who it's for: Readers who like fish-out-of-water stories or humorous cozies with eccentric characters will enjoy this lighthearted series debut.



---- American by Day
by Derek B. Miller

What it is: the wry, intricately plotted follow-up (though it works as a standalone) to 2012's Dagger Award-winning Norwegian by Night.

What happens: Chief Inspector Sigrid Odegard leaves Oslo for upstate New York to search for her missing brother, who's suspected of killing his African American girlfriend. Sigrid connects with the witty, thoughtful Sheriff, and learns about the U.S. (and how it differs greatly from Norway) while exploring political and racial issues.

For fans of: fresh stories with strong characters and Scandinavian flair.



---- A Necessary Evil
by Abir Mukherjee

What it's about: In 1920 Calcutta, the crown prince of a small Indian kingdom is assassinated. It happens in front of Police Captain Sam Wyndham, a World War I veteran who'd worked for Scotland Yard, and Sergeant "Surrender-not" Banerjee, who'd been at Harrow with the prince. The two cops try to determine who ordered the killing, but religion, romance, and palace intrigue complicate their investigation.

Series alert: Like A Rising Man, the initial book in the series, this 2nd Sam Wyndham novel offers a strong sense of place, dry humor, a compelling plot, and well-realized characters.



---- Edgar Allan Poe and the Jewel of Peru: A Poe and Dupin Mystery
by Karen Lee Street

What happens: Edgar Allan Poe finds a disturbing package of dismembered crows on his doorstep, two men who'd traveled to Peru mysteriously die, ornithologist Helene Loddiges is kidnapped, and Poe and C. Auguste Dupin (whom Poe fans will know) investigate it all.

Why you should read it: Combining history and fiction, this entertaining 2nd in a trilogy (following Edgar Allan Poe and the London Monster) offers humor, a touch of the macabre, a writing style inspired by Poe, and a fascinating look at 1844 Philadelphia.


--***** Focus on: Soccer


---- Murder in Pigalle
by Cara Black

What it's about: It's a sweltering June in Paris, the city is hosting the 1998 World Cup, and unmarried five-months-pregnant PI Aimée Leduc must find a missing girl. Her neighbor, 13-year-old budding detective Zazie, had told Aimée she'd been investigating the serial rapist who'd been attacking schoolgirls...and then the girl disappeared.

Series alert: This is the 14th book in the atmospheric, character-driven Aimée Leduc series, and it'll please those who love international mysteries, Paris, and strong, clever female detectives.



----- Back to Bologna: An Aurelio Zen Mystery
by Michael Dibdin

What happens: World-weary Venetian police detective Aurelio Zen is sent to Bologna to investigate the murder of the unpopular owner of the local soccer team. The case quickly spirals out of control and entangles Zen with a semiotics student, his professor, a mysterious immigrant "princess," a celebrity chef, and an incompetent private detective.

Series alert: This 10th of 11 books in the delightfully dark yet humorous Aurelio Zen mysteries is "a tour-de-farce worthy of Groucho Marx" (Kirkus Reviews).



------ Tea Time for the Traditionally Built
by Alexander McCall Smith

Starring: intuitive, kind Precious Ramotswe, the founder and owner of Botswana's No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency.

What happens: Precious investigates the unexpected losing streak of a local soccer club and her beloved white van develops an odd rumble.

Who it's for: Fans of charming cozies with strong senses of place will like this 10th in a series that inspired the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency TV show starring Jill Scott.



----- Brutality: A Fina Ludlow Novel
by Ingrid Thoft

What it's about: Middle-aged soccer mom -- and former college soccer star -- Liz Barone is suing her alma mater for the cognitive damage she suffered as a player. When she's brutally attacked at home, leaving her in a coma, her mom hires PI Fina Ludlow, who wades through the financially lucrative and emotionally charged world of collegiate sports.

For fans of: Sue Grafton, Sara Paretsky, and Carol Higgins Clark.

