The American Civil War discussion

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General Discussion > Civil War trivia

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message 1: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 4 comments Hello, I'm a newbie. Care to play?


message 2: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 4 comments What military command was given U. S. Grant at the start of the Civil War?


message 3: by James (new)

James | 25 comments Grant, Ulysses S.
21st Regiment, Illinois Infantry



message 4: by George (new)

George | 91 comments what was Sherman's position when the war broke out?


message 5: by James (last edited Oct 03, 2009 07:14AM) (new)

James | 25 comments George wrote: "what was Sherman's position when the war broke out?"

He started out as a Colonel of the 13th Regular Infantry which was routed at Bull Run.


message 6: by George (new)

George | 91 comments true, but when the war actually broke out, he wasn't in the military. so, what was he doing?


message 7: by James (new)

James | 25 comments On April 1, 1861 Sherman moved his family to St. Louis and became the President of the Fifth Street Railroad. Eleven days later Fort Sumter was attacked.


message 8: by George (new)

George | 91 comments very good, and just prior to that, he was head of the Lousiana military academy, which eventually morphed into Louisiana State University, or if you like president of LSU.


message 9: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 4 comments Hello.. i'm a newbie. So here's an easy one.

What famous diarist described people sitting on balconies and drinking salutes to the start of the hostilities?


message 10: by George (new)

George | 91 comments Mary Chesnut?


message 11: by Ted (new)

Ted (efcorson) | 4 comments George wrote: "Mary Chesnut?"

Yes, you're right.


message 12: by Sean (new)

Sean McLachlan | 17 comments Which famous Western lawman (and two of his brothers) fought in Illinois regiments? Answer on my blog post (but try to guess first, and no peeking at the URL!):

http://civilwarhorror.blogspot.co.uk/...


message 13: by Porter (last edited Jun 20, 2020 10:33AM) (new)

Porter Broyles | 195 comments Ok, here's an interesting question. We all know what the battle flag looks like. A red flag with a blue "X" and 13 white stars. 3 stars on each of the four legs of the X with a single star in the center. One star for each of the 13 states to secede. (I'm going to guess that most people know why 13 and not 11.)

Now here is where it gets to be a challenge. Nathan Bedford Forrest 's battle flag is very similar, but with one major difference---it only has 12 stars. The one in the middle is missing. Why?


message 14: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Burke | 29 comments Although both Missouri and Kentucky were admitted to the Confederacy to create the 12th & 13th states, there were questions regarding legitimacy of the state governments that declared secession, especially Kentucky. There were several noted examples of both 11- star and 12- star flags, including the 1863 garrison flag at Vicksburg. It might be that Forrest, having fought against Union Kentucky units did not want that star on his battle flag. The Confederacy in general wanted 13 states in its union for the significance of the original 13 colonies that rebelled against England-- legitimacy.


message 15: by Belle (new)

Belle Blackburn | 15 comments Q: What city was the country's first experience in military occupation?


message 16: by Porter (new)

Porter Broyles | 195 comments Kurt that's my guess as well. I've not seen an official our authorative answer to it


message 17: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 160 comments Belle wrote: "Q: What city was the country's first experience in military occupation?"

I would guess Baltimore, unless you're counting Washington, DC.


message 18: by Belle (new)

Belle Blackburn | 15 comments Nope. And it happened during the Civil War. Shall I tell you now or wait for other guesses?


message 19: by Porter (new)

Porter Broyles | 195 comments Belle wrote: "Nope. And it happened during the Civil War. Shall I tell you now or wait for other guesses?"

I'm not sure of the question... and not sure if you are referring to a foreign country, but New Orleans would be my guess.


message 20: by Manray9 (new)

Manray9 | 433 comments I would guess Alexandria, Va.


message 21: by Belle (new)

Belle Blackburn | 15 comments The US Army occupied a city during the civil war and it was the first time for the US government to do this. It was a city in the US.


message 22: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Burke | 29 comments Porter wrote: "Kurt that's my guess as well. I've not seen an official our authorative answer to it"

Maybe lacking that 13th star helped him get there 'fustest with the mostest':)


message 23: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Burke | 29 comments Belle wrote: "Q: What city was the country's first experience in military occupation?"

