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Book Discussions > Mr Loverman: Book Discussion

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message 1: by Donald (new)

Donald | 126 comments Discussion thread for Mr Loverman


message 2: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 9 comments Gosh, I had no idea this book was being discussed. I loved it! So, I've never joined a discussion here before. Can you discuss any part of the book, just the beginning of the book for now, and are there spoiler alerts required?


message 3: by Donald (last edited Aug 02, 2014 02:55PM) (new)

Donald | 126 comments Columbus wrote: "Gosh, I had no idea this book was being discussed. I loved it! So, I've never joined a discussion here before. Can you discuss any part of the book, just the beginning of the book for now, and are ..."

Hey Columbus, we quite flexible about the discussion thread and happy to have you join here. Looking forward to readin the book more now after your comment. Perhaps you can take a lead on the discussion? I will start reading in the next day or two and will join


message 4: by ColumbusReads (last edited Aug 02, 2014 03:29PM) (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 9 comments Oh, great Donald. I enjoyed this book immensely. Bernardine Evaristo is an incredibly talented author and her witty writing is certainly on display here.

Barrington Jedidiah Walker (Mr. Loverman) is a hoot! Witty, audacious, loving and carefree. He's a 74 year old closeted gay man born in Antigua and living in London with his wife of 50 years. Oh, and did I mention his lover (whom his wife figures as just his BFF) lives nearby where they enjoy a tryst every now and then, unbeknownst to anyone. Will Barry finally tell his wife that he is no longer happy in this marriage and prefer to spend the rest of his life with his lover? I think the subtitle to this book could have been -- Mr. Loverman: Travails of A Marriage Gone Bad.

Excellent read!


message 5: by Beverly (new)

Beverly I will be able to start Mr. Loverman in a couple of days. This book has been on my tbr list for a little while.

I have books by Bernardine Evaristo before and love her characterizations, her storytelling style to always been an interesting twist to her work.


message 6: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 9 comments Beverly, have you started Mr. Loverman yet? Curious to know what you think...Anyone else started this incredibly good book?


message 7: by ConnorD (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments Columbus I agree - this is great book
Found myself feeling for two marriage gone bad, but mostly I laughed at the dialogue between the two men and the references to African culture

The rasta and homophobia connection? Did you relate to that?


message 8: by Beverly (last edited Aug 17, 2014 09:44AM) (new)

Beverly Columbus wrote: "Beverly, have you started Mr. Loverman yet? Curious to know what you think...Anyone else started this incredibly good book?"

Columbus -

Work projects have me sooo behind in my reading but this book is definitely on ereader for a very long plane ride in two weeks.


message 9: by Mocha Girl (new)

Mocha Girl (mochagirl) | 8 comments I received my copy from the library yesterday.


message 10: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 9 comments Sorry I'm just responding to this. I've finally got my busy things out the way and can now respond quicker.

Priscilla/Beverly: curious to get your opinion on this book.

Connor: I loved the witty banter between Barry and Morris as well. Some of it was so hilarious I just about dropped the book at times; no kidding. I won't go deep into the story because I know readers are still reading, but there appears to be quite a few reviewers who were unhappy with the verbal fighting between husband and wife. It was borderline for me, at times I thought it was a little much - never overkill, however -but if I'm comparing it to some other books with husband/wife squabbles, this one doesn't come close. See Now Then by Jamaica Kincaid, is one example. An entire book filled with uncomfortable domestic verbal-volleying that would put George and Martha of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf to shame. And then much of it in stream-of-consciousness form to boot. Ughhh!

Connor, As for the homophobia in the story, is there a particular incident in the story you're referring to or the story in general?


message 11: by ConnorD (last edited Aug 24, 2014 02:12PM) (new)

ConnorD | 181 comments Columbus wrote: "Sorry I'm just responding to this. I've finally got my busy things out the way and can now respond quicker.

Priscilla/Beverly: curious to get your opinion on this book.

Connor: I loved the witty ..."


There were, I think two, references to rasta sentiments (and music) to homophobia in the book

Actually the banter between husband and wife reminded of aunt and uncle - so could totally identify with it


message 12: by Beverly (new)

Beverly I finished Mr. Loverman on a long plane ride to China. It was just the book to help pass the time and I laughed out loud and chuckled to myself several times at some of the dialogue/situations. The characters came alive in my mind.

More thoughts coming shortly.


message 13: by Mocha Girl (new)

Mocha Girl (mochagirl) | 8 comments Beverly wrote: "I finished Mr. Loverman on a long plane ride to China. It was just the book to help pass the time and I laughed out loud and chuckled to myself several times at some of the dialogue/situations. The..."

I, too, had some LOL moments with the book! This offering was a very pleasant and unexpected surprise for my reading year. I've been suggesting it to my other literary buddies for their consideration.


message 14: by Mocha Girl (new)

Mocha Girl (mochagirl) | 8 comments Details are fading, but one of the saddest take-aways for me was near the last 1/3 of the book, it was revealed that quite a few either knew or suspected Barry was homosexual (his brother/family, friend(s), etc), but yet so much time was wasted, trust and hopes were crushed, to live this lie. I understand Barry and his partner suffered, but Barry's wife suffered a lot too.


message 15: by Beverly (new)

Beverly Mocha Girl wrote: "Details are fading, but one of the saddest take-aways for me was near the last 1/3 of the book, it was revealed that quite a few either knew or suspected Barry was homosexual (his brother/family, f..."

Sorry it has taken me so long to respond.

At first I had the same thoughts - but then I started thinking about the times, identity, and expectations and I wondered if/what would happen if the "truths" were revealed earlier.

I would agree that Barry's wife suffered a lot but it seemed like her world was surrounded by people who also lived in misery and when she looked at her life then she rationalized in some ways she was less miserable than others.

Also thought that the expectations that the wife had on what was a "good" life was determined on her upbringing and was often reinforced by those around her (mainly meaning her Caribbean girlfriends) and what others "back home" would/were saying about her.

I thought that when she had the affair and explored her sexual nature - she knew in her heart that her marriage was a farce. I wondered what would have happened if she kept having "affairs" or if she and Barry had had an honest conversation about her sexual needs.

I really liked the quote at the beginning of the book by James Baldwin - "Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced."

I thing the quote sums up the book nicely.


message 16: by ColumbusReads (new)

ColumbusReads (coltrane01) | 9 comments I think it would've been easier to gather sympathy for the wife if there wasn't so much religious high-mindedness and proselytizing. However much you cared for Barrington's dashing and whimsical personality, he was cheating on his wife. But, any momentum she may have used in her favor was eroded by her sermonizing.


message 17: by Beverly (new)

Beverly Columbus wrote: "I think it would've been easier to gather sympathy for the wife if there wasn't so much religious high-mindedness and proselytizing. However much you cared for Barrington's dashing and whimsical pe..."

I do not think I was unsympathetic towards the wife. And yes, I did not like the all of the preaching and high-mindedness. Certainly do not like to hear it from one who does not have their own house in order.

I think one of the author's strengths is to show us characters in situations that we might know and expose to how they play into the roles society makes for them and how society shapes people.

I thought overall the characters were well-drawn, complex and flawed.


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