Series alert: This 3rd Fina Ludlow mystery is a Shamus Award-winner for Best PI Novel.


message 23: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments I should have guessed that there are soccer mystery books. I had no idea but have informed my husband and my daughter's boyfriend, who subscribes to cable strictly for the sport. Thanks for that info.

How weird that the Coffeehouse mystery listed is the 17th in the series, as i've never heard of them. It seems like something which would call to me. I see Cleo Coyle includes recipes in her series...i wonder if they are for coffee or go-withs. Have to check this out.


message 24: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments madrano wrote: "I should have guessed that there are soccer mystery books. I had no idea but have informed my husband and my daughter's boyfriend, who subscribes to cable strictly for the sport. Thanks for that in..."

Glad to be of help.


message 25: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments Romance



---- The Prince
by Katharine Ashe

What it’s about: Twenty-year-old Libby Shaw is determined to enter Edinburgh’s all-male Royal College of Surgeons -- even if she has to disguise herself as a man. Exiled Mediterranean prince and famed portrait artist Ziyaeddin Mirza agrees to help Libby with her ruse, which draws them closer than either had anticipated.

What sets it apart: Featuring a prince with a disability, this Regency romance proves that heroes come in all forms.

Series alert: This is the 4th Devil’s Duke book after The Duke.



---- The Kiss Quotient
by Helen Hoang

What it’s about: Stella Lane, a highly successful mathematician who has Asperger’s, knows everything about numbers, but very little about the experience of love -- so she hires escort Michael Phan to school her in the mechanics of romance.

About the author: Helen Hoang has Asperger’s, allowing her to create a sensitive and realistic rendering of what it’s like for those on the autism spectrum to navigate romantic relationships.

Reviewers say: “A compulsively readable erotic romance that is equal parts sugar and spice” (Library Journal).



---- Too Wilde to Wed
by Eloisa James

Starring: Lord Roland “North” Northbridge Wilde, who has returned home after fighting in the American colonies, and his ex-fiancée, Miss Diana Belgrave, whom he is surprised to discover working as a governess in his family home -- and who has a two-year-old son, Godfrey, in tow.

Why you might like it: This Georgian-set historical romance is trademark Eloisa James: wry wit, sensuality, and well-developed characters.

Series alert: Too Wilde to Wed is the 2nd in the Wildes of Lindow Castle series after Wilde in Love.



---- Herons Landing
by JoAnn Ross

What it’s about: Two years after contractor Seth Harper lost his Army nurse wife Zoe to the war in Afghanistan, his life consists of work, work, and more work. But when Zoe’s best friend, burned-out Las Vegas concierge Brianna Mannion, returns to their seaport hometown, he finds a second chance at love diverting his attention.

Is it for you? Fans of cozy, small-town contemporary romances will enjoy this 1st entry in the Honeymoon Harbor series.

You might also like: Just Breathe by Susan Wiggs.


***** Military Men



---- The Escape
by Mary Balogh

What it’s about: Army officer Sir Benedict "Ben" Harper has spent six years learning to walk again after being wounded in the Napoleonic Wars. Ambulatory at last, he has no idea what he'll do with the rest of his life. Enter young widow Samantha McKay, who is now free to make her own decisions after being trapped for years in the household of her cruel in-laws.

Series alert: The Escape is the 3rd moving Regency romance in the Survivor's Club septet, after The Proposal and The Arrangement.



----- Target Engaged: A Delta Force Novel
by M.L. Buchman

What it’s about: The selection process for the elite Delta Force counter-terrorism unit is ultra-competitive, and Sergeant Carla Anderson, Delta's first (and, so far, only) female candidate is determined to make the cut -- but so is Green Beret Kyle Reeves, who may just be her perfect match.

Series alert: Steamy, suspenseful, and action-packed, Target Engaged kicks off the Delta Force series.