Would that be St. Louis, Missouri? I know they realized the strategic value early along with the threat that the Federal arsenal might fall into Confederate hands.


message 24: by Belle (new)

Belle Blackburn | 15 comments It was Nashville. After the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson, Nashville was surrendered without a fight in February 1862. Lincoln appointed Andrew Johnson as the military governor and the city was occupied until the end of the war. It did not go well. Johnson and Gen. Buell had a telegram war going on and they would complain to Lincoln about each other. The people in the city hated being occupied and had to sign an oath of allegiance in order to do business. The Union Army called the Nashville women she-devils because they would dump the contents of their chamber pots on their heads as they walked under their windows.


message 25: by Manray9 (last edited Jun 23, 2020 01:19PM) (new)

Manray9 | 433 comments Belle wrote: "It was Nashville. After the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson, Nashville was surrendered without a fight in February 1862. Lincoln appointed Andrew Johnson as the military governor and the city was ..."

The City of Alexandria begs to differ.

https://www.alexandriava.gov/CivilWar....

Johnson was appointed military governor of Tennessee.


message 26: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 160 comments Baltimore also disagrees - they lay claim to April 19, 1861, the day the Massachusetts troops got off the train and were met by a secessionist mob, also first blood shed.

(I'm on a new tablet and am not sure yet how to copy and paste)

History Channel. Com "first blood in the Civil War


message 27: by Porter (new)

Porter Broyles | 195 comments Kurt wrote: "There were several noted examples of both 11- star and 12- star flags, including the 1863 garrison flag at Vicksburg. It might be that Forrest, having fought against Union Kentucky units did not want that star on his battle flag. ."

I should modify my response... you're overall hypothesis about Forrest not wanting Kentucky on his flag was my hypothesis as well.

While I did know that there were 11 star flags, I didn't know about the 12 star ones. Forrest was the only 12 star one I knew about.


message 28: by Porter (new)

Porter Broyles | 195 comments A side piece of trivia/speculation. I've never seen this in print, but when I do flag presentations/Civil War events, one of my favorite flags is Robert E Lee's Headquarter Flag.

The flag is a version of the first Confederate National Flag, but the 13 stars are arranged to represent "The Ark of the Covenant."

It has 7 stars making a curve, 4 stars below that making a line, and 2 stars below that providing the legs of the Ark.

This image helps me to remind people that there were originally 7 states that seceded from the Union, 4 states joined after Ft Sumter/Lincoln's call to arms, and 2 states were disputed.


message 29: by Ted (new)

Ted Greiner | 32 comments The sea islands of South Carolina were occupied in 1861 and remained that way as well. They are where the North tried various experiments to see if former slaves could run their own plantations and businesses. (They could.) And where Sherman promised those occupying the land of their former slaveholders that they would be able to retain 40 acres and a mule after the war. (Andrew Johnson reneged on this). Like all Blacks and some Whites in the South, they then entered into exploitative sharecropper arrangements and other ways to try scraping together a living. In fact, since whites no longer cared if they were healthy or even alive, conditions for blacks probably got worse. From 1900-1940, pellagra alone (niacin deficiency caused by eating almost nothing but corn) killed 100,000 Americans, mainly southern sharecropper women.


message 30: by Ted (new)

Ted Greiner | 32 comments While it might not be correct to say St. Louis was "occupied" in 1861 (the voters of Missouri--like Kentucky--had voted to remain neutral, even though its government in Jefferson City wanted to join the Confederacy), it was certainly the scene of the first important Union victory. Nathaniel Lyon--the first general killed in the war--deserves far more credit than he gets for driving the rebels out of St. Louis before they could grab the 10-20,000 weapons in the arsenal there and then driving the Jefferson City rebel militia down into the SW corner of the state for the duration of the war (except for one incursion that led no where), preventing the Confederacy from accessing the state's substantial resources throughout the war.


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