Further reading: If you enjoy M.L. Buchman's brand of compelling military romance, you might also try Cherry Adair’s Out of Sight.



----- The Protector
by Donna Grant

Featuring: Marine Force Recon Captain Cullen Loughman, who desperately needs help rescuing his kidnapped father, and former Air Force pilot Mia Carter, who is Cullen’s best bet in the fight to bring his father home -- if they can put their overwhelming mutual attraction aside.

Series alert: The Protector is the 2nd in the Sons of Texas trilogy, after The Hero.

Reviewers say: “A well-drawn couple with off-the-charts chemistry and a breath-stealing plot” (Publishers Weekly).



----- Once a Soldier
by Mary Jo Putney

What it’s about: With the Napoleonic Wars finally over, Major Lord Will Masterson is eager to return home to England, but duty instead calls him to the Iberian Peninsula, where he meets strong, independent, and unconventional Athena Markham.

Is it for you? Yes, if you like feisty heroines, well-developed characters, atmospheric settings, and historical background information all woven seamlessly together.

Series alert: This is the 1st Georgian historical romance in the Rogues Redeemed series; up next is Once a Rebel.



----- The Girl with the Make-Believe Husband: A Bridgertons Prequel
by Julia Quinn

What it’s about: When her brother Thomas is injured in battle, Cecilia Harcourt sets sail for the American colonies, but by the time she arrives, he has gone missing. Posing as the wife of her brother’s best friend -- who conveniently has amnesia -- will allow Cecilia to continue her search for Thomas...if her feelings for her fake husband don't get in the way.

Series alert: This is the 2nd in the Rokesby series and a prequel to author Julia Quinn’s Bridgertons series.



----- All for You: A Coming Home Novel
by Jessica Scott

What it’s about: On his 74th day of sobriety, Sergeant First Class Reza Iaconelli meets Fort Hood's newest resident, Captain Emily Lindberg -- and as their subsequent battle of wills transforms into mutual admiration, both tentatively consider the possibility of a relationship.

Series alert: All for You is the 4th installment of the Coming Home novels, after Back to You.

About the author: Jessica Scott, who served as an army officer in Iraq, draws on her own experiences to authentically depict military life.


message 26: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments Tea Time for the Traditionally Built has to be one of the funniest titles I’ve seen in a long time! I’ll bet it’s another nice one from Alexander McCall Smith. I’m still chuckling. :)


message 27: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments Just read The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan, who has somehow managed to squeeze a bunch of stories together. I have to add that it’s one of the prettiest covers I’ve seen!
The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan My review is here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 29: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Alias, i like the graphic for the Romance novels. It's clever and i can imagine a Valentine featuring that art.

Dem, this sounds like a good book with a fine resolution. I appreciate your comments.

Patty, i liked Keeper of Lost Things very much, particularly "the lovely cup of tea" phrase. As one who tends to keep things i find, i truly admired the idea expressed about them. It's amusing that you mentioned the McCall Smith book title with its reference to "tea" as well.


message 30: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments The Nature of the Beast The Nature of the Beast (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache #11) by Louise Penny by Louise Penny

In this 11th book in the 'Chief Inspector Armand Gamache' series, Gamache is retired and living in the Québec village of Three Pines. There he gets involved in a situation that has dire international implications.....and costs a child his life. The book provides enough background information to be read as a standalone. Okay mystery, but it's not among Penny's best books. 3 stars

My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 31: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments A very big thank you to all you take the time to share their reads with everyone. You're the best ! ♥


message 32: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Barbara, it's neat to read reviews here of series i read in the beginning. the Inspector Gamache series is one of those. I can get a sense of what has happened with some of the characters without reading the book. For now, that suffices for me.


message 33: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1101 comments Barbara, I agree that The Nature of The Beast wasn't one of Louise Penny's best efforts but it was interesting in itself. I love that series. It started slow but the characters really grew on me.


message 34: by Petra (new)

Petra | 1101 comments I love family sagas that continue over the generations. I like watching the characters grow through childhood, into adulthood and then having children of their own. It's wonderful to see the family survive over the years.
I just finished the third book of the Cazalet family saga: Confusion.


message 35: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments Flush Flush by Carl Hiaasen by Carl Hiaasen

Hiaasen usually writes comic novels for adults, but this one is aimed at middle-grade kids. It's about a pair of siblings who try to expose the crooked owner of a casino-boat …..who dumps the ship's toilet waste into the ocean. Funny book with an important environmental message. 3.5 stars

My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 36: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments Petra wrote: "Barbara, I agree that The Nature of The Beast wasn't one of Louise Penny's best efforts but it was interesting in itself. I love that series. It started slow but the characters really grew on me."

I agree Petra, the series has great characters. 🙂


message 37: by PattyMacDotComma (last edited Jul 09, 2018 05:24AM) (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments A change of pace here. loved this artistic picture book of a newspaper searching for its purpose in life in a beautifully illustrated olde-worlde society. I included some of the illustrations. Enjoy!
A Page in the Wind by José Sanabria.
A Page in the Wind by José Sanabria 5★ https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 38: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Barbara, i was glad to see your comments on Hiaasen's YA book, as i wondered if it would be a hit or miss. The environmental angle is a terrific idea for that age group, too.

Patty, the art of the book looks old-fashioned but i really like it. What a fun book. Like you, i think it would be fun to read with a child & catch their interest.

Two neat reviews of books for younger people. Thank you both.


message 39: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments It is with profound relief that i finally finished How the Other Half Lives by Jacob A. Riis about New York tenements in the late 1800s. Last month i mentioned (ranted?) about how distracting the racist comments were, so i took a break. The subsequent chapters, where he doesn't examine different ethnic neighborhoods showed his true caring, although he still had many negative things to say about Italian immigrants.

The photos in my ebook version were mostly suggestive of his efforts, so i followed up with an online search. These indicate how powerful his photojournalistic efforts were-- https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...


message 40: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 10, 2018 04:18PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments madrano wrote: "It is with profound relief that i finally finished How the Other Half Lives by Jacob A. Riis about New York tenements in the late 1800s. Last month i mentioned (ranted?..."

It's hard sometimes when reading to not judge the past through the lens of the present. Historical context is important. Though some views are abhorrent no matter the era. Do you think his ideas on minorities were widely accept in his time ?

I have only read online his views of minorities. It seems he may have resolved this in his own mind by believing in "scientific racism". (that certain races are superior) One would think since, as you noted, he did seem to care and his photography works and muckraking journalism seems to support that, than how could he not have know that his views were marred by racism?

Much food for thought.

I haven't read his book. Though I see it referred to a lot. Would you recommend it ?

I see on Amazon many complaining about the size and quality of the photographs. How were they in you edition? Some say the Kindle edition has corrected this. It selling for $3.


message 41: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments A bright red cover for an equally colourful history/mystery! I recommend Susan Orlean’s The Library Book to all book lovers.
The Library Book by Susan Orlean 5★ Link to my review


message 42: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments The Nowhere Man The Nowhere Man (Orphan X, #2) by Gregg Hurwitz by Gregg Hurwitz

In this second book in the 'Orphan X' series, super-assassin Evan Smoak finds himself imprisoned by a sociopath who wants his money. Lots of action but a thin plot. Still worth reading however. 3 stars

My review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 43: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Alias, i'm torn on suggesting someone read the Riis book. The stats are interesting but seemed to go on & on (plus an appendix of them), which i tended to skim past. Because it is a classic and because the photos are remarkable, i decided to stay with it but am not sure it was worth the time. Due to the poor reproductive quality of the ebook photos (i got this via Overdrive, so am presuming it is more than just scanned), i could have saved myself plenty of time by just Googling the photos. They are good history, imo.

Btw, I was unaware that Riis was an immigrant himself, from Denmark. How many of his racist observation were carried over from his European heritage and how many were from life in the States, i don't know. However, i do believe his views were similar to many of his status at the time in which he wrote. As you noted, it appears he advocated scientific racism, which would, imo, make his opinions more conscious than not. Again, it was short book and is now off my TBR, a book i've long puzzled over and heard was valuable.

PattyMac, the Orlean book sound perfect for a bibliophile like any of us here. I enjoyed an earlier book by her, The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession and still have Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend on my TBR. I appreciate the bits you've shared.

Barbara, this sounds as though it could be a good series, although the thin plot is bothersome. The idea of the agency and the character are neat, at least.


message 44: by John (last edited Jul 12, 2018 08:11AM) (new)

John | 1335 comments Halfway through Educated: A Memoir, end of Part One - she's off to college.

Skimmed through a fair amount of the never-ending dysfunction, which seemed like piling on in places. I'm left wondering what BYU thinks of the fact that she's admitting her application was not all that honest, if an outright lie? Alias raised a great point of why a bright kid needs to have a K-12 education, when they can just study for the entrance exam as a teenager instead?


message 45: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments madrano wrote: "Alias, i'm torn on suggesting someone read the Riis book. The stats are interesting but seemed to go on & on (plus an appendix of them), which i tended to skim past. Because it is a classic and bec..."

Thanks for the feedback, deb.


message 46: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments It is a good question, John. If you read the thread where several of us read the book together, you'll see that we were quite skeptical of her facts about the entrance exam. Not that she passed it, only that she undersold how much help she got and how much she studied.

Good question about BYU. I cannot help but wonder if they have a sense that she isn't alone in being dishonest about her education when applying there. The LDS promote homeschooling, so it may be they have allowances of which many of us are unaware.


message 47: by madrano (new)

madrano | 13271 comments Well, i bit the bullet and am reading Hope Never Dies, an Obama & Biden mystery series by Andrew Shaffer. I won't lie to you and say it's a great mystery but i kinda like the relaxed atmosphere the book displays in Biden's character. I'm 1/3 into it already, so reading it is fast.


message 48: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (cinnabarb) | 3039 comments madrano wrote: "Well, i bit the bullet and am reading Hope Never Dies, an Obama & Biden mystery series by Andrew Shaffer. I won't lie to you and say it's a great mystery but i kind..."

Well this sounds entertaining. 🙂


message 49: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 12, 2018 04:53PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 20393 comments madrano wrote: "Well, i bit the bullet and am reading Hope Never Dies, an Obama & Biden mystery series by Andrew Shaffer. I won't lie to you and say it's a great mystery but i kind..."

I am on the library waiting list for The President Is Missing by Bill Clinton The President Is Missing--Bill Clinton
It's written with James Patterson

I normally don't read this genre. The one book I read by Patterson and company, I didn't care for it. I know I am in the minority on Patterson's books.

Anyway, I thought I would give this one a shot since it is President Clinton. Though when I check out the President's recommeded reading lists we do not have the same tastes in books. For example, he is a huge fan of
One Hundred Years of Solitude Which felt like a million years of torture to me. I tried to read this multiple times but I finally gave up on it a few hundred pages in. Magical Realism is absolutely not my genre.

If the Patterson/Clinton book doesn't grab me right away, I won't force it. That's the great thing about the library. It doesn't cost me anything to explore outside of my comfort zone.


message 50: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1117 comments madrano wrote: "Alias, i'm torn on suggesting someone read the Riis book. The stats are interesting but seemed to go on & on (plus an appendix of them), which i tended to skim past. Because it is a classic and bec..."

I haven't read The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession, but I remember enjoying the screen version, called "Adaptation", with Nicholas Cage. And it all started with a New Yorker article by Susan Orlean. Interesting how one thing leads to another!